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Charles Bukowski: Contributions to Periodicals, 1970-1979

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SECTION D-2:
This index includes contributions to periodicals of poems and stories from 1970 to 1979*.

* Note: This is a work in progress and as such the sequence within years is alphabetical until more data is available

– – – 1970 – – – >

ADAM, Vol. 14, No. 2 (1970)

ADAM, Vol. 14, No. 7 (1970)

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIAN, Vol. 31, No. 4, edited by Don Kunitz
Sacramento: California Librarian, October 1970
“The Poetry Reading”
[library photocopy]




CANDID PRESS (1970)

CHICAGO REVIEW, Vol. 22, No. 1, edited by Harry Foster
mags_chicago2201Chicago: Chicago Review, Autumn 1970
“All Right, so Camus Had to Give Speeches before the Academies and Get His Ass Killed in a Car-Wreck”, “The Old Woman”



COTYLEDON, No. 2
Traverse City: Coyteldon Press, 1970
“A Hero’s Death”, “A Little Bit of Excitement”, “An Interesting Night”, “Robert Ryan: American Matador”, “Song”, “The Virgins of The Bulls”, “Those Sons of Bitches”

EPOS, Vol. 22, No. 2, edited by Will Tullos and Evelyn Thorne
mags_epos2202Crescent City: Epos, Winter 1970-71
“Blues Song”





EVERGREEN REVIEW, Vol. 14, No. 74, edited by Barney Rosset
New York: Evergreen Review, January 1970
“The Day We Talked about James Thurber”

EVERGREEN REVIEW, Vol. 14, No. 79, edited by Barney Rosset
New York: Evergreen Review, June 1970
“Soup, Cosmos and Tears”

FLING (1970)

GHOST DANCE, No. 12, edited by Hugh Fox
mags_ghostdance12East Lansing: Ghost Dance Press, (1970)
“The Poet’s Muse”





HEARSE, No. 14, edited by E. V. Griffith
Eureka: Hearse Press, 1970
“Sheets”





JEOPARDY, Vol. 6, edited by Carl Waluconis
mags_jeopardy06Bellingham: Jeopardy, March 1970
“The White Poets”, “The Black Poets”, “Excerpts from Short Non-Moon Shots to Nowhere”




KNIGHT, Vol. 7, No. 12
Los Angeles: Sirkay Publishing, 1970
“The Great Zen Wedding”

KNIGHT, Vol. 8, No. 5
Los Angeles: Sirkay Publishing, September 1970
“Nut Ward Just East of Hollywood”

KNIGHT, Vol. 8, No. 7
Los Angeles: Sirkay Publishing, 1970
“Registered Letter” (excerpt from Post Office)

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 45
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1970

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 49
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1970

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 54
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1970

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 55
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1970

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 57
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., Jun 12 to 27, 1970
“New Mexico”

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 60
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1970
“Love it or Leave it”

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 61
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1970
“All the Pussy We Want”

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 62
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., Aug 21-Sep 3, 1970
“Six Inches”

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 63
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., Sep 4-17, 1970
“I Think of the Little Men”

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 64
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., Sep 18-Oct 1, 1970
“An Evil Town”

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 67
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1970
“The Loner”

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 68
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1970

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 69
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1970

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 70
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1970
“The White Beard”

NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF POETRY (1970)

NOTES FROM UNDERGROUND, No. 3, edited by John Bryan
San Francisco: Underground Press, 1970
“Should We Burn Uncle Sam’s Ass?”

WHAT THERE IS LEFT TO UNDERSTAND ABOUT A LIGHT THAT IS NOT ABLE TO BE THERE
Sacramento: Runcible Spoon 1970
“Dooby Do Do Do”, “Shoot The Goat Through The Head And Paint The Bones Green”, “The Shit Shits”, “The Vast Area Of Space Nothingness With With Snakes Crawling Through You And Everything”

SOUNDINGS, Vol. 2, No. 1, edited by Donald E. Fitch
mags_soundings0201Santa Barbara: University of California, May 1970
“The Miracle”, “The Immortal Bombs, The Stinking Feet of God be Quiet”, “The Flower Lover”




SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LIT SCENE, Vol. 1, No. 1, edited by William J. Robson
mags_socallit0101Long Beach: Southern California Lit Scene, December 1970
“The Wailing Wall”




STATEMENT, No. 28, edited by Roger Margolis
mags_statement28Los Angeles: California State College, May 1970
“On to Rome”





STEPPENWOLF, No. 4, edited by Philip Boatright
mags_steppenwolf04Omaha: Steppenwolf, Autumn, 1970
“Quits”





STOOGE, No. 5, edited by Laura Chester and Geoffrey Young
Oconomowoc Lake: Stooge, 1970
“An Answer to a Critic of Sorts”

WORMWOOD REVIEW, , Vol. 10, No. 1, Issue 37, edited by Marvin Malone
Stockton: The Wormwood Review, 1970
“One More Good One. Why Not?”, “Moonlight Ride”




WORMWOOD REVIEW, Vol. 10, No. 4, Issue 38, edited by Marvin Malone
Stockton: The Wormwood Review, 1970
“Down Like Stairways, Up Like Smoke”, “Another Academy”




WORMWOOD REVIEW, , Vol. 10, No. 4, Issue 39, edited by Marvin Malone
Stockton: The Wormwood Review, 1970
“A Correction To A Lady Of Poetry”, “A Warm Afternoon Just Off Sunset Boulevard”, “Boil Near Left Elbow”, “Yes”



WORMWOOD REVIEW, Vol. 10, No. 4, Issue 40, edited by Marvin Malone
Stockton: The Wormwood Review, 1970
“16 Jap Machine Gun Bullets”, “When All The Animals Lie Down”




– – – 1971 – – – >

ABYSS, Vol. 3, No. 1 (1971)

ADAM, Vol. 15, No. 3 (1971)

ADAM, Vol. 15, No. 5 (1971)

ADAM, Vol. 8, No. 11 (1971)

BEAR, No. 1, edited by A. P. Russo
Los Angeles: Bear,  1971
“The Answer”, “The Flu”

CRAZY HORSE, No. 9
Marshall: Southwest Minnesota State College, 1971
“That One”

EAST VILLAGE OTHER, Vol. 6, No. 11
New York: East Village Other Inc, 1971
“Swastika”

