Tag Archives: Robert Duncan

Enkidu Surrogate

spicer_billyannouce
Announcement for Billy the Kid, circa 1959. Collage on paper

 

From Stinson Beach in the late 1950s, Jess Collins and Robert Duncan published just two books under their Enkidu Surrogate imprint.

The books were distributed by White Rabbit Press.

 

 

 

A1. Spicer, Jack. BILLY THE KID
spicer_billya. First edition, first state:
Stinson Beach: Enkidu Surrogate, October 1959
Saddle-stapled in illustrated wrappers, 6.5? x 8.5?, 16 pages, 750 copies, offset printed.  Illustrations by Jess Collins.

b. First edition, second state:
The second state includes holograph corrections to text on page 8

A2. Duncan, Robert. FAUST FOUTU
duncan_faust03a. First edition, regular copies:
Stinson Beach: Enkidu Surrogate, November 1959
Saddle-stapled in illustrated wrappers, 7″ x 8.5″, 71 pages, 750 copies. Illustrated by Robert Duncan. (Bertholf A7c)

b. First edition, numbered and signed copies:
Stinson Beach: Enkidu Surrogate, November 1959
Saddle-stapled in illustrated wrappers, 7″ x 8.5″, 71 pages, 50 copies numbered and signed with a drawing. Illustrated by Robert Duncan. (Bertholf A7d)

This is the first complete printing of the play, after a privately printed mimeographed first printing in 1953, and a second from White Rabbit Press in 1958. 

Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts

Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts ran for thirteen issues from 1962 to 1965. Considered one of the most influential underground magazines of the early sixties, Ed Sanders’ Fuck You was a deliberately fypprovocative mimeographed journal, at first emphasizing poetry and later expanding to include other writing. Each issue is illustrated with line drawings by Sanders.

Contributors include Sanders, Tuli Kupferberg, Carol Bergé, John Wieners, Andy Warhol, Ray Bremser, Lenore Kandel, Charles Olson, Joel Oppenheimer, Peter Orlovsky, Philip Whalen, Allen Ginsberg, Herbert Huncke, Julian Beck, Frank O’Hara, Leroi Jones, Diane DiPrima, William Burroughs, Gary Snyder, Robert Kelly, Judith Malina, Carl Solomon, Gregory Corso, Robert Duncan, Robert Creeley, Michael McClure, Ted Berrigan, Joe Brainard, Gilbert Sorrentino, and many others — a virtual “who’s who” of avant garde poetry in the Sixties.


1. Fuck You, No. 1, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: February 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

2. Fuck You, No. 2, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: April 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

3. Fuck You, No. 3, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: June 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

4. Fuck You, No. 4, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: August 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

5. Fuck You, No. 5, Vol. 1, edited by Ed Sanders
fy51New York: December 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

“Dedicated to pacificism, national defense thru nonviolent resistence, total assault on the culture, vaginal zapping, multilateral indiscriminate apertural conjugation, Hole Cons, Crotch Lake, Peace Eye, mad bands of stompers for peace, & all those gropped by J. Edgar Hoover in the silent halls of congress.”

6. Fuck You, No. 5, Vol. 2, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: December 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

7. Fuck You, Number 5, Volume 3, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: May 1963
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

“Dedicated to pacificism, National Defense thru Nonviolent Resistance, Anarchia the Goddess, Orlovsky’s long Egyptian finger, Peace Eye, Hole Cons, Peace Walk Dicking, dope thrill Banana rites, Acapulco Gold, Panamanian Red, Honduras Brown, windowbox freak grass, the anarcho-commio-greaser conspiracy, submarine boarders, mad bands of stompers for Peace, and all those groped by J. Edgar Hoover in the silent halls of Congress”.

8. Fuck You, Number 5, Volume 4, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Summer 1963
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

9. Fuck You, Number 5, Volume 5, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: December 1963
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

10. Fuck You, Number 5, Volume 6, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: April/May 1963
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

11. Fuck You, Number 5, Volume 7, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: September 1964
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

12. Fuck You, Volume 5, Number 8, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: March 1965
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover artwork by Andy Warhol.

13. Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts, Volume 5, Number 9

Measure

wieners


“The three simple, almost starkly working-class issues of Measure followed glorious and overlooked “underground” poet John Wieners from Black Mountain College home to Boston, across country to San Francisco, and back to Boston again. In his years in San Francisco, from 1958 to 1960, Wieners attended (sometimes serving as host at his Scott Street apartment) the legendary Sunday afternoon poetry workshops of the charismatic poets Robert Duncan and Jack Spicer. Also present at the workshops were George Stanley, Harold Dull, Robin Blaser (The Pacific Nation), and many others…”
— from A Secret Location on the Lower East Side (Granary Books, 1998)

Measure, No. 1, edited by John Wieners
mags_measure01Boston: Measure, Summer 1957
Saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 48 pages, letterpress printed at the Press of Villiers Publications..

“Measure is edited by John Wieners. It will be issued with the four seasons only through your support… Please understand that the opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the city.”

Contributors:
Tom Balas – “Le Fou”
Charles Olson – “Le Bonheur!”, “The Charge”, “Spring”
Edward Marshall – “One:”, “Two:”
Robin Blaser – “Poem”, “Letters to Freud”, “Poem by the Charles River”
Edward Dorn – “The Rick of Green Wood”
Larry Eigner – “Millionem”, “Brink”
Frank O’Hara – “section 9 from Second Avenue”
Fielding Dawson – “Two Drawings”
Stephen Jonas – “Word on Measure”, “Expanded Word on Measure”
Michael Rumaker – “Father”
Gavin Douglas – “The Blanket”
Jack Spicer – “Song for Bird and Myself”
Jonathan Williams – “Two Poems for Whitman, the Husbandman”
Robert Duncan – “The Propositions”

Measure, No. 2, edited by John Wieners
mags_measure2San Francisco: Measure, Winter 1958
Saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 64 pages, letterpress printed at the Press of Villiers Publications.

“Magick is for the ones who ball, i.e. throw across”

Contributors:
Michael Rumaker – “The use of the Unconscious”
Robin Blaser – “The Hunger of Sound”
Robert Creeley – “Juggler’s Thot”
Michael Rumaker – “8 Dreams”
Jack Kerouac – “4 Choruses”
Charles Olson – “Descensus Spiritus No. 1”
Robert Duncan – “The Maiden”
Robert Creeley – “They Say”, “She Went to Say”
Jack Kerouac – “235th Chorus”
Edward Dorn – “Notes from the Fields”
Robert Duncan – “The Dance”
Stuart Z. Perkoff – “Feats of Death, Feasts of Love”
V. R. Lang – “The Recidivists”
Gregory Corso – “Yaaaah”
James Broughton – “Feathers or Lead”
Michael McClure – “The Magazine Cover”, “One & Two”
Robert Creeley – “The Tunnel”, “Just Friends”
Richard Duerden – “Musica No. 3”
Stephen Jonas – “Books 3 & 4 from a Long Poem”

Measure, No. 3, edited by John Wieners
mags_measure03Milton: Measure, Winter 1962
Saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 36 pages, letterpress printed at the Press of Villiers Publications.

