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Locus Solus

“L’écriteau bref qui s’offre à l’oeil apitoyé”
– Roussel

The first generation of New York School poets took their first shot at editing their own magazine in Locus Solus, a title that marks a private space both in its meaning (solitary place) and its derivation. It alludes to a 1914 novel of the same title by Raymond Roussel, the obscure French author whose work provided a secret meeting ground for the New York School poets. The idea for the magazine originated with Harry Mathews and John Ashbery, both living in France at the time. Mathews was able to provide funding through a recent inheritance, but otherwise his interest in the magazine was principally devoted to seeing installments of his novel The Conversions published in the first three issues, though the final issue (No. 5, 1962) also contains his poem “The Ring” and his translation of a portion of Roussel’s Locus Solus. Ashbery provided editorial leadership by assembling a “Double Issue of New Poetry” (numbers 3-4, winter 1962) and recruiting James Schuyler and Kenneth Koch to edit other issues. Koch’s “Special Collaborations Issue” (No. 2, summer 1961) remains a significant reference point for the practice that has become a defining feature of New York School poetry. Schuyler’s issues, the first and last (No. 1, winter 1961; No. 5, 1962), are miscellaneous but nevertheless formed by a deliberate intention to represent a group identity as Schuyler conceived it. In soliciting a contribution from his longtime friend Chester Kallman (1921–75), whose work appeared in the final issue, Schuyler explained that “part of the unstated objective” of Locus Solus was to offer “a riposte at The New American Poetry [1960], which has so thoroughly misrepresented so many of us” (it did not represent Kallman at all).

As a correction or supplement to The New American Poetry, 1945-1960, the most important contributions of Locus Solus are the re-introduction of Edwin Denby (represented in the first issue by nine sonnets from Mediterranean Cities [1956]) and the forecasting of Ashbery’s “experimental” turn in poems later collected in The Tennis Court Oath (1962; “The New Realism,” Locus Solus, Nos. 3–4) and Rivers and Mountains (1966; “Into the Dusk-Charged Air,” Locus Solus, No. 5). The poets’ work in prose is also represented in Schuyler’s “Current Events” (Locus Solus, No. 1); an early installment of the collaborative novel by Schuyler and Ashbery, A Nest of Ninnies (Locus Solus, No. 2); and Denby’s memoir “The Thirties” (Locus Solus, No. 5). The representation of the first-generation New York School poets in Locus Solus is completed with work by Kenward Elmslie, Barbara Guest, Koch, and Frank O’hara. The second generation begins to emerge with names that were to become prominent (Bill Berkson, Ted Berrigan, Joseph Ceravolo, John Perreault) and some others who had connected with Koch and O’Hara through their workshops at the New School (Jean Boudin, Allan Kaplan, Ruth Krauss). Another workshop student, Michael Benedikt (1935-2007), though not usually associated with the New York School, made his closest connection in the context of Locus Solus, assuming the title of managing editor for the final issue.

Although handsomely printed on fine paper, Locus Solus was not illustrated. It included writing by various authors with ties to the visual arts that were so important to New York School poetry. Fairfield Porter (and his wife, Anne), Robert Dash (a painter friend of the Porters), Musa McKim (the wife of Philip Guston), Larry Rivers, and Harold Rosenberg all contributed poems. Rudolph Burckhardt published Love in Three Acts: A Swiss Play (Locus Solus, No. 1). Using the form of a play, Jane Freilicher and Koch assigned lines to various parts of “The Car” (Locus Solus, No. 2) in a demonstration of collaboration on several levels. In the final issue, poems by Gerard Malanga and Piero Heliczer (1937-1993) signal the Andy Warhol circle that would expand throughout the coming decade to take in many New York School poets.