FLING, (1971)

FLING, (1971)

FLING, Vol. 14, No. 4 (1971)

FLING, Vol. 14, No. 5 (1971)

HALF N’ HALF, (1971)

HANGING LOOSE, No. 15
Brooklyn: Hanging Loose Press, 1971
“A Threat to My Immortality”, “The Garbageman”

HARRISON STREET REVIEW, No. 2 (1971)

HEARSE, No. 15, edited by E. V. Griffith
Eureka: Hearse Press, 1971
“The End of The Funhouse”, “Vallejo”

INTREPID, No. 18/19, edited by Allen De Loach
Buffalo: Intrepid Press, 1971
“A Blurb”, “That Liberating Moment”

INVISIBLE CITY, No. 1, edited by Paul Vangelisti Paul and John McBride
Fairfax: Red Hill Press, 1971
“5 Men in Black Passing My Window”, “Ah”, “Here”, “Rolled Again”, “Songs of Death”, “Style”, “The Bums at Phillipe’s”, “The Last Days of The Suicide Kid”, “You Might As Well Kiss Your Ass Goodbye”, “Zoo”

INVISIBLE CITY, No. 2, edited by Paul Vangelisti Paul and John McBride
Fairfax: Red Hill Press, 1971
“A Most Dark Night In April”, “Drinking”, “Last Act”, “The American Flag Shirt”, “Upon 2 Deaths”

INVISIBLE CITY, No. 3, edited by Paul Vangelisti Paul and John McBride
Fairfax: Red Hill Press, 1971
“2 Carnations”, “Pleasure Song”, “The Shower”, “The Writer”

LAUGH LITERARY AND MAN THE HUMPING GUNS, Vol. 1, No. 3, edited by Charles Bukowski and Neeli Cherry
Los Angeles: Hatchetman Press, 1971
“Bukowski To Cherry”, “The Time I Knocked Out Ernest Hemingway And Was Discovered As A New Literary Giant”

LEMMING, No. 1 (1971)

MADRONA, No. 2, edited by J.K. Osborne, John Levy, and Vassilis Zambaras
Seattle: Gemini Press, 1971
“The Best Love Poem I Can Write at the Moment”

MANO MANO, No. 2, edited by Larry Lake
Denver, Colorado: Bowery Press, 1971
“Girl In A Miniskirt Reading The Bible Outside My Window”, “Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha, Ha Ha”, “The Angels Of Sunday”

MEATBALL, No. 8 (1971)

MEDITERRANEAN REVIEW, Vol. 1, No. 3, edited by Robert DeMaria
Orient: Mediterranean Review, 1971
“Poem For An X-Bank Clerk”, “The Wine And The Cantos”

NEW YORK QUARTERLY, No. 7 (1971)

NEW YORK QUARTERLY, No. 8 (1971)

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 71
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1971

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 73
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1971

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 77
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1971

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 78
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., Apr 1-15, 1971

NOLA EXPRESS, No. 81
New Orleans: Southern Louisiana Media Corp., 1971

PIX, Vol. 3 (1971)

PULSE, No. 4, edited by Norm Moser
Santa Fe: Illuminations Press, Summer-Fall 1971
“A Need For Glue”, “Cancer Of The Eyeball”, “The Grammar Of Life”

QUETZAL, Vol. 1, No. 3 (1971)

ROGUE, No. 29 (1971)

SECOND AEON, No. 13, edited by Peter Finch
Cardiff: Second Aeon Publications, 1971
“Poem For Dante”, “Slim Killers”, “The Conditions”

THE MT. ALVERNO REVIEW, (1971)

THE SERIF, Vol. 8, No. 4, edited by Alex Glidzen and Dean H. Keller
Kent: Kent State University, 1971
“Untitled Essay on d.a. levy”

THROB, No. 1, edited by F. A. Nettlebeck
Manhattan Beach: Horsehead Nebula Press, 1971
“Bug”, “Summer”, “The Elephants”

THROB, No. 2, edited by F. A. Nettlebeck
Manhattan Beach: Horsehead Nebula Press, 1971
“Charles Bukowski Answers 10 Easy Questions”

UNMUZZLED OX, Vol. 1, No. 1, edited by Michael Andre
New York: Unmuzzled Ox, 1971
“Poem”, “Tragedy Is My Bacon”

VAGABOND, No. 10, edited by John Bennett
San Francisco: Vagabond Press, 1971

VAGABOND, No. 11, edited by John Bennett
San Francisco: Vagabond Press, 1971

VAGABOND, No. 12, edited by John Bennett
Redwood City: Vagabond Press, 1971

WORMWOOD REVIEW, No. 41 (1971)

WORMWOOD REVIEW, No. 42 (1971)

WORMWOOD REVIEW, No. 43 (1971)

WORMWOOD REVIEW, No. 44 (1971)