“THE CITY / 1 AM – Unreasonable fear, of the shadows of Harry Lime, of the dead reappearing”

Contributors:
James Schuyler – “Shed Market”, “Joint”
Gerrit Lansing – “Explorers”
Barbara Guest – “Safe Flights”, [untitled] “Once when he was a small boy…”,  “Abruptly, as if a Forest Might Say”
Helen Adam – “Anaid si Taerg (Great is Diana)”
Madeline Gleason – “Wind Said, Marry”
Robert Duncan – “What do I Know of the Old Lore?”
Jack Spicer – “Central Park West”
Larry Eigner – “Poem”
Tom Field – [untitled] “Form is never more than the extension…”
Edward Marshall – “Times Square”, “2”, “3”
John Wieners – “The Imperatrice”
Philip Lamantia – “Opus Magnum”
Sheri Martinelli – “Ruth Gildenberg”
Michael Rumaker – “The River at Night”
Charles Olson – “The Year is a Great Circle…”, The Post Virginal”, [untitled] “Desartes, age 34…”
John Haines – “Poem”, “Pawnee Dust”

Berkeley Miscellany

Berkeley Miscellany, No. 1, edited by Robert Duncan
mags_miscellany01Berkeley: Berkeley Miscellany, 1948
Saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 6″ x 9.5″, 24 pages, letterpress printed at the Libertarian Press.

Contributors:
Robert Duncan – “A Description of Venice”
Jack Spicer – “A Night in Four Parts”
Mary Fabilli – “The Lost Love of Aurora Bligh”

Berkeley Miscellany, No. 2, edited by Robert Duncan
Berkeley: Berkeley Miscellany, 1949
Hand-sewn printed wrappers, 6″ x 9.5″, 32 pages, letterpress printed at the Libertarian Press.

Contributors:
Mary Fabilli – “An Hour or Two or Quiet Talk”
Mary Fabilli – “The Garden”
Robert Duncan – 3 Poems in Homage to the Brothers Grimm: “The Robber Moon”, “The Strawberries Under the Snow”, “The Dinner Table of Harlequin”
Gerald Ackerman – “At the Beach”
Jack Spicer – “The Scroll-Work on the Casket”

The Rivoli Review

The Rivoli Review, Vol. Zero, No. One, edited by Richard Duerden 
mags_rivoli01San Francicso: The Rivoli Review 1963
Side-stapled illustrated wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 24 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover illustration by Jess Collins.

 

Contributors:
Ford Madox Ford – “Meary Walker”
Robert Duncan – “Weacing the Design”
James Koller – [untitled] “mottled brown birds…”
Richard Duerden – “Seven: #2 La Martine Place”
Denise Levertov – “Hypocrite Women”
Lynn Lonidier – “Chagall and Bella”
Ron Loewinsohn – “Art for Art’s Sake”, “The Rain, The Rain”
Gerald Gilbert – [untitled] “Sunshine…”
Lorenzo Thomas – “Grass”, “West”
Robert Peterson – “Critical Times”
Ron Loewinsohn – “Fuck You Roger Maris”
Philip Whalen – “Plums, Metaphysics, An Investigation, A Visit and a Short Funeral Ode”
Ron Loewinsohn – “It is to be Bathed in Light”

The Rivoli Review, Vol. Zero, No. Two, edited by Richard Duerden 
mags_rivoli02San Francicso: The Rivoli Review 1964
Side-stapled illustrated wrappers, 8.5″ x 14″, 30 pages, mimeograph printed.

 

Contributors:
James Koller – “The People are Coming”
Ron Loewinsohn – “A Place to Go”
Jess Collins – “Song of the Pied Parrot”
Lew Brown – “from Lionel”
Deneen Brown – “Azalea Poem”
George Stanley – “Argus”
Robert Duncan – “Passages III”, “Passages 3-4”
Richard Duerden – “Silence, and Katharsis”
Lew Brown – “The Broadjump”, “from Lionel”
Jack Anderson – “The Scale of It”
Richard Duerden – “The Sonata”
Jack Anderson – “Man in a Doorway”
Gerard Malanga – “Final Sonnet XC”

Jess Collins

Jess Collins (August 6, 1923 – January 2, 2004) was born Burgess Franklin Collins in Long Beach, California. He was initially educated as a chemisjess1956t, having received his B.S. at the California Institute of Technology in 1948, and in his career worked on the production of plutonium for the Manhattan Project.  In 1949 he abandoned his scientific career and moved to San Francisco where he enrolled in the California School of Fine Arts  (now the San Francisco Art Institute) and began referring to himself simply as “Jess”. He met Robert Duncan in 1951, a relationship  that lasted until the poet’s death in 1988.

jess002
Alternative cover for O!, 1959

In 1952 Jess, Duncan, and Harry Jacobus opened the King Ubu Gallery, which became an important venue for alternative art in San Francisco. And it remained so when it was  reopened as the Six Gallery in 1954 by Wally Hedrick, Deborah Remington, John Ryan, Jack Spicer, Hayward King, and David Simpson.

A celebrated painter and collage artist, Jess was a leading light of the San Francisco art scene from the 1950s until his death in 2004, and one of the most original artists of the second half of the 20th century.

Jess was a quietly independent artist who in his paintings, collages, and sculptures developed a complex synthesis of art and literary history. Jess’ unique imagery, evolved from mythology and fables both playful and profound, has long been admired by critics, curators and writers. Using paper collage or his eccentric painting techniques, Jess’ pictures referenced ancient stories and invented symbols. Jess constructed a private world of delicate beauty and gentle absurdity. 


A. Books and Broadsides

1. Artists View #8
Tiburon: Artist’s View, 1954
Poems and paste-ups, folded broadside, entire issue devoted to the work of Jess.

2. O!
New York: Hawks Well Press, 1960
Paste-ups and poems, stapled wrappers, with a preface by Robert Duncan.




3. The Dios Kuroi
Off-print from The Northwest Review, 1963
Paste-up sequence.


B. Contributions to Books and Other Publications

1. Jess Collins and Robert Duncan. Boob #1
jess_boob01San Francisco: [privately printed], 1952
Broadside. Paste-up.




2. Jess Collins and Robert Duncan. Boob #2
jess_boob02San Francisco: [privately printed], 1952
Broadside. Paste-up.




3. Duncan, Robert. Caesar’s Gate
Mallorca: Divers Press, 1955.
Cover and 16 paste-ups.





4. Jonas, Steve. The Poem, The Sea & Other Pieces Examined.
jonas_loveSan Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1957.
Cover illustration and titling. (Johnston A1)





5. Spicer, Jack. AFTER LORCA
spicer_lorcaSan Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1957
Cover illustration. (Johnston A2)





6. Levertov, Denise. FIVE POEMS
levertov_fiveSan Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1958
Cover illustration. (Johnston A3)





7. Adam, Helen. The Queen O’ Crow Castle
adam_queenSan Francisco: White Rabbit, 1958
Cover illustration, titling, and six drawings. (Johnston A9)




8. Olson, Charles. O’Ryan 2 4 6 8 10
olson_oryanSan Francisco: White Rabbit, 1958
Cover illustration. (Johnston A10)





9. Spicer, Jack. Billy The Kid
spicer_billyStinson Beach: Enkidu Surrogate Press, 1959
Cover illustration and seven drawings.