–Diggory, Terence. “Locus Solus” Encyclopedia of the New York School Poets. 2009


1. LOCUS SOLUS, No. 1, edited by James Schuyler
Lans-en-Vercors: Locus Solus, Winter 1960-1961

First edition, sewn-signatures bound into printed wrappers, 5” x 7”, 168 pages. There were 100 special copies printed in a limited numbered issue. Printed by Imprenta Graficas Miramar, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

  • Contents:
    1. Kenneth Koch – “On the Go”
      Kenneth Koch – “The Circus”
      Kenneth Koch – “The Railway Stationery”
      Barbara Guest – “Afternoons I: The Location of Things”
      Barbara Guest – “Afternoons II: Windy Afternoon”
      Barbara Guest – “Afternoons III: Russians at the Beach”
      Barbara Guest – “Melisande”
      Barbara Guest – “River Side”
      Barbara Guest – “Palm Trees”
      Barbara Guest – “All Grey-Haired My Sisters”
      James Schuyler – “Current Events”
      Anne Porter – “The First of May”
      Ebbe Borregaard – “Other stories of the beauty wapiti”
      Ebbe Borregaard – “wapiti 3”
      Ebbe Borregaard – “from Sprach””
      John Ashbery – “Idaho”
      John Ashbery – “Spring Twilight”
      John Ashbery – “Thoughts of a Young Girl”
      John Ashbery – “The Passive Preacher”
      John Ashbery – “Winter”
      John Ashbery – “A White Paper”
      Harry Mathews – “The Conversions (I)”
      Frank O’Hara – “Poem” [“To be idiomatic in a vacuum…”]
      Frank O’Hara – “Overlooking the River”
      Frank O’Hara – “East River”
      Frank O’Hara – “Ducal Days”
      Frank O’Hara – “Locarno, to James Schuyler”
      Frank O’Hara – “The Opera”
      Frank O’Hara – “House”
      Frank O’Hara – “Failures of Spring”
      Frank O’Hara – “Adieu to Norman, Bonjour to Joan and Jean-Paul”
      Frank O’Hara – “Far from the Porte des Lilas and the Rue Pergolese, to Joan Mitchell”
      Edwin Denby – “from Mediterranean Cities: Trastevere A Dedication”
      Edwin Denby – “from Mediterranean Cities: Venice”
      Edwin Denby – “from Mediterranean Cities: Villa D’este”
      Edwin Denby – “from Mediterranean Cities: Olévano Romano”
      Edwin Denby – “from Mediterranean Cities: Sant’ Angelo D’ischia”
      Edwin Denby – “from Mediterranean Cities: Positano”
      Edwin Denby – “from Mediterranean Cities: Delos”
      Edwin Denby – “from Mediterranean Cities: Mykonos”
      Edwin Denby – “from Mediterranean Cities: Ciampino Envoi”
      Robin Blaser – “Cups”
      George Montgomery – “The Painters”
      George Montgomery – “The Poet”
      George Montgomery – “Rocks under me are hard”
      George Montgomery – “D.W.”
      Rudy Burckhardt – “Love in Three Acts: a Swiss Play”
      Fairfield Porter – “The Mountain”
      Fairfield Porter – “To Laurence”
      Fairfield Porter – “At the End of Summer”
      Fairfield Porter – “When the morning train…”

2. LOCUS SOLUS, No. 2, A SPECIAL ISSUE OF COLLABORATIONS, edited by Kenneth Koch
Lans-en-Vercors: Locus Solus, Summer 1961

First edition, sewn-signatures bound into printed wrappers, 5” x 7.25”, 208 pages. There were 50 special copies printed in a limited numbered issue. Printed by Atar S.A., Geneva.