– – – 1972 – – – >

ADAM, Vol. 16, No. 1 (1972)
AMPHORA, No. 8 (1972)
ANTHOLOGY OF L.A. POETS, (1972)
BACHY, Vol. 1, No. 1 (1972)
BALONEY STREET, No. 3/4 (1972)
BALONEY STREET, No. 3/4 (1972)
BARTLEBY’S REVIEW, Vol. 1, No. 1 (1972)
CALIFORNIA STATE POETRY SOCIETY QUARTERLY, Vol. 1, No. 2 (1972)
CHICAGO REVIEW, Vol. 24, No. 3 (1972)
CORDUROY, Vol. 1, No. 3 (1972)
DOGTOWN, No. 1 (1972)
EVENT, Vol. 1, No. 3 (1972)
EVENT, Vol. 2, No. 1 (1972)
EVENT, Vol. 2, No. 2 (1972)
FERVENT VALLEY, No. 1 (1972)
FERVENT VALLEY, No. 2 (1972)
FLING, No. 3 (1972)
FLING, No. 5 (1972)
FLING, Vol. 14, No. 6 (1972)
HALF N’ HALF, (1972)
HARRISON STREET REVIEW, No. 3 (1972)
HEARSE, No. 17 (1972)
INTREPID, No. 23/24 (1972)
INVISIBLE CITY, No. 4 (1972)
INVISIBLE CITY, No. 7 (1972)
KNIGHT, Vol. 9, No. 7 (1972)
LOS ANGELES FREE PRESS, (1972)
LOS ANGELES FREE PRESS, (1972)
MAG, No. 2 (1972)
MAG, No. 4 (1972)
MAGAZINE, No. 5 (1972)
MINDSCAPES, (1972)
NEW YORK QUARTERLY, No. 10 (1972)
NEW YORK QUARTERLY, No. 12 (1972)
NEW YORK QUARTERLY, No. 9 (1972)
NOLA EXPRESS, No. 103 (1972)
NOLA EXPRESS, No. 104 (1972)
NOLA EXPRESS, No. 108 (1972)
NOLA EXPRESS, No. 113 (1972)
NOLA EXPRESS, No. 115 (1972)
NOLA EXPRESS, No. 116 (1972)
NOLA EXPRESS, No. 117 (1972)
NOLA EXPRESS, No. 119 (1972)
NOLA EXPRESS, No. 99 (1972)
PEBBLE, No. 9 (1972)
PIX, Vol. 4, No. 5 (1972)
PIX, Vol. 4, No. 7 (1972)
PIX, Vol. 4, No. 8 (1972)
PURE SMUTTE, No. 1 (1972)
SAN FRANCISCO BOOK REVIEW, No. 22 (1972)
SECOND AEON, No. 14 (1972)
SECOND AEON, No. 16/17 (1972)
SECOND COMING, Vol. 1, No. 2 (1972)
SECOND COMING, Vol. 1, No. 3 (1972)
SILVER, (1972)
STONECLOUD, No. 1 (1972)
THE, No. 13 (1972)
THE LITTLE MAGAZINE, Vol. 6, No. 1 (1972)
THE LITTLE MAGAZINE, Vol. 6, No. 2 & 3 (1972)
THE VENICE POETRY COMPANY PRESENTS, (1972)
UNMUZZLED OX, Vol. 1, No. 2 (1972)
UNMUZZLED OX, Vol. 1, No. 4 (1972)
VAGABOND, No. 13 (1972)
VAGABOND, No. 15 (1972)
WORMWOOD REVIEW, No. 45 (1972)
WORMWOOD REVIEW, No. 46 (1972)
WORMWOOD REVIEW, No. 47 (1972)
WORMWOOD REVIEW, No. 48 (1972)

COW (the magazine)

Inspired by Stan Persky’s OPEN SPACE, Luther T. Cupp edited COW, which ran for three issues from 1965-1966. Cupp was nicknamed “Link” by Jack Spicer and went by the name Link Martin.

mags_cow01

 

Contributors to this short-lived North Beach magazine include:  Lawrence (Larry) Fagin, Stan Persky, Robin Blaser, George Stanley, Harold Dull, Joanne Kyger, Jack Spicer, Ronnie Primack, and others.
(further reading…)

Cow

Inspired by Stan Persky’s OPEN SPACE, Luther T. Cupp edited COW, which ran for three issues from 1965-1966. Cupp was nicknamed “Link” by Jack Spicer and went by the name Link Martin.

1. COW, The San Francisco Magazine of Livestock, No. 1, Cow Soup Issue, edited by Luther T. Cupp
mags_cow01(San Francisco): (Cow) (1965)
First edition, side stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 11 pages, mimeograph.

Contributors: Doug Palmer, Deneen Brown, Lawrence Fagin, Stan Persky, Robin Blaser, J. Mac Innis, George Stanley, Harold Dull, Joanne Kyger, Jack Spicer, Ronnie Primack, Link.

2. COW, The Magazine of Afro-Judeo Culture, No. 2, The Un-escalation Issue, edited by Luther T. Cupp
mags_cow02(San Francisco): (Cow) (1965)
First edition, side stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 11 pages, mimeograph.

Contributors: Jim Thurber, Robin Blaser, Stan Persky, Bill Brodecky, Mike Hannon, Larry Fagin, Geoff Brown, Michael Ratcliffe, Joanne Kyger, Jamie MacInnis, Luis Garcia, J.C. Alexander, Gail Dusenbery, Hune Voelcker, George Stanley.

3. COW, No. 3, Pregnant Cow Issue, edited by Luter T. Cupp
mags_cow03(San Francisco): (Cow) (1966)
First edition, side stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 11 pages, mimeograph.

Contributors: Bill Deemer and Andrew Hoyem, Stephen Mindel, Marga NewComb, Robin Blaser, Michael Ratcliffe, H.M. Wickenheiser, Jim Semark, Helen Adam, Gordon Gatom, Mike Hannon, SMN.

Gryphon

Born on January 2, 1922, Richard Rubenstein began his literary career in a local prep school when he won a poetry contest. Associated with the Beat Poets in the San Francisco Bay Area, Rubenstein worked to found and edit several small press poetry journals – Neurotica, first published in spring of 1948; Inferno, in late 1949; and Gryphon, in spring of 1950. In Gryphon he published early works of Robert Creeley and Denise Levertov, as well as the established authors Henry Treece, D.H. Emblem, e.e. cummings, and Cid Corman. He himself published a small chapbook, Beer and Angels, and produced a long manuscript of collected poems which went unpublished. Rubenstein’s health deteriorated because of his long-standing nervous condition and the alcohol he drank to combat it. He died on Yom Kippur in 1958.

1. GRYPHON, No. 1, edited by Richard Rubinstein
San Francisco: Gryphon, Spring 1950

2. GRYPHON, No. 2, edited by Richard Rubinstein
San Francisco: Gryphon, Fall 1950

3. GRYPHON, No. 3, edited by Richard Rubinstein
San Francisco: Gryphon, Spring 1951

Hearse

HEARSE, A VEHICLE USED TO CONVEY THE DEAD ran for 17 issues and was published by E. V. Griffith’s Hearse Press from 1957 until 1972.

According to Griffith in SHEAF, HEARSE, COFFIN, POETRY NOW: A HISTORY (Hearse Press, 1996):
“In format, HEARSE was a center-stapled booklet 5.5″ x 8.5″ page size; the wire staples which held the propensity for rusting. The Rhino Bristol cover stock ran through several different colors — blue, gray, green, yellow, and (much later) pink — with the name in black ink. (A few issues varied this by using white cover stock, and a colored ink.) Its appearance owed much to — in fact, almost copied — Larsen’s EXISTARIA.”

1. HEARSE, No. 1, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse01Eureka: Hearse Press, 1957
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 24 pages, 100 copies, offset.