10. Duncan, Robert. The Opening of The Field
New York: Grove Press, 1960
Frontispiece drawing.

11. Adam, Helen and Pat. San Francisco’s Burning
Berkeley: Oannes Press, 1963
Cover illustration and six drawings.

12. Duncan, Robert. Unkingd by Affection 
San Francisco: San Francisco Arts Festival, 1963
Illustrated broadside.

13. Adam, Helen. Ballads
New York: Acadia Press, 1964
Cover illustration, titling, title page, and 15 drawings. Two additional drawings included in limited edition with hand-tinted cover.

14. Borregaard, Ebbe. When Did Morning Wind Rip Callow Flowers in May… 
San Francisco, San Francisco Arts Festival, 1964
Illustrated broadside.

15. Duncan, Robert. A Book of Resemblances
New Haven: Henry Wenning, 1966
Illustrations in two colors.

16. Duncan, Robert. The Cat and The Blackbird
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1967
Cover illustration, titling, and drawings.





17. Duncan, Robert. Names of People
Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press, 1968
Illustrations.

18. Dunn, Joe. Better Dream House
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1968
Cover and 11 paste-ups.





19. Morgenstern, Christian. Gallowsongs 
Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press 1970
Illustrations.


C. Contributions to Periodicals

1. Artists View #0. Tiburon, 1952. Paste-up poem

2. Artists View #5. Tiburon, 1953. Cover illustration.

3. Poems & Pictures #1. 1954. Poem

4. Black Mountain Review #4. 1956. Paste-up poem.

5. Black Mountain Review #6. 1956. Paste-ups

6. Ark II, Moby I. 1956. Translations.

7. J #2. 1959. Notes on painting.

8. J #5. 1959. Cover illustration and comic strip.

9. J #6. 1959. Comic strip.

10. Chelsea #7. 1960. Translations.

11. An Apparition of The Late J. 1960. Poem.

12. Folio 3. Bloomington, Summer 1960. Paste-up.

13. Foot #1. 1960. Poem.

14. Foot #2. 1962. Poem.

15. The Northwest Review 4. Eugene, Winter 1963. Paste-up sequence.

16. Semina 8. Los Angeles, 1963. Paste-up.

17. The Rivoli Review #1. 1964. Cover illustration.

18. The Rivoli Review #2. 1964. Poem.

19. Writing 3. 1964. Cover illustration and five drawings.

20. Open Space #1. 1964. Dream record.

21. Open Space #2. 1964. Dream record and letter.

22. Open Space #Twin 4. 1964. Dream record.

23. Open Space #6. 1964. Dream record and drawing.

24. Open Space #7. 1964. Cover illustration and dream record.

25. Open Space #8. 1964. Paste-up.

26. Open Space #9. 1964. Drawing.

27. Open Space #10. 1964. Cover illustration and paste-up.

28. Open Space #12. 1964. Drawing.

29. Floating Bear #31. 1965. Cover illustration.

30. Insect Trust Gazette #2. 1965. Paste-up.

31. Some / Thing #8. 1966. Paste-up.

32. The Tenth Muse #14. 1967. Cover illustration.

33. The Tenth Muse #15. 1967. Cover illustration.

34. The Tenth Muse #21. 1968. Cover illustration.

35. The Tenth Muse #26. 1969. Cover paste-up.


Further Reading

Hyperallergic
The Paris Review
Siglio Press

Poet as Crystal Radio Set

Although known primarily among a coterie of poets in the San Francisco Bay Area at the time of his death in 1965, Jack Spicer has slowly become a towering figure in American poetry. He was born in Los Angeles in 1925 to midwestern parents and raised in a Calvinist jack-spicerhome. While attending college at the University of California-Berkeley, Spicer met fellow poets Robin Blaser and Robert Duncan. The friendship among these three poets would develop into what they referred to as “The Berkeley Renaissance,” which would in turn become the San Francisco Renaissance after Spicer, Blaser and Duncan moved to San Francisco in the 1950s.

In 1954, he co-founded the Six Gallery in San Francisco, which soon became famous as the scene of the October 1955 Six Gallery reading that launched the West Coast Beat movement. In 1955, Spicer moved to New York and then to Boston, where he worked for a time in the Rare Book Room of Boston Public Library. Blaser was also in Boston at this time, and the pair made contact with a number of local poets, including John Wieners, Stephen Jonas, and Joe Dunn.

Spicer returned to San Francisco in 1956 and started working on After Lorca. This book represented a major change in direction for two reasons. Firstly, he came to the conclusion that stand-alone poems (which Spicer referred to as his one-night stands) were unsatisfactory and that henceforth he would compose serial poems. In fact, he wrote to Blaser that ‘all my stuff from the past (except the Elegies and Troilus) looks foul to me.’ Secondly, in writing After Lorca, he began to practice what he called “poetry as dictation”.

In 1957, Spicer ran a workshop called Poetry as Magic at San Francisco State College, which was attended by Duncan, Helen Adam, James Broughton, Joe Dunn, Jack Gilbert, and George Stanley. He also participated in, and sometimes hosted, Blabbermouth Night at a literary bar called The Place. This was a kind of contest of improvised poetry and encouraged Spicer’s view of poetry as being dictated to the poet. (more…)

Jack Spicer

youngspicer

 

Although known primarily among a coterie of poets in the San Francisco Bay Area at the time of his death in 1965, Jack Spicer has slowly become a towering figure in American poetry. He was born in Los Angeles in 1925 to midwestern parents and raised in a Calvinist home. While attending college at the University of California-Berkeley, Spicer met fellow poets Robin Blaser and Robert Duncan. The friendship among these three poets would develop into what they referred to as “The Berkeley Renaissance,” which would in turn become the San Francisco Renaissance after Spicer, Blaser and Duncan moved to San Francisco in the 1950s.

At Berkeley Spicer studied linguistics, finishing all but his dissertation for a PhD in Anglo-Saxon and Old Norse. In 1950 he lost his teaching assistantship after refusing to sign a “loyalty oath” to the United States, which the University of California required of all its employees under the Sloan-Levering Act. Spicer taught briefly at the University of Minnesota and worked for a short period of time in the rare books room at the Boston Public Library, but he lived the majority of his life in San Francisco working as a researcher in linguistics.

jack-spicer
Jack Spicer at the opening of the 6 Gallery, Halloween 1954. Photo by Robert Berg.

Spicer helped to form the 6 Gallery with five painter friends in 1954. It was at the 6 Gallery during Spicer’s sojourn east that Allen Ginsberg first read Howl. As a native Californian, Spicer tended to view the Beats as usurpers and criticized the poetry and self-promotion of poets like Ginsberg and Lawrence Ferlinghetti, as well as the Beat ethos in general. Always weary of labels and definitions, Spicer tended to associate with small, intimate groups of poets who lived in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco. Spicer acted as a mentor and teacher to these young poets by running poetry workshops and providing (sometimes caustic) advice for young poets.

In a 1975 New York Times article, Richard Ellman concluded: “Jack Spicer’s poems are always poised just on the face side of language, dipping all the way over toward that sudden flip, as if an effort were being made through feeling strongly in simple words to sneak up on the event of a man ruminating about something, or celebrating something, without rhetorical formulae, in his own beautiful inept awkwardness. It’s that poised ineptitude and awkwardness of the anti-academic teacher, the scholar of linguistics who can’t say what he knows in formal language, and has chosen to be very naive and look and hear and do. Spicer was not a very happy poet. He was obsessed with possibilities he could only occasionally realize, and too aware of contemporary life to settle for anything less in his work than what he probably could not achieve. He must have been a great spirit.”


