Tag Archives: Ed Sanders

Joel Oppenheimer: Contributions to Books and Anthologies

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Section B:
Contributions to Books and Anthologies

1. 14 POETS, 1 ARTIST, edited by Jonathan Williams
New York: Jonathan Williams, 1958
“Blue Funk” [collected in A4]  (Butterick B1)


2. JAN 1ST 1959: FIDEL CASTRO
New York, Totem Press, 1959
“For the Barbers” [collected in A4] (Butterick B2)

3. THE NEW AMERICAN POETRY, edited by Donald M. Allen
New York: Grove Press, 1960
“The Bath” [first appeared in A3], “The Bus Trip” [first appeared in A3], “The Feeding” [first appeared in A3], “Mare Nostrum” [first appeared in C19], “Blue Funk” [first appeared in B1], Autobiograhical statement (Butterick B3)

4. THE DARKNESS SURROUNDS US, by Gilbert Sorrentino
First edition:
Highlands: Jonathan Williams, October 1960
Saddle stapled in printed and photo-illustrated dust jacket, 6? x 9?, 48 pages, 1000 copies, printed by Heritage Printers in Charlotte. Introduction by Joel Oppenheimer. Collage and drawings by Fielding Dawson. (McPheron A1)

5. POEMS FOR MARLYN, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Fuck You Press, 1962
“Dear Miss Monroe” [collected in A9]. (Butterick B5)

6. A CONTROVERSY OF POETS, edited by Paris Leary and Robert Kelly
Garden City: Doubleday, 1965
Autobiographical statement (Butterick B6)

7. POEMS NOW, edited by Hettie Jones
New York: Kulchur Press, 1966
“Happy New Year” [collected in A11], “Sirventes on a Sad Occurence” [reprinted separately in A6 and collected in A9] (Butterick B7-B8)

8. ARTISTS AND WRITERS PROTEST AGAINST THE WAR IN VIETNAM: POEMS
New York: Artists & Writers Protest, 1967
“Viet Nam” (Butterick B9)

9. WHERE IS VIETNAM? AMERICAN POETS RESPOND, edited by Walter Lowenfels
Garden City: Doubleday, 1967
“The Present” (Butterick B10)

10. THE ZODIAC
New York: Brownstone Press, 1968
“in February the / waters run slow…” [collected in A9 as “Aquarius” (Butterick B11)

11. THE EAST SIDE SCENE: AN ANTHOLOGY OF A TIME AND A PLACE, edited by Allen De Loach
Buffalo: University Press, 1968
Autobiographical statement (Butterick B12)

12. AN ACTIVE ANTHOLOGY, edited by George Quasha
Fremont: Sumac Press, 1974
“Gettin’ There” (Butterick B13)

Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts

Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts ran for thirteen issues from 1962 to 1965. Considered one of the most influential underground magazines of the early sixties, Ed Sanders’ Fuck You was a deliberately fypprovocative mimeographed journal, at first emphasizing poetry and later expanding to include other writing. Each issue is illustrated with line drawings by Sanders.

Contributors include Sanders, Tuli Kupferberg, Carol Bergé, John Wieners, Andy Warhol, Ray Bremser, Lenore Kandel, Charles Olson, Joel Oppenheimer, Peter Orlovsky, Philip Whalen, Allen Ginsberg, Herbert Huncke, Julian Beck, Frank O’Hara, Leroi Jones, Diane DiPrima, William Burroughs, Gary Snyder, Robert Kelly, Judith Malina, Carl Solomon, Gregory Corso, Robert Duncan, Robert Creeley, Michael McClure, Ted Berrigan, Joe Brainard, Gilbert Sorrentino, and many others — a virtual “who’s who” of avant garde poetry in the Sixties.


1. Fuck You, No. 1, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: February 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

2. Fuck You, No. 2, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: April 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

3. Fuck You, No. 3, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: June 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

4. Fuck You, No. 4, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: August 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

5. Fuck You, No. 5, Vol. 1, edited by Ed Sanders
fy51New York: December 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

“Dedicated to pacificism, national defense thru nonviolent resistence, total assault on the culture, vaginal zapping, multilateral indiscriminate apertural conjugation, Hole Cons, Crotch Lake, Peace Eye, mad bands of stompers for peace, & all those gropped by J. Edgar Hoover in the silent halls of congress.”