Contents: poems by Joel Oppenheimer, Robert Creeley, Raymond Souster, Larry Eigner, Jonathan Williams, Langston Hughes, Louis Dudek, Gil Orlovitz, David Cornel DeJong, Bariss Mills, Judson Crews and 11 other poets; artwork by Kenneth Lawrence Beaudoin, and Lawrence Ferlinghetti, an excerpt from the autobiography of Dick Stud, and a collage by Mercy Pennis Hyman.

2. HEARSE, No. 2, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse02Eureka: Hearse Press, 1957
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 24 pages, offset.

Contents: poems by Gil Orlovitz, Langston Hughes, Robert Creeley, Charles Bukowski, Joel Oppenheimer, Lloyd Zimpel, Richard Brautigan, Theodore Enslin, John Forbis, Alden A. Nolan, Raymond Souster and 16 other poets; artwork by E. V. Griffith, and Henry Miller, and a short story by Harold Witt.

3. HEARSE, No. 3, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse03Eureka: Hearse Press, 1958
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 32 pages, offset.

Contents: poems by Kenneth Rexroth, Langston Hughes, Alden A. Nolan, Gil Orlovitz, Judson Crews, David Cornel DeJong, Carol Ely Harper, Mason Jordan Mason, Richard Brautigan, Raymond Souster, Clarence Major, and 5 other poets; artwork by Kenneth Lawrence Beaudoin, and Ben Tibbs, and a short story by R. T. Taylor.

4. HEARSE, No. 4, edited by E. V. Griffith
Eureka: Hearse Press, 1958
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 16 pages, offset.

Contents: poems by Russell Atkins, Charles Bukowski, Maxine Cassin, Paul Blackburn, Mortimer Tission, and 10 other poets; artwork by E. V. Griffith, and Farley Gay, and a short story by Mary Graham Lund.

5. HEARSE, No. 5, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse05Eureka: Hearse Press, 1959
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 20 pages, offset.

Contents: poems by Allen Ginsburg, Paul Blackburn, Robert Creeley, LeRoi Jones, Joel Oppenheimer, David Cornel DeJong, Frederick Eckman, Alden A. Nolan, Walter Lowenfels, and 8 other poets; artwork by E. V. Griffith.

6. HEARSE, No. 6, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse06Eureka: Hearse Press, 1960
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 20 pages, offset.

Contents: poems by George Scarborough, Felix Stefanie, Russell Atkins, Gil Orlovitz, Jon Barkley Hart, Maxine Cassin, Judson Crews, and 5 other poets; artwork by E. V. Griffith, and Bob Brown, a short story by Clarence Major, and a excerpt from the autobiography of Raven Lunatick.

7. HEARSE, No. 7, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse07Eureka: Hearse Press, 1960
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 16 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by David Cornel DeJong, Langston Hughes, Charles Bukowski, Raymond Souster, Patricia Hooper, Larry Eigner, Gil Orlovitz, Jack Anderson, Diane DiPrima, Judson Crews, and 8 other poets, and a short story by Mary Graham Lund.

8. HEARSE, No. 8, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse08Eureka: Hearse Press, 1961
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 16 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Charles Bukowski, Jonathan Williams, Gil Orlovitz, Frederick Eckman, Maxine Cassin, Russell Atkins, and 11 other poets, and a short story by Irving Halperin.

9. HEARSE, No. 9, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse09Eureka: Hearse Press, 1961
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 16 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Paul Blackburn, Richard Brautigan, Gil Orlovitz, Robert S. Ward, George Scarborough, and 4 other poets.

10. HEARSE, No. 10, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse10Eureka: Hearse Press, 1969
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 32 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Winfield Towny Scott, Charles Bukowski, Marge Piercy, Harold Witt, William Childress, Maxine Cassin, Dave Etter, Theodore Enslin, Carroll Arnett, and 9 other poets.

11. HEARSE, No. 11, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse11Eureka: Hearse Press, 1969
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 48 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by William Childress, Robert Bly, Charles Bukowski, Hayden Carruth, Kathleen Fraser, Larry Eigner, Lyn Lifshin, Harold Witt, Vern Rutsala, Robert Mezey, Gerg Kuzma, Thomas Mayer, Nancy, Willard, George Hitchcock, Keith Wilson, Rochelle OWents, Dave Etter, Carroll Arnett, Peter Wild, Terry Stokes, and 12 other poets.

12. HEARSE, No. 12, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse12Eureka: Hearse Press, 1970
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 44 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Diane Wakowski, Robert Mezey, John Haines, Dave Etter, Charles Simic, William Childress, Charles Wright, Michael Benedikt, William Matthews, David Ingatow, Harold Witt, Rochelle Owens, David Antin, Robert Gershon, and 17 other poets.

13. HEARSE, No. 13, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse13Eureka: Hearse Press, 1970
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 52 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Marge Piercy, Charles Simic, Marvin Applewhite, Jack Anderson, Michael Benedikt, Howard McCord, Dave Etter, Nancy Willard, Lewis Warsh, Gerard Malanga, Harold Bond, Keith Wilson, Morton Marcus, John Gill, and 11 other poets.

14. HEARSE, No. 14, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse14Eureka: Hearse Press, 1970
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 52 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by James Schevill, Philip Levine, Nancy Willard, Marvin Bell, Larry Eigner, Stephen Sandy, James Welch, Charles Bukowski, Robert Peters, William Childress, Marge Piercy, Harold Witt, James Tate, Adrien Stoutenburg, Peter Wild, Carolyn Stoloff, Terry Stokes, Harley Elliott, and 20 other poets.

15. HEARSE, No. 15, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse15Eureka: Hearse Press, 1971
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 64 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Hayden Caruth, William Matthews, Marge Piercy, Charles Bukowski, John Woods, Herbert Scott, Gary Gilder, William Childress, Greg Kuzma, Theodore Enslin, Albert Goldbarth, Jack Anderson, Peter Wild, Michael G. Culross, H.L. Van Brunt, Lyn Lifshin, Norman Dubie, and 30 other poets.

16. HEARSE, No. 16, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse16Eureka: Hearse Press, 1971
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 64 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Harold Witt, Daniel Hoffman, Philip Booth, Ted Kooser, David Wagoner, William Matthews, David Ingatow, Robert Mezey, Larry Levis, Paul Zimmer, Dave Etter, Carolyn Stoloff, Lyn Lifshin, Charles Edward Eaton, Ernest Kroll, David Hilton, Sonya Dorman, Robert Hershson, Terry Stokes, and 28 other poets.