Section A:
Books, Chapbooks, and Pamphlets

A1. AFTER LORCA
spicer_lorcaa. First edition, regular copies:
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, November-December 1957
Saddle-stapled illustrated wrappers, 6.5″ x 8.5″, 76 pages, 474 copies, multilith printed by Joe Dunn. Jack Spicer’s first book of poetry. Cover illustration by Jess Collins. Introduction by Federico Garcia Lorca.
(Johnston A2)

b. First edition, lettered and signed copies:
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, November-December 1957
Saddle-stapled illustrated wrappers, 6.5″ x 8.5″, 76 pages, 26 copies lettered and signed with a drawing by the author, multilith printed by Joe Dunn. Jack Spicer’s first book of poetry. Cover illustration by Jess Collins. Introduction by Federico Garcia Lorca.
(Johnston A2)

c. First edition, second issue:
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, November-December 1957
Unbound with out wrappers issued in mailing envelope, 6.5″ x 8.5″, 76 pages, 20 copies, multilith printed by Joe Dunn. Jack Spicer’s first book of poetry. Cover illustration by Jess Collins. Introduction by Federico Garcia Lorca.
(Johnston A2)

d. First UK edition:
London: Aloes Books, 1969

e. Second edition:
n.p.: Marco Polio, 1974

A2. HOMAGE TO CREELEY 
spicer_homageFirst edition:
Annapolis: privately printed by Harold and Dore Dull, Summer 1959
Side-stapled printed sheets, 8.5″ x 11″, 33 pages, 100 copies, spirit-mimeo printed. Incorporated into A4.
[not in archive]

A3. BILLY THE KID
spicer_billya. First edition, first state:
Stinson Beach: Enkidu Surrogate, October 1959
Saddle-stapled illustrated wrappers, 6.5″ x 8.5″, 16 pages, 750 copies, offset printed.  Illustrations by Jess Collins.

b. First edition, second state:
The second state includes holograph corrections to text on page 8.

c. Second edition:
n.p.: Oyster Press, March 1975
Hand-sewn printed wrappers, 6.75″ x 5.75″,  16 pages, 350 copies, letterpress printed

A4. THE HEADS IF THE TOWN UP TO THE AETHER
spicer_headsa. First edition, regular copies:
San Francisco: Auerhahn Press, 1962
Perfect-bound illustrated  and printed wrappers, 4.75″ x 6.75″, 109 pages, 750 copies, letterpress printed. Illustrated by Fran Herndon.
(Auerhahn 21)

b. First edition, hardcover, signed copies:
San Francisco: Auerhahn Press, 1962
First edition, hardcover, signed by the author and artist, with an original drawing, 4.75″ x 7.25″, 109 pages, 50 copies signed by the author, letterpress printed, bound by the Schuberth Bindery. Illustrated by Fran Herndon.
(Auerhahn 21)

Printed announcement issued.

A5. LAMENT FOR THE MAKERS
spicer_lamenta. First edition:
Oakland: White Rabbit Press, 1962
Hand-sewn illustrated wrappers, 5.5″ x 8″, 16 pages, 100 copies, offset printed. Illustrated by Graham Mackintosh.
(Johnston A11)

According to Johnston, “Back of title page has a fictitious acknowledgments list (by Graham Mackintosh) taken from Robert Duncan’s The Opening of the Field.”

b. First UK edition:
London: Aloes, 1971

A6. THE HOLY GRAIL
spicer_holya. First edition, regular copies:
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1964
Saddle-stapled sheets glued into illustrated wrappers, 6.25″ x 8.5″, 80 pages, offset printed. Illustrated by Graham Mackintosh. (Johnston A19)

b. First edition, hardcover copies:
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1964
First edition, hardcover, 6.25″ x 8.5″, 80 pages, 13 copies signed (4 were reportedly destroyed during signing), offset printed. Illustrated by Graham Mackintosh.
(Johnston A19)

c. Second, Pirated edition:
spicer_holy2Berkeley: Jolly Roger Press, February 1969
Side-stapled printed and illustrated sheets, 8.5″ x 11″, 18 pages, 500 copies.

Pirate’s Note: “I only heard Jack Spicer read once, at the the Berkeley poetry conference in july 65. an hour after he read THE HOLY GRAIL, the last copy was gone from the avenue bookstores… this free pirate edition is distributed to make the poem available to those who need it.”

d. Third edition:
Watertown: Augtwofive, 1970






e. Fourth edition:
Portland: Timeworn (Poor Claudia at Revolution Publishing), 2014

A7. LANGUAGE
spicer_languagea. First edition:
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, June 1965
Perfect-bound illustrated wrappers, 6.25″ x 10″, 72 pages, 950 copies, letterpress printed by Graham Mackintosh.
(Johnston A30)

b. First edition, second printing:
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1970
Perfect-bound illustrated wrappers, 6.25″ x 10″, 72 pages, 950 copies, offset printed from the first edition. Text added to the colophon: “Second printing 1970”.
(Johnston A54)

A8. BOOK OF MAGAZINE VERSE
spicer_magazinea. First edition:
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1966
Perfect-bound printed and illustrated wrappers, 5.5″ x 7.75″, 56 pages, 1500 copies, letterpress printed by Graham Mackintosh. Prepared for publication from the original manuscript by Stan Persky. Illustrated by Graham Mackintosh.
(Johnston A33)

According to Johnston, “The cover is a parody of the cover of Poetry (Chicago). The poems are arranged in groups intended for various little magazines and newspapers, each section printed on a stock appropriate to that publication, so that for example, the poems for Tish are on blue mimeo paper, those for the St. Louis Sporting News on newsprint.”

b. First edition, second printing
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1970
Perfect-bound printed and illustrated wrappers, 5.5″ x 7.75″, 56 pages, 1500 copies, letterpress printed by Graham Mackintosh. Prepared for publication from the original manuscript by Stan Persky. Illustrated by Graham Mackintosh.
(Johnston A33)

A9. A BOOK OF MUSIC
spicer_musica. First edition, regular copies:
San Francisco: White Rabbit, 1969
Saddle-stapled illustrated wrappers, 6.25″ x 9.25″, 20 pages, 1800 copies designed and printed by Ron and Graham Mackintosh from a typescript made available by Peter Howard. The cover was one decided upon by the author. Illustrated by Graham Mackintosh.
(Johnston A48)

b. First edition, variant copies:
Variant copies include additional printed text on the front leaf: “150 copies printed Christmas, 1969 / for friends of White Rabbit, Oyez, / and the author”.
(Johnston A48a)

A10. THE RED WHEELBARROW
a. First edition, regular copies:
Berkeley: Arif Press, June 1971
Hand-sewn printed and illustrated wrappers, 5.5″ x 5.5″, 24 pages, 475 copies, letterpress printed. Illustrated by  Wesley Tanner. Printed by Wesley Tanner at Cranium Press.

b. First edition, numbered copies:
Berkeley: Arif Press, June 1971
Hand-sewn printed and illustrated wrappers, 5.5″ x 5.5″, 24 pages, 25 copies with hand-colored frontispiece, signed by the illustrator, letterpress printed. Illustrated by  Wesley Tanner. Printed by Wesley Tanner at Cranium Press.

Printed announcement issued.