6. Fuck You, No. 5, Vol. 2, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: December 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

7. Fuck You, Number 5, Volume 3, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: May 1963
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

“Dedicated to pacificism, National Defense thru Nonviolent Resistance, Anarchia the Goddess, Orlovsky’s long Egyptian finger, Peace Eye, Hole Cons, Peace Walk Dicking, dope thrill Banana rites, Acapulco Gold, Panamanian Red, Honduras Brown, windowbox freak grass, the anarcho-commio-greaser conspiracy, submarine boarders, mad bands of stompers for Peace, and all those groped by J. Edgar Hoover in the silent halls of Congress”.

8. Fuck You, Number 5, Volume 4, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Summer 1963
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

9. Fuck You, Number 5, Volume 5, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: December 1963
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

10. Fuck You, Number 5, Volume 6, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: April/May 1963
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

11. Fuck You, Number 5, Volume 7, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: September 1964
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

12. Fuck You, Volume 5, Number 8, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: March 1965
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover artwork by Andy Warhol.

13. Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts, Volume 5, Number 9

d.a. levy

Section A: Books and Other Separate Publications
Section B: Contributions to Books and Other Publications
Section C: Contributions to Periodicals
Section D: Publications Edited and Published
Section E: Periodicals and Series Edited and Published

Jim Lowell’s d.a. levy checklist

Falling Down Press and Kirpan Press


Further Reading and Reference:

THE BUDDHIST THIRD CLASS JUNKMAIL ORACLE: The Art and Poetry of d.a. levy, edited by Mike Golden. NY: Seven Stories Press, 1999.

D.A. LEVY & THE MIMEOGRAPH REVOLUTION, edited by Larry Smith and Ingrid Swanberg. Huron: Bottom Dog Press, 2007

LOOKING FOR D.A. LEVY (RANDOM SIGHTINGS): THE D.A. LEVY BIBLIOGRAPHY, Volume 1 [1963-1966], edited by Kent Taylor and Alan Horvath. Vancouver: Kirpan Press, 2006

LOOKING FOR D.A. LEVY (RANDOM SIGHTINGS): THE D.A. LEVY BIBLIOGRAPHY, Volume 2 [1967-1968], edited by Kent Taylor and Alan Horvath. Vancouver: Kirpan Press, 2008

ZEN CONCRETE & ETC. BY D.A. LEVY, edited by Ingrid Swanberg. Madison: Ghost Pony Press, 1991


Additional Resources:

Cleveland Memory Project

d.a. levy home page

Deep Cleveland

Literary Kicks


Some notes on printing methods:

Mimeograph:
The stencil duplicator or mimeograph machine is a low-cost duplicating machine that works by forcing black ink through a stencil onto levy_greattibetanpaper. The mimeograph process should not be confused with the spirit duplicator process.

Unlike spirit duplicators (where the only ink available is depleted from the master image), mimeograph technology works by forcing a replenishable supply of ink through the stencil master. In theory, the mimeography process could be continued indefinitely, especially if a durable stencil master were used (e.g. a thin metal foil). In practice, most low-cost mimeo stencils gradually wear out over the course of producing several hundred copies. Typically the stencil deteriorates gradually, producing a characteristic degraded image quality until the stencil tears, abruptly ending the print run. If further copies are desired at this point, another stencil must be made.

Spirit Duplicator:
A spirit duplicator (also referred to as a Ditto machine in North America, Banda machine in the UK or Roneo in Australia, France and South Africa) was a printing method invented in 1923. The term “spirit duplicator” refers to the alcohols which were a major component of the solvents used as “inks” in these machines.

The usual wax color was aniline purple (mauve), a cheap, moderately durable pigment that provided good contrast, but masters were also manufactured in red, green, blue, black, and the hard-to-find orange, yellow, and brown. All except black reproduced in pastel shades: pink, mint, sky blue, and so on.

Spirit duplicators had the useful ability to print multiple colors in a single pass, which made them popular with cartoonists. Multi-colored designs could be made by swapping out the waxed second sheets; for instance, shading in only the red portion of an illustration while the top sheet was positioned over a red-waxed second sheet. This was possible because the duplicating fluid was not ink, but a clear solvent.