17. HEARSE, No. 17, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse17Eureka: Hearse Press, 1972
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 88 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Charles Bukowski, Harold Norse, X.J. Kennedy, Robert Mezey, James Schevill, Charles Wright, John Woods, William Childress, Russell Edson, Peter Everyone, Colette Inez, Douglas Blazek, Thomas Lux, William Witherup, Robert Hershon, Peter Wild, Lyn Lifshin, Geof Hewitt, Dave Kelly, Stephen Dunn, William Hathaway, Adrien Stoutenburg, and 39 other poets.

Judson Crews

crews_bukJudson Crews, poet, editor, publisher, and book dealer, was born June 30, 1917, in Waco, Texas. Crews received both the B.A. (1941) and M.A. (1944) in Sociology from Baylor University, and during 1946-1947 studied fine arts at Baylor. In addition, Crews did graduate study at the University of Texas, El Paso in 1967. He has worked as an educator at Wharton County Junior College, New Mexico (1967-1970), the University of New Mexico, Gallup Branch (1971-1972), and at the University of Zambia (1974-1978). He has also been involved in social work. After two years in the U. S. Army Medical Corps during World War II, Crews moved his family and business, Motive Press, from Waco, Texas, to Taos, New Mexico, where he began his writing and publishing career in earnest.

Judson Crews was a prominent figure in the Southwest poetry scene as a poet, editor, and publisher of contemporary poetry and art magazines. Crews admittedly wrote under numerous pseudonyms. Of these pseudonyms, Willard Emory Betis, Trumbull Drachler, Cerise Farallon (Mrs. Trumbull Drachler, maiden name Lena Johnston), and Tobi Macadams have been clearly identified. In the instance of these, and possibly many other pseudonymous names, Crews created a fantasy world of writers to encompass, perhaps, the breadth of his literary ambitions.

Crews’ publishing activities began in earnest after his move from Texas to the Taos area. He started the Este Es Press in 1946, which remained in operation until 1966. The little magazines with which he was involved from 1940 to 1966 include The Deer and Dachshund, The Flying Fish, Motive, The Naked Ear, Poetry Taos, Suck-Egg Mule: A Recalcitrant Beast, Taos: A Deluxe Magazine of the Arts, and Vers Libre. Together with Scott Greer, he was co-editor of Crescendo: A Laboratory for Young America, and worked with Jay Waite on Gale. Crews published not only his own chapbooks and magazines but also those of his friends and colleagues, including the Zambian poet Mason Jordan Mason, among others. In conjunction with this printing activity, Crews operated the Motive Book Shop which became a focal point for the dissemination and advocacy of avant-garde poetry, important little magazines and literary reviews, as well as so-called pornographic materials. The material that Crews sold ranged from literary classics such as the works of D. H. Lawrence and Henry Miller, to hard-to-obtain domestic and foreign avant-garde journals, and nudist magazines. Crews was also a friend as well as an advocate of Henry Miller and continued to sell Miller’s works after they were banned in the United States.

 


A Select and limited sampling…

Mason Jordan Mason
THE YARDARM OF MURPHEY’S KITE
crews_theyardarmRanches of Taos: Motive Press, 1956
First edition, 4to., [48] pp. Introduction by Chris Bjerknes, “Mason Jordan Mason: An Appreciation”. White, plastic comb binding with decorated board covers. Photographs cut from magazines on both sides of covers, with title and author name letterpress printed in blue on front. Additional magazine images throughout. The images appear to come from nudist, girly, travel, and other magazines. Each copy presumably is unique. [Some have suggested that Mason Jordan Mason is a pseudonym for Judson Crews who admitedly used several pseudonyms. See biographical sketch.] 

Judson Crews, editor 
POETRY TAOS, Number One.
crews_poetrytaosRanches of Taos: n.p., 1957
First edition, 4to., [64] pp. White, plastic comb binding with decorated board covers. Photographs cut from magazines on both sides of covers, with title and author name letterpress printed in blue on front. Numerous similar leaves in text. The images appear to come from nudist, girly, travel, and other magazines. Each copy presumably is unique. Introduction by Judson Crews. Contributors include: Wolcott Ely, Gaston Criell, William Carlos Williams, Mason Jordan Mason, Robert Creeley, Robert Burdette, Max Fenstein, Hyacinthe Hill, Joseph Foster, Cerise Farallon, Judson Crews, Donn Cantonwine, Murry Moore, Wendell B. Anderson. 

Judson Crews 
TO WED BENEATH THE SUN.
crews_towed[Taos]: n.p., [1958]
First edition, 8vo., [28] pp. White, plastic comb binding with decorated board covers. Photographs cut from magazines on both sides of covers, with title and author name letterpress printed in blue on front, plus two similar leaves in text. The images appear to come from nudist, girly, travel, and other magazines. Each copy presumably is unique. 

Judson Crews 
THE FEEL OF SUN & AIR UPON HER BODY.
crews_thefeelEureka: Hearse Press, [1960]
First edition, 8vo., [32] pp. One of 125 unnumbered copies, published as the tenth chapbook in the HEARSE CHAPBOOK series. White, plastic comb binding with decorated board covers. Photographs cut from magazines on both sides of covers, with title and author name letterpress printed in green on front, plus two similar leaves in text. The images appear to come from nudist, girly, travel, and other magazines. Each copy presumably is unique. 

Judson Crews 
HERMES PAST THE HOUR.
crews_hermesTaos: Este Es Press, 1963
First edition, 8vo., [42] pp. White, plastic comb binding with decorated board covers. Photographs cut from magazines on both sides of covers, with title and author name letterpress printed in silver on front, plus two similar leaves in text. The images appear to come from nudist, girly, travel, and other magazines. Each copy presumably is unique. 

Judson Crews 
YOU MARK ANTHONY, NAVIGATOR UPON THE NILE.
crews_youmark[Taos]: n.p., [1964]
First edition, 8vo., [62] pp. One of 500 numbered copies, signed. White, plastic comb binding with decorated board covers. Photographs cut from magazines on both sides of covers, with title and author name letterpress printed in silver on front, plus two similar leaves in text. The images appear to come from nudist, girly, travel, and other magazines. Each copy presumably is unique. 