A11. SOME THINGS FROM JACK
First edition:
Verona: Plain Wrapper Press, 1972
Wrappers, 6.5″ x 10.25″, 11 pages, 91 numbered copies, printed letterpress. Introduction by Richard Rummonds. Linocut by Miroslav Zahradka.

A12. BALLAD OF THE DEAD WOODCUTTER
First edition:
Berkeley: Arif Press, 1973
Single sheet folded twice to make a four-page booklet, 6″ x 3.5″ (when folded), letterpress printed by Wesley Tanner.

A13. ADMONITIONS
First edition:
New York: Adventures in Poetry, 1974
Side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 44 pages, mimeograph printed.



A14. A LOST POEM
First edition:
Verona: Plain Wrapper Press, 1974
Hardcover, 9.5″ x 11.5″, 8 pages, 114 numbered copies signed by the artist, letterpress printed. Postscript by Richard-Gabriel Rummonds. Illustrated with two etchings by Ariel Parkinson.

A15. FIFTEEN FALSE PROPOSITIONS ABOUT GOD
First edition:
South San Francisco: Manroot, September 1974
Saddle-stapled printed and illustrated wrappers, 6.5″ x 8.5″, 16 pages, offset printed.

Poem first appeared in Beatitude, No. 3 (San Francisco, May 1959)

A16. THE COLLECTED BOOKS OF JACK SPICER
a. First edition, paperback copies:
Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press, May 1975
Perfect-bound printed wrappers, 6.25″ x 8.75″, 382 pages including bibliography of first editions, 1000 copies. Edited and with commentary by Robin Blaser. Typography by Graham Mackintosh/White Rabbit.

b. First edition, hardcover copies: 
Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press, May 1975
Hardcover in acetate dust jacket, 6.5″ x 9″, 382 pages including bibliography of first editions, 1000 copies. Edited and with commentary by Robin Blaser. Typography by Graham Mackintosh/White Rabbit.

c. First edition, hardcover, numbered and signed copies:
Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press, May 1975
Hardcover in acetate dust jacket and slipcase, 6.5″ x 9″, 382 pages including bibliography of first editions, 100 copies, numbered and signed by Robin Blaser. Edited and with commentary by Robin Blaser. Typography by Graham Mackintosh/White Rabbit.

A17. ONE NIGHT STAND AND OTHER POEMS
First edition:
San Francisco: Grey Fox Press, 1980

A18. COLLECTED POEMS, 1945-46
First edition:
Berkeley: Oyez/White Rabbit Press, 1981
Saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 7″ x 9″, 32 pages, lithographed from the author’s typescript.


A19. THE TOWER OF BABEL
First edition:
Hoboken, N.J: Talisman House, 1994
Perfect-bound photo-illustrated wrappers, 170 pages. Charpter one of Jack Spicer’s Detective Novel, edited by Ed Foster and Kevin Killian.

Described by Lewis Ellingham and Kevin Killian as “a satiric look at the private world of poetry gone public in the wake of the Six Gallery HOWL reading of October, 1955.”

A20. TRAIN OF THOUGHT
First edition:
Gran Canaria: Zasterle Press, 1994
Charpter three of Jack Spicer’s Detective Novel






Section B:
Broadsides, Posters, and Postcards

B1. A REDWOOD FOREST
spicer_redwoodFirst edition:
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1965
First edition, broadside, 8″ x 10.25″, letterpress printed. An excerpt from Language.
(Johnston B1)


B2. THE DAY FIVE THOUSAND FISH DIED IN THE CHARLES RIVER
First edition:
Pleasant Valley: Kriya Press, 1967
First edition, broadside, 11″ x 16″, 100 numbered copies, offset printed.
[not in archive]


B3. INDIAN SUMMER: MINNEAPOLIS 1950
First edition:
Brooklyn: Samuel Charters, 1970
First edition, broadside, 8″ x 18″, 100 copies. Published as Portents 16

B4. POSTSCRIPT
First edition:
Albuquerque: Billy Goat Press, 1973
First edition, broadside, 11″ x 17″, 100 numbered copies.

B5. BERKELEY IN A TIME OF PLAGUE
a. First edition, grey stock copies:
Berkeley: Arif Press, 1974
First edition, broadside, 9.25″ x 11.5″, 100 copies on grey stock.  Printed by Alastair Johnston at the Arif Press.

b. First edition, white stock copies:
Berkeley: Arif Press, 1974
First edition, broadside, 9.25″ x 11.5″, 50 copies on white stock. Printed by Alastair Johnston at the Arif Press.

B6. THE OAKS WEEP
First edition:
Berkeley: Poltroon Press, 1986
First edition, postcard, 4″ x 6″, letterpress printed.

B7. JACK SPICER 1925-1965
First edition:
Berkeley: Arif Press, 1986
First edition, broadside, 16″ x 10″, letterpress printed.

An excerpt from the second of three “lectures” that Spicer gave in Vancouver in 1965.

B8. LAMENT FOR THE MAKERS
First edition:
n.p.: White Rabbit Press, 2009
Prints an excerpt from Lament for the Makers. Issued as a keepsake for The Book Club of California.


Section C:
Contributions to Books and Other Publications

C1. THE NEW AMERICAN POETRY, 1945-1960, edited by Donald Allen
a. First edition, paperback copies:
New York: Grove Press, 1960
“Imaginary Elegies I-IV”

b. First edition, hardcover copies:
New York: Grove Press, 1960
“Imaginary Elegies I-IV”

C2. THE SPICER-FERLINGHETTI CORRESPONDENCE
spicer_ferlingFirst edition:
San Francisco: White Rabbit Press, 1964
First edition, single 8.5″ x 14″ sheet folded once, letterpress.
(Johnston A18)

C3. THE NEW WRITING IN THE U.S.A., edited by Donald Allen and Robert Creeley
First edition:
Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1967
“Love Poems”

C4. POETICS OF THE NEW AMERICAN POETRY, edited by Donald Allen
First edition:
New York: Grove Press, 1973

A21. AN ODE AND ARCADIA
First edition:
Berkeley: Ark Press, 1974
First edition, wrappers, 1000 copies


Section D
Contributions to Periodicals

D1. THE OCCICENT, edited by Jocelyn Willat
mags_occidentwint46Berkeley, Winter 1946
“To the Semanticists”, “The Chess Game”, “A New Testament”




D2. CONTOUR QUARTERLY, Vol. 1, No. 1, edited by Chris Maclaine
mags_contour01Berkeley, April 1947
[untitled] “After the ocean, shattering with equinox…”, “4 A.M.”, “Chinoiserie”




D3. BERKELEY MISCELLANY, No. 1, edited by Robert Duncan
mags_miscellany01Berkeley, 1948
“A Night in Four Parts”, “Troy Poem”, “Sonnet”





D4. BERKELEY MISCELLANY, No. 2, edited by Robert Duncan
mags_miscellany02Berkeley, 1949
“The Scroll-Work on the Casket”





D5. THE OCCIDENT, edited by Lynne Brown
mags_occidentfall49Berkeley, Fall 1949
“The Poet & Poetry: A Symposium”





D6. LANGUAGE: JOURNAL OF THE LINGUISTIC SOCIETY OF AMERICA, Vol. 28, No. 3, Part I
Baltimore, July-September 1952
“Correlation Methods of Comparing Ideolects in a Transition Area”