Further research and reading:

Biographical information


Reference consulted:

Wendell Anderson’s THE HEART’S PRECISION (Carson: Dumont Press, 1994).

Measure

wieners


“The three simple, almost starkly working-class issues of Measure followed glorious and overlooked “underground” poet John Wieners from Black Mountain College home to Boston, across country to San Francisco, and back to Boston again. In his years in San Francisco, from 1958 to 1960, Wieners attended (sometimes serving as host at his Scott Street apartment) the legendary Sunday afternoon poetry workshops of the charismatic poets Robert Duncan and Jack Spicer. Also present at the workshops were George Stanley, Harold Dull, Robin Blaser (The Pacific Nation), and many others…”
— from A Secret Location on the Lower East Side (Granary Books, 1998)

Measure, No. 1, edited by John Wieners
mags_measure01Boston: Measure, Summer 1957
Saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 48 pages, letterpress printed at the Press of Villiers Publications..

“Measure is edited by John Wieners. It will be issued with the four seasons only through your support… Please understand that the opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the city.”

Contributors:
Tom Balas – “Le Fou”
Charles Olson – “Le Bonheur!”, “The Charge”, “Spring”
Edward Marshall – “One:”, “Two:”
Robin Blaser – “Poem”, “Letters to Freud”, “Poem by the Charles River”
Edward Dorn – “The Rick of Green Wood”
Larry Eigner – “Millionem”, “Brink”
Frank O’Hara – “section 9 from Second Avenue”
Fielding Dawson – “Two Drawings”
Stephen Jonas – “Word on Measure”, “Expanded Word on Measure”
Michael Rumaker – “Father”
Gavin Douglas – “The Blanket”
Jack Spicer – “Song for Bird and Myself”
Jonathan Williams – “Two Poems for Whitman, the Husbandman”
Robert Duncan – “The Propositions”

Measure, No. 2, edited by John Wieners
mags_measure2San Francisco: Measure, Winter 1958
Saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 64 pages, letterpress printed at the Press of Villiers Publications.

“Magick is for the ones who ball, i.e. throw across”

Contributors:
Michael Rumaker – “The use of the Unconscious”
Robin Blaser – “The Hunger of Sound”
Robert Creeley – “Juggler’s Thot”
Michael Rumaker – “8 Dreams”
Jack Kerouac – “4 Choruses”
Charles Olson – “Descensus Spiritus No. 1”
Robert Duncan – “The Maiden”
Robert Creeley – “They Say”, “She Went to Say”
Jack Kerouac – “235th Chorus”
Edward Dorn – “Notes from the Fields”
Robert Duncan – “The Dance”
Stuart Z. Perkoff – “Feats of Death, Feasts of Love”
V. R. Lang – “The Recidivists”
Gregory Corso – “Yaaaah”
James Broughton – “Feathers or Lead”
Michael McClure – “The Magazine Cover”, “One & Two”
Robert Creeley – “The Tunnel”, “Just Friends”
Richard Duerden – “Musica No. 3”
Stephen Jonas – “Books 3 & 4 from a Long Poem”

Measure, No. 3, edited by John Wieners
mags_measure03Milton: Measure, Winter 1962
Saddle-stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 36 pages, letterpress printed at the Press of Villiers Publications.

“THE CITY / 1 AM – Unreasonable fear, of the shadows of Harry Lime, of the dead reappearing”

Contributors:
James Schuyler – “Shed Market”, “Joint”
Gerrit Lansing – “Explorers”
Barbara Guest – “Safe Flights”, [untitled] “Once when he was a small boy…”,  “Abruptly, as if a Forest Might Say”
Helen Adam – “Anaid si Taerg (Great is Diana)”
Madeline Gleason – “Wind Said, Marry”
Robert Duncan – “What do I Know of the Old Lore?”
Jack Spicer – “Central Park West”
Larry Eigner – “Poem”
Tom Field – [untitled] “Form is never more than the extension…”
Edward Marshall – “Times Square”, “2”, “3”
John Wieners – “The Imperatrice”
Philip Lamantia – “Opus Magnum”
Sheri Martinelli – “Ruth Gildenberg”
Michael Rumaker – “The River at Night”
Charles Olson – “The Year is a Great Circle…”, The Post Virginal”, [untitled] “Desartes, age 34…”
John Haines – “Poem”, “Pawnee Dust”

M

The Spicer Circle magazine M appeared in 1962 in the period after J and before Open Space. Edited by poets Lew Ellingham and Stan Persky, the magazine published John Allen Ryan, George Stanley, Heinrich von Kleist (translated by Jim Herndon), Robin Blaser, William McNeill, Jack Moore, Gail Chugg, Bob Conner, David Melville and the editors. Ellingham spent years researching a biography of Spicer, which was eventually co-authored with poet Kevin Killian as Poet Be Like God (Wesleyan, 1998).

M, No. 1, edited by Lew Ellingham and Stan Persky
mags_m01San Francisco: M, Spring 1962
Side-stapled illustrated wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 64 pages, mimeograph printed.

“Contributions may be sent to 4 Harwood Alley of c/o ‘M’ at Gino & Carlo’s Bar, 548 Green Street, San Francisco 11. There is a box in the bar to receive contributions, and the bartender will hold any too large to be placed in the box.”

Contributors:
George Stanley – [untitled] “Not speaking in human speech…”
Lewis Ellingham – “Essays on Six Subjects”
Gail Chugg – “The Avenging Angel”
anonymous – “The River Bed”
Stan Persky – “Orpheus Under the Golden Gate Bridge”
George Stanley – “The Death of Orpheus”
Gail Chugg – “A Romantical Poem for Leigh Hunt”
Stan Persky – “Lake”
Gail Chugg – “The Spell Binders”
George Stanley – “The Great Wall of Canada”
anonymous – “The Eagle & The Sperm Whale”
anonymous – “Alaska, The Beautiful”
anonymous – “Change”
Stan Persky – “Twenty Years After”
Bob Conner – “To an Archaic Apollo”
anonymous – “The Commendatory”
anonymous – “The Guardians”
anonymous – “The Stone Statue”
Gail Chugg – “A Poem of Granite for Lew”
Stan Persky – “The Western Buildings”
Robin Blaser – “The Faerie Queene”
George Stanley – “The Crazy Bartender”
John Allen Ryan – “Fresco IV”
Jack Moore – [untitled] “I try at times…”
Wm McNeill – “Unyielding Demands”
Wm McNeill – “Kyoto: A Dream on the Banks of Two Rivers”
Bill McNeil – “By Heian’s Gate”
John Allen Ryan – “Convict Creek”
John Allen Ryan – “Second Annie Poem”
Heinrich von Kleist, trans. Jim Herndon – “On The Marionette Theatre”
David Melville – “Dop Dop Dop”

M, No. 2, edited by Lew Ellingham
mags_m02San Francisco: M, 1962
Side-stapled illustrated wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 48 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover illustration by Paul Alexander.