D7. OCCIDENT, edited by Richard Rummonds
Berkeley: Associated Students of the University of California, Spring 1954
“The Inheritance: Palm Sunday”




D8. EVERGREEN REVIEW, Vol. 1, No. 2, edited by Barney Rosset and Donald Allen
mags_evergreen0102New York City, 1957
“Berkeley in Time of Plague”, “The Dancing Ape…”, “Troy Poem”, “The Scroll-work on the Casket”, “Hibernation – After Morris Graves”, “Psychoanalysis: An Elegy”, “The Song of the Bird in the Loins”

D9. MEASURE, No. 1, edited by John Wieners
mags_measure01Boston, Summer 1957
“Song for Bird and Myself”





D10. BEATITUDE, No. 3, published by John Kelly
mags_beatitude03San Francisco, 23 May 1959
“Fifteen False Propositions about God”





D11. BEATITUDE, No. 6, published by John Kelly
San Francisco, [June] 1959
“Epithalamium” [co-authored with Bruce Boyd, Ronald Primack, and George Stanley]




D12. J, No. 1, edited by Jack Spicer
mags_j01San Francisco, 1959
“Hokkus”





D13. J, No. 2, edited by Jack Spicer
San Francisco, 1959
[untitled] “Down to new beaches where the sea…”, “Epilog of Jim”
[not in archive]



D14. J, No. 3, edited by Jack Spicer
San Francisco, 1959
“Last Hokku”, [untitled] “The shabby sea where you float in…”




D15. J, No. 4, edited by Jack Spicer
mags_j04San Francisco, [October] 1959
“Jacob”





D16. J, No. 5, edited by Jack Spicer
mags_j05San Francisco, 1959
“Fifth Elegy”





D17. BEATITUDE, No. 17, edited by Bob Kaufman
mags_beatitude17San Francisco: City Light Books, Oct-Nov 1960
“When I hear the word Ferlinghetti / I reach for my g. . . n” [attributed to Jack Slicer]




D18. J, No. 8, edited by Harold Dull
San Francisco, 1961
“A Translation for Jim”

D19. FOOT, No. 2, edited by Richard Duerden and William Brown
mags_foot02
Berkeley, 1962
“Correspondence”





D20. THE SAN FRANCISCO CAPITALIST BLOODSUCKER / N
mags_capitalistSan Francisco, Spring 1962
“Three Marxist Essays”





D21. MEASURE, No. 3, edited by John Wieners
mags_measure03Boston, Summer 1962
“Central Park West”





D22. OPEN SPACE, No. 0, edited by Stan Persky
San Francisco, January 1964
[untitled] “This ocean, humiliating in its disguises…”
[not in archive]



D23. OPEN SPACE, No. 1, edited by Stan Persky
San Francisco, February 1964
“Sporting Life”





D24. OPEN SPACE, No. 2, edited by Stan Persky
San Francisco, February 1964
“This is Submitted for your Valentine Contest”, [untitled] “I hear a banging on the door of night…”
[not in archive]


D25. OPEN SPACE, No. 3, edited by Stan Persky
mags_openspace03San Francisco, March 1964
“Predictions”, [untitled] “The log in the fire…”, [untitled] “Finally the messages penetrate…”, “Dear Ferlinghetti”



D26. OPEN SPACE, No. 4, edited by Stan Persky
mags_openspace04tSan Francisco, 1964
[untitled] “Heroes eat soup…”, [untitled] “Smoke signals…”, [untitled] “A redwood forest…”, [untitled] “The whorship of beauty…”



D27. OPEN SPACE, No. 5, edited by Stan Persky
San Francisco, 1964
[untitled] “Pull down the shade of ruin, rain verse…”, [untitled] “If your mother’s mother had not riven, mother…”, [untitled] “What in sight do I have…”, [untitled] “It comes May and the summers renew themselves…”, [untitled] “Thanatos, the death-plant in the skull…”
[not in archive]

D28. OPEN SPACE, No. 6, edited by Stan Persky
San Francisco, June 1964
[untitled] “1st SF home rainout since. Bounce…”, [untitled] “The country is not very well defined…”, [untitled] “I squint my eyes to cry…”, [untitled] “The metallurgical analysis of the stone that…”

D29. OPEN SPACE, No. 7, edited by Stan Persky
San Francisco, 1964
“Love Poems”, “Protestant Letter”
[not in archive]




D30. OPEN SPACE, No. 8, edited by Stan Persky
mags_openspace08San Francisco, 1964
“Intermission I”, “Intermission II”, “Intermission III”, “Transformations I”, “Transformation II”, “Transformations III”



D31. OPEN SPACE, No. 9, edited by Stan Persky
San Francisco, 1964
“Morphemicks”
[not in archive]




D32. OPEN SPACE, No. 10, edited by Stan Persky
San Francisco, 1964
“Phonemics”





D33. OPEN SPACE, No. 11, edited by Stan Persky
San Francisco, 1964
“Graphemics 1-5”
[not in archive]




D34. THE WIVENHOE PARK REVIEW, No. 1, edited by Thomas Clark and Andrew Crozier
mags_wivenhoe01Essex: University of Essex, 1965
“15 False Propositions about God”






D35. WORK, No. 2, edited by John Sinclair
Detroit: Artists Workshop Press, Fall 1965
“Graphemic #10”





D36. COW, No. 1, edited by Luther T. Cupp
mags_cow01San Francisco: Cow, 1965
“Dear Sister Mary”





D37. WHE’RE, No.1, edited by Ron Caplan
Detroit: Artists’ Workshop, Summer 1966
“Lament for the Makers”, “The Scroll-work on the Casket”, “Dover Beach”, “Postscript”, “The Birds”, “The Birth of Venus”

D38. O’ER, No. 2, edited by David Sandberg
mags_oar02San Francisco, December 1966
from After Lorca: “Buster Keaton Rides Again: A Sequel”




D39. THE PACIFIC NATION, No. 1, edited by Robin Blaser
mags_pacific01Vancouver, June 1967
“A Poem to the Reader of the Poem”





D40. FLOATING BEAR, No. 33
Brooklyn, 1967
“The Bridge Game”, “Lives of the Philosophers: Diogenes”

D41. FLOATING BEAR, No. 34
Brooklyn, 1967
“The Day Five Thousand Fish Died in the Charles River”

D42. COLLECTION, No. 1, edited by Peter Riley
mags_collection01Sussex, March 1968
“The Red Wheelbarrow”





D43. IRON, No. 7
British Columbia, 1969
“Ode for Walt Whitman”

D44. TISH, No.44, Issue D, edited by Karen Tallman
Vancouver, February 1969
“Five Variations on the Earth”

D45. WRITING, No. 2
Vancouver, 1970
“Admonitions”

D46. BOSS, No. 4
New York: Boss Magazine, 1970

D47. CATERPILLAR, No. 12
Sherman Oaks, July 1970

D48. IS, No. 8, edited by Victor Coleman
Toronto: Coach House Press, 1970

D49. THE HARRIS REVIEW, edited by Harris Schiff
New York: Harris Review, baseball season 1971
[untitled] “The oaks…”, [untitled] “With fifteen cents and that I could get a…”

D50. IO, No. 10 Baseball Issue, edited by Richard Grossinger 
Cape Elizabeth, ME: IO Publications, 1971

D51. STOOGE 6, Editor: Geoff Young and Allen Schiller
Albuquerque, 1972
[untitled] “These big trucks drive…”

D52. SHOCKS, Double Issue 3/4, edited by Stephen Vincent
March 1974 

from “After Lorca”

D53. MANROOT, No. 10, Spicer issue
Fall-Winter 1974

D54. ADVENTURES IN POETRY, No. 12, edited by Larry Fagin
mags_adventuresp12New York: The Poetry Project, Summer 1975
“Babel”, “Dardenella”, “Lives of the Philosophers: Diogenes”, [untitled] “Lack of oxygen…”, [untitled] “In- / Visible zombies…”, “Spider Song”


D55. THE CAPILANO REVIEW, No. 8/9, edited by Pierre Coupey 
Vancouver: Capilano College, 1975

D56. TELEPHONE, No. 10, edited Maureen Owen 
New York: Telephone Books Press, 1975
“Five Variations for K.”

D57. NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, 23
November 1975

D58. PARNASSUS: POETRY IN REVIEW
Spring-Summer 1976

D59. IO, No. 24, edited by Kevin Kerran and Richard Grossinger
Ann Arbor: North Atlantic Books, 1977
“Four Poems for the St. Louis Sporting News”

D60. BOUNDARY 2, No. 6,  edited by William V. Spanos
SUNY, Binghamton, Fall 1977
“A Plan for a Book on Tarot”

D61. ACTS, No. 6, A Book of Correspondences for Jack Spicer
1986

D62. IRONWOOD, Vol. 14, Issue 2, No. 28, edited by Michael Cuddihy
Tucson: Ironwood Press, Fall 1986

D63. O-BLEK, No. 10, edited by Peter Gizzi and Connell McGrath
Stockbridge: The Garlic Press, Fall 1991
“For Kids”, “Spider Song”

D64. LIFT, Nos. 10/11, edited by Joseph Torra
Somerville: Lift, 1992

D65. EXACT CHANGE YEARBOOK, No. 1
1995


Further Reading:

1. Jack Spicer by Edward Halsey Foster (Boise, Idaho : Boise State University, c1991)

2. Poet be like God: Jack Spicer and the Berkeley Renaissance by Kevin Killian & Lewis Ellingham (Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press, 1998)

3. The House That Jack Built: The Collected Lectures of Jack Spicer, ed. Peter Gizzi (Hanover, NH: University Press of New England, 1998)


Online Resources:

Academy of American Poets
Book Forum
Jacket Magazine
Penn Sound
Poetry Foundation
University of Buffalo 


References Consulted:

Clay, Steven and Rodney Phillips. A SECRET LOCATION ON THE LOWER EAST SIDE: Adventures in Writing, 1960-1980
New York: New York Public Library / Granary Books, 1998

Dorbin, Sanford. A CHECKLIST OF THE PUBLISHED WRITING OF JACK SPICER
Sacramento: California Librarian, October 1970

Johnston, Alastair. A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE AUERHAHN PRESS & ITS SUCCESSOR DAVE HASELWOOD BOOKS
Berkeley: Poltroon Press, 1976

Johnston, Alastair. A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE WHITE RABBIT PRESS
Berkeley: Poltroon Press, 1985

Lepper, Gary M. A BIBLIOGRAPHICAL INTRODUCTION TO SEVENTY-FIVE MODERN AMERICAN AUTHORS
Berkeley: Serendipity Books, 1976

Four Seasons Foundation

Donald Merriam Allen (Iowa, 1912 – San Francisco, August 29, 2004) was an influential editor, publisher, and translator of contemporary American literature. He is perhaps best known for his project The New American Poetry 1945-1960 (Grove Press, 1960), a seminal anthology that introduced a revolutionary new generation of postwar poetry that was to change the course of American literature.

In 1960, Allen moved from New York to San Francisco, where he established Grey Fox and the Four Seasons Foundation, two significant literary presses where he continued to publish work from Beat, San Francisco Renaissance, Black Mountain, and New York School writers, as well as younger new voices.  Among the authors he published were Richard Brautigan, Robert Creeley, Edward Dorn, Robert Duncan, Jack Kerouac, Joanne Kyger, Philip Lamantia, Frank O’Hara, Charles Olson, John Rechy, Aaron Shurin, Gary Snyder, Jack Spicer, Lew Welch, and Philip Whalen.


Four Seasons Foundation, A Preliminary Checklist

1. Welch, Lew. STEP OUT ONTO THE PLANET
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation 1963
First edition, broadside, 9.5″ x 12.5″, 300 signed copies, offset printed. Printed for the occasion of a reading at Longshoreman’s Hall, San Francisco, June 12, 1964.

2. Whalen, Philip. THREE MORNINGS
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation 1963
First edition, broadside, 9.5″ x 12.5″, 300 signed copies, offset printed. Printed for the occasion of a reading at Longshoreman’s Hall, San Francisco, June 12, 1964.

3. Snyder, Gary. NANAO KNOWS
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation 1964
First edition, broadside, 9.5″ x 12.5″, 300 signed copies, offset printed. Printed for the occasion of a reading at Longshoreman’s Hall, San Francisco, June 12, 1964.

4. Olson, Charles. A BIBLIOGRAPHY ON AMERICA FOR ED DORN
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation (1964)
First edition, saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 6″ x 8″, 16 pages. Published as Writing 1

5. Dorn, Edward; Rumaker, Michael; Tallman, Warren. PROSE 1
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1964
First edition, saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 36 pages. Published as Writing 2

6. 12 POETS & 1 PAINTER
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1964
First edition, saddle-stapled printed and illustrated wrappers, 32 pages. Contributors include: LeRoi Jones, Joanne Kyger, Robert Creeley, Denise Levertov, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Robert Duncan, Gary Snyder, Lew Welch, Allen Ginsberg, Charles Olson, Max Finstein, Bruce Boyd. Illustrated by Jess Collins. Published as Writing 3

7. Loewinsohn, Ron. AGAINST THE SILENCES TO COME
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1965
— a. First edition, stapled wrappers, 7.75″ x 9.75″, 16 pages, 1000 copies.
— b. First edition, stapled wrappers, 7.75″ x 9.75″, 16 pages, 26 lettered and signed copies.
Published as Writing 4

8. Kyger, Joanne. THE TAPESTRY AND THE WEB
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1965
— a. First edition, paperback, 61 pages
— b. First edition, hardcover, 61 pages
Published as Writing 5

9. Olson, Charles. PROPRIOCEPTION
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1965
First edition, saddle-stapled wrappers, 18 pages. Published as Writing 6

10. Snyder, Gary. RIPRAP & COLD MOUNTAIN POEMS
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1965
First edition, stapled wrappers, 7.75″ x 9.75″, 50 pages. Published as Writing 7

11. Welch, Lew. HERMIT POEMS
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1965
— a. First edition, saddle-stapled wrappers, 16 pages, 974 copies.
— b. First edition, saddle-stapled wrappers, 16 pages, 26 numbered and signed copies.
Published as Writing 8

Snyder, Gary. SIX SECTIONS FROM MOUNTAINS AND RIVERS WITHOUT END
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1965
stapled wrappers, 42 pages, 1000 copies. Published as Writing 9

Koller, James. THE DOGS & OTHER DARK WOODS
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1966
— a. stapled wrappers, 33 pages, 1000 copies
— b. hardcover, 33 pages, 26 copies, numbered signed
Published as Writing 10

McClure, Michael. LOVE LION BOOK
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1966
— a. stapled wrappers, 24 pages, 1000 copies
— b. hardcover, 24 pages, 40 copies, numbered, signed
Published as Writing 11

Olson, Charles. STOCKING CAP: A STORY
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1966
stapled wrappers, 15 pages
Published as Writing 13

Olson, Charles. IN COLD HELL, IN THICKET
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1967
[Published as Writing 12 ?]