“This is the second issue, published on a summer holiday.”

Contributors:
Bill Roberts – “The Dwarf’s Handshake”
Jim Alexander – [untitled] “Promytheus wd hav askd…”
Larry Fagin – [untitled] “Though we come back…”
Helen Adam – “Memory”
Jack Flynn – “Jed”
Ruben Dario, trans. John Allen Ryan – “Cleopompa and Heliodemus”
Stan Persky – “The Astronomer”
Larry Fagin – “For Bill”
Ebbe Borregaard – “October Seventh Poem”
Jim Alexander – “Melody of Triumverates”
Bill Roberts – “The Tower and the Cross”
John Allen Ryan – “The Gleaners”
Tony Sherrod – [untitled] “Beneath one thigh…”
Parker Hodges – “Irresistably, the Birds”
Lewis Ellingham – “Poem for S.”
Larry Fagin – [untitled] “No don’t dead hide my dying giving…”

The Rivoli Review

The Rivoli Review, Vol. Zero, No. One, edited by Richard Duerden 
mags_rivoli01San Francicso: The Rivoli Review 1963
Side-stapled illustrated wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 24 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover illustration by Jess Collins.

 

Contributors:
Ford Madox Ford – “Meary Walker”
Robert Duncan – “Weacing the Design”
James Koller – [untitled] “mottled brown birds…”
Richard Duerden – “Seven: #2 La Martine Place”
Denise Levertov – “Hypocrite Women”
Lynn Lonidier – “Chagall and Bella”
Ron Loewinsohn – “Art for Art’s Sake”, “The Rain, The Rain”
Gerald Gilbert – [untitled] “Sunshine…”
Lorenzo Thomas – “Grass”, “West”
Robert Peterson – “Critical Times”
Ron Loewinsohn – “Fuck You Roger Maris”
Philip Whalen – “Plums, Metaphysics, An Investigation, A Visit and a Short Funeral Ode”
Ron Loewinsohn – “It is to be Bathed in Light”

The Rivoli Review, Vol. Zero, No. Two, edited by Richard Duerden 
mags_rivoli02San Francicso: The Rivoli Review 1964
Side-stapled illustrated wrappers, 8.5″ x 14″, 30 pages, mimeograph printed.

 

Contributors:
James Koller – “The People are Coming”
Ron Loewinsohn – “A Place to Go”
Jess Collins – “Song of the Pied Parrot”
Lew Brown – “from Lionel”
Deneen Brown – “Azalea Poem”
George Stanley – “Argus”
Robert Duncan – “Passages III”, “Passages 3-4”
Richard Duerden – “Silence, and Katharsis”
Lew Brown – “The Broadjump”, “from Lionel”
Jack Anderson – “The Scale of It”
Richard Duerden – “The Sonata”
Jack Anderson – “Man in a Doorway”
Gerard Malanga – “Final Sonnet XC”

Circle Magazine

Circle Magazine was published from 1944 to 1948 by George Leite, initially with poet Bern Porter. Produced at Leite’s Berkeley, California bookstore, daliel’s, the 10 issues featured poetry, prose, criticism and art from many of those whose creative works and their successors would later come to be called the San Francisco Renaissance. In addition to the magazine, Circle Editions published contemporary authors such as Albert Cossery and Henry Miller (a personal friend of Leite’s).


Circle, No. 1, 1944
mags_circle01Contributors:
Henry Miller – Open Letter to Small Magazines
Philip Lamantia – Two Poems
Bern Porter – You’re No Dope: Let Me Save You
Jeanne McGahey – Street With People
Rosalie Moore – Poem In 2 Scenes
George Elliott – The Red Battery
George Leite – Toward A Technique Of Rule
Josephine Miles – Four Poems
Joseph Van Auker – Pirandello In Chains
Lawrence Hart – The Map Of The Country

Circle, No. 2, 1944
mags_circle02Contributors:
Henry Miller – To Anaïs Nin
Glen Coffield – Two Poems
William Everson – Two War Elegies
Robert Barlow – Four Poems
Bern Porter – Letter To Gabene
W. Edwin Ver Becke – Four Line Prints
C.F. MacIntyre – Rilke And The Lost God
Dean Jeffries – Three Poems
William Carlos Williams – To The Dean
George Leite – To Henry Miller
Philip Lamantia – Two Poems
Shaemus Keilty – Quinquin

Circle, No. 3, 1944
mags_circle03Contributors:
Harry Hershkowitz – The Bulbul Birds
Kenneth Patchen – Four Poems
W. Edwin Ver Becke – The Father
Yvan Goll – Histoire De Parmenia L’Havanaise
Thomas Parkinson – Morning Passage
George Elliott – Two Poems
Douglas MacAgy – Palimpsest
Pvt. Leonard Wolf – Two Poems
Hamilton Tyler – Mr. Eliot And Mr. Milton
Jackson Burke – Poem
Pvt. J.C. Crews – Poem
M. Wheelan Grote – First Impression Of College
Lt (jg) Hubert Creekmore – Two Poems
Marie Wells – Two Poems
Lawrence Hart – About Marie Wells
Robert Lottick – Poem
Wendel Anderson – Poem
Kenneth Rexroth – Les Lauriers Sont Coupés

Circle, No. 4, 1944
mags_circle04Contributors:
Anaïs Nin – The All-Seeing
Theodore Schroeder – Where Is Obscenity?
Arthur Ginzel – Four
Walter Fowlie – The Two Creators
George Leite – Low Darkened Shelter
Henry Miller – Varda: The Master Builder
Lee Ver Duft – Poems
Herbert Cahoon – Marley And The Gemini
Lt. Joseph Stanley Pennell – Two Poems
Bern Porter – All Over The Place
James Franklin Lewis – To John Wheelwright
Forrest Anderson – Sea Poems
Warren d’Azevedo – Deep Six For Danny
Lt. Robert L. Dark – Two poems
Kenneth Rexroth – Les Lauriers Sont Coupés