Brautigan, Richard. TROUT FISHING IN AMERICA
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1967
paperback
Published as Writing 14

Hadley, Drummond. THE WEBBING
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1967
stapled wrappers, 52 pages, 500 copies
Published as Writing 15

McClure, Michael. THE SERMONS OF JEAN HARLOW & THE CURSES OF BILLY THE KID
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation with Dave Haselwood Books, 1968
— a. First edition, saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 1200 copies, letterpress printed. Printed by Dave Haselwood.
— b. First edition, hardcover, 50 numbered and signed copies, letterpress printed. Printed by Dave Haselwood.
[Published as Writing 12 ?]

Olson, Charles. CAUSAL MYTHOLOGY
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1969
— a. paperback, 40 pages
— b. hardcover, 40 pages
Published as Writing 16

Blaser, Robin. CUPS
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1968
— a. First edition, saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 24 pages, 1000 copies, letterpress printed. Printed by Graham Mackintosh.
— b. First edition, hardcover, 24 pages, 40 numbered and signed copies, letterpress printed. Printed by Graham Mackintosh.
Published as Writing 17

McClure, Michael. GHOST TANTRAS
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1969
paperback. [Published as Writing 18 ?]

Upton, Charles. TIME RAID
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1969
stapled wrappers, 30 pages
Published as Writing 19

Brautigan, Richard. THE PILL VERSUS THE SPRINGHILL MINE DISASTER
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1968
— a. First edition, perfect-bound photo-illustrated wrappers, 108 pages.
— b. First edition, hardcover, 108 pages, 50 numbered and signed copies.
Published as Writing 20

Brautigan, Richard. IN WATERMELON SUGAR
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1968
— a. First edition, perfect-bound photo-illustrated wrappers, 5.25″ x 8″, 138 pages.
— b. First edition, hardcover, 138 pages, 50 numbered and signed copies.
Published as Writing 21

Creeley, Robert. A Quick Graph: Collected Notes & Essays
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1969
— a. First edition, perfect-bound photo-illustrated wrappers, 365 pages, 1000 copies
— b. hardcover, 365 pages
— c. hardcover in dust jacket, 365 pages
Published as Writing 22.

Creeley, Robert. THE CHARM: EARLY AND UNCOLLECTED POEMS
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1969
— a. First edition, perfect-bound photo-illustrated wrappers, 97 pages
— b. First edition, hardcover, 97 pages
— c. First edition, hardcover, 97 pages, 100 numbered and signed copies,
Published as Writing 23

Whalen, Philip. SEVERANCE PAY
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1970
— a. paperback, 51 pages
— b. paperback, 51 pages, 50 copies, numbered, signed
Published as Writing 24

Lamantia , Philip. THE BLOOD OF THE AIR
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1970
— a. paperback, 45 pages
— b. hardcover, 45 pages, 50 copies, numbered, signed
Published as Writing 25

Millward, Pamela. MOTHER: A NOVEL OF REVOLUTION
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1970
paperback, 57 pages
Published as Writing 26

Olson, Charles. POETRY AND TRUTH: THE BELOIT LECTURES
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1971
— a. paperback, 75 pages
— b. hardcover, 75 pages
Published as Writing 27

Schaff, David. THE MOON BY DAY
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1971
paperback, 114 pages
Published as Writing 28

Herd, Dale. EARLY MORNING WIND AND OTHER STORIES
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation, 1972
paperback
Published as Writing 29

Snyder, Gary. MANZANITA
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1972
paperback

Creeley, Robert. CONTEXTS OF POETRY: INTERVIEWS 1961-1971
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation, 1973
First edition, perfect-bound photo-illustrated wrappers, 214 pages.
Published as Writing 30

Conze, Edward. THE PERFECTION OF WISDOM IN EIGHT THOUSAND LINES AND ITS VERSE SUMMARY
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation 1973
Published as Wheel Series, 1

Olson, Charles. ADDITIONAL PROSE: A BIBLIOGRAPHY ON AMERICA, PROPRIOCEPTION, & OTHER NOTES & ESSAYS
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation, 1974
— a. paperback, 109 pages
— b. hardcover, 109 pages
Published as Writing 31

Lamantia, Philip. TOUCH OF THE MARVELOUS
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation, 1974
— a. paperback, 47 pages
— b. hardcover, 47 pages
Published as Writing 32

Whalen, Philip. THE KINDNESS OF STRANGERS: POEMS 1969-1974
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation, 1976
paperback, 57 pages
Published as Writing 33

Dorn, Edward. THE COLLECTED POEMS 1956-1974
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation, 1975
— a. paperback, 277 pages
— b. hardcover, 277 pages
Published as Writing 34

Olson, Charles. MUTHOLOGOS; COLLECTED LETTERS & INTERVIEWS 
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation, 1979
— a. paperback, 230 pages, 2 volumes
— b. hardcover, 230 pages, 2 volumes
Published as Writing 35

Olson, Charles. THE FIERY HUNT AND OTHER PLAYS
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation, 1977
paperback, 125 pages
Published as Writing 36

Whalen, Philip. OFF THE WALL: INTERVIEWS WITH PHILIP WHALEN
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation, 1978
paperback, 88 pages
Published as Writing 37

Dorn, Edward. INTERVIEWS
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation, 1980
paperback, 117 pages
Published as Writing 38

Creeley, Robert. WAS THAT A REAL POEM & OTHER ESSAYS
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation 1979
— a. paperback, 149 pages
— b. hardcover, 149 pages
Published as Writing 39

Dorn, Edward. VIEWS
Bolinas: Four Seasons Foundation, 1980
— a. paperback, 142 pages
— b. hardcover, 142 pages
Published as Writing 40

Gluck, Robert. ELEMENTS OF A COFFEE SERVICE
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1982
paperback, 97 pages
Published as Writing 41

Whalen, Philip. HEAVY BREATHING: POEMS 1967-1980
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1983
paperback, 207 pages
Published as Writing 42

Shurin, Aaron. THE GRACES
San Francisco: Four Seasons Foundation, 1983
paperback, 72 pages
Published as Writing 42


References consulted:

Bohn, Dave. OYEZ: THE AUTHORIZED CHECKLIST
Berkeley: n.p., 1997

Hawley, Bob. CHECKLISTS OF SEPARATE PUBLICATIONS OF POETS AT THE FIRST BERKELEY POETRY CONFERENCE 1965
Berkeley: Oyez/Cody’s, 1965

Johnston, Alastair. A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE AUERHAHN PRESS & ITS SUCCESSOR DAVE HASELWOOD BOOKS
Berkeley: Poltroon Press, 1976

Lepper, Gary M. A BIBLIOGRAPHICAL INTRODUCTION TO SEVENTY-FIVE MODERN AMERICAN AUTHORS
Berkeley: Serendipity Books, 1976