Circle, No. 5, 1945
mags_circle05Contributors:
Weldon Kees – The Purcells
E.E. Cummings – Five Poems
Dane Rudhyar – Neptune, Evocator Extraordinary
Jess Cloud – Three Portraits
Henri Hell – Max Jacob
Douglas MacAgy – Clay Spohn’s War Machines
Henry Miller – Preface For The Power Within Us
Aline Musyl – Four Little Poems
Albert Clements – Rain
Alfred Young Fisher – Voltas For Fugues
George Leite & Bern Porter – Photo-poems
Frederic Ramsey, Jr. – Artist’s Life
Nicholas Moore – A Poem & A Story
Marguerite Martin – First Pity
Paul Radin – Journey Of The Soul
Max Harris – Two Poems

Circle, No. 6, 1945
mags_circle06Contributors:
Lawrence Hart – Some Elements Of Active Poetry
Rosalie Moore – Letter To Camp Orford, Poem In Two Scenes
Robert Barlow – Framed Portent, Table Set For Sea Slime
Marie Wells – Death At Noon, Monody In One
Jeanne McGahey – Road To Chicago
Alfred Morang – Darling Sister And The Pound Of Liver
Haldeen Brady -Whirl
Henry Miller – Knud Merrild: A Holiday In Paint
Robert Barlow – Tepuzteca, Tepehua
James Laughlin – Poem In 38 Lines
Thomas Parkinson – John Works On A Figure Of Virginia, Carving It
Harry Roskolenko – Return, The Expert
Eugene Gramm – A Gallery Of Americans
Maude Phelps Hutchins – Soliloquy At Dinner
Alex Comfort – The Soldiers
William Pillin – My Reply As A Jew
Leonora Carrington – Flannel Night Shirt
Richard O. Moore – Villanelle 1, Villanelle 2
Kenneth Rexroth – Les Lauriers Sont Coupés

Circle, No. 7-8, 1946
mags_circle07Contributors:
Robert Duncan – The Years As Catches
Ian Hugo – Two Block Prints
Anaïs Nin – Hedja
Hamilton Tyler – Finnegan Epic
Bern Porter – Map Of Joyce’s Life
Lindley Williams Hubbell Jacques Vache
Kenneth Patchen – Sleepers Awake
Thomas Hughes Ingle – Tattooed Sailor
Kenneth O. Hanson – Falstaff And The Chinese Poet
Douglas MacAgy – Without Horizon
James McCray – Four Paintings
Yvan Goll – The Magic Circle
Brewster Ghiselin – Concert In Dorse
Charlotte Marletto – Oblique Epitome
A.M. Klein – In Memoriam
Thomas Parkinson – Letter To A Young Lady
Howard O’Hagan – The Colony
Edmund de Coligny – The Poem Of The Two Oscars
Robert Barlow – Angel Hernandez, Artist
George Leite & Bern Porter – Two Photo-poems
Edwin Ver Becke – A Line Drawing And A Story, The Tryst
Gil Orovitz – Flamenco
Shaun FitzSimon – Easter Bells
Roger Pryor Dodge – A Non-esthetic Basis For The Dance
Alex Austin – Civilization
Oscar Williams – The Lemmings
Paul Radin – Three Conversions
Osmond Beckwith – Fire Sale
Warren D’ Azevedo – Blue Peter
Darius Milhaud – French Music Between Two Wars
George Barrows – Creative Photography
W.S. Graham – Three Poems
Eithene Wilkins – Two Poems
Jack Jones – A Story, A Poem
Samuel Holmes – The Death Of An Innocent
James Steel Smith – Murder And Complacency
Georges Henein – There Are No Pointless Jests
Martin H. Mack – It All Depends On How You Want It
David Cornel DeJong – Three Poems
Henry Miller – Three Books Tangent To Circle

Circle, No. 9, 1946
mags_circle09Contributors:
Lawrence Durrell – Eight Aspects Of Melissa
Gerald Burke – Essay On Children
Richard O. Moore – A History Primer
Jim Fitzsimmons – Four Experimental Nudes
David Stuart – The Inflammable Angel Kezia
C.F. MacIntyre – The Ars Poetica Of Paul Valery
William Everson – The Release
A. Seixas – Ellwood Graham
George Leite – The Wing: The Mirror
Alexis Comfort – Taras And The Snowfield
Walker Winslow – NP Ward
Hilaire Hiler – Manifesto Of Psychromatic Design
Harold Norse – Three Poems
Robert Wosniak – The Man In The Cape
Robert Stock – Triumphal Arch
Ericka Braun – Oath Of The Tennis Court
Max Harris (poet) – Revolutionary Poem
Mary Fabilli – The Memorable Hosptial
Will Gibson – Poem For Three
Selwyn Schwartz – Four Poems
Ernst Kaiser – The Development From Surrealism
Richard Lyons (writer) – A Note To Kenneth Patchen
Byron Vazakas – Two Poems
Henry Miller – Rimbaud Opus (Part Two)
Harry Roskolenko – PR, The Portable Review

Circle, No. 10, 1948
mags_circle10Contributors:
John Whitney & James Whitney – Audio-Visual Music
Joseph Stanley Pennell – Logistics
Mary Fabilli – The Boss
Giuseppe Ungaretti – Eight Poems
Antony Borrow – The Great Refusal
Douglas MacAgy – A Margin Of Chaos
Charles Howard – The Bride
Harry Partch – Show-horses In The Concert Ring
Robert Barlow – The Malinche Of Acacingo
Alex Comfort – Two Enemies Of Society
D. Rentis – Forward
Attile Joseph – Two Poems
Clarisse Blazek – Poet In Hungary
George Elliott – Story
Luis J. Trinkaus – Eight Inches Of Snow
Kendrick Smithyman – Legends Of The Gunner And His Girl
Warren D’Azevedo – Shuttle
Robert Duncan – Toward An African Elegy
Jody Scott & George Leite- Admission of Fission


Further reading
Circle Magazine 
Jean Varda site