  • Contents:
    1. John Ashbery – “To a Waterfowl”
      Five Chinese Poets – “A Garland of Roses” (translated by Donald Keene)
      Sei Shonagon and The Empress Sadako – “Poem about Saisho” (translated by Arthur Waley)
      Basho, Bonsho, Fumikuni and Kyorai – “The Kite’s Feathers” (translated by The Nippon Gkujutsu Shinkokai)
      Kakei, Basho – “November” (translated by Donald Keene)
      Basho, Ichiei, Sora and Sensui – “Gather Seawards” (translated by Donald Keene)
      Sogi, Shohaku and Socno – “Three Poets at Minase” (translated by Donald Keene)
      Blacatz and Vidal – “Tenso” (translated by Paul Blackburn)
      Vidal and Lanza – “Tenso” (translated by Paul Blackburn)
      Aragon, Salvatge, Foix and Auriac – “Coblas” (translated by Paul Blackburn)
      John Fletcher and William Shakespeare – “Song”
      John Donne and Henry Goodyere – “A Letter”
      Abraham Cowley and Richard Crashaw – “On Hope”
      John Suckling and Edmund Waller – “In Answer of Sir John Suckling’s Verses”
      Thomas Chatterton – “Onn Oure Ladies Chyrche”
      Thomas Chatterton – “The Account of W. Canynges Feast”
      Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey – “Two Passages from ‘Joan of Arc'”
      Marinetti, Cangiullo – “Public Garden: A Play” (translated by Kenneth Koch)
      André Breton and Paul Eluard – “from The Immaculate Conception” (translated by John Ashbery)
      Paul Eluard and Benjamin Peret – “Surrealist Proverbs” (translated by Kenneth Koch)
      André Breton and Yves Tanguy – “Question and Answer Game” (translated by Kenneth Koch)
      Paul Eluard and Others – “Cadavres Exquis” (translated by Kenneth Koch)
      René Char and Paul Eluard – “New” (translated by John Ashbery)
      René Char and Paul Eluard – “Landings” (translated by John Ashbery)
      James McAuley and Harold Stewart – “Boult to Marina”
      James McAuley and Harold Stewart – “Sybilline”
      John Ashbery and James Schuyler – “A Nest of Ninnies”
      Frank O’Hara – “Choses Passageres”
      Joseph Ceravolo and John Perreault – “Milk”
      Daniel Krakauer – “The Jack Who Yawned”
      Michael Benedikt and Milton Gilman – “Under the Stones, Where it is Shy”
      Jane Freilicher and Kenneth Koch – “The Car”
      Bill Berkson and Kenward Elmslie – “Armagnac or The Visitor”
      William Burroughs and Gregory Corso – “Everywhere March Your Head”
      William Burroughs and Gregory Corso – “Sons of Your In”
      Gregory Corso – “Cut Up”
      Ruth Krauss – “News”
      Ruth Krauss – [untitled] “compare thee…”
      John Ashbery and Kenneth Koch – “The Young Collectors”
      John Ashbery and Kenneth Koch – “Crone Rhapsody”
      John Ashbery and Kenneth Koch – “The Inferno”
      John Ashbery and Kenneth Koch – “Gottlieb’s Rainbow”
      John Ashbery and Kenneth Koch – “New Year’s Eve”
      John Ashbery and Kenneth Koch – “A Servant to Servants”
      Harry Mathews – “The Conversions (II)”
      Kenneth Koch – “A Note on this Issue”

3. LOCUS SOLUS, Nos. 3-4, NEW POETRY, edited by John Ashbery
Lans-en-Vercors: Locus Solus, Winter 1961-1962

First edition, sewn-signatures bound into printed wrappers, 5” x 7.25”, 296 pages. Printed by Atar S.A., Geneva.

  • Contents:
    1. Michael Benedikt – “Victoria Falls”
      Michael Benedikt – “The Estate”
      Michael Benedikt – “In the Park”
      Michael Benedikt – “Traditions of Farming”
      Leroi Jones – “A Long Poem for Myself”
      Leroi Jones – “Style”
      Leroi Jones – “The End of Man is His Beauty”
      Leroi Jones – “A Poem for Myself, the Fool”
      Daniel Krakauer – “Selestina”
      Daniel Krakauer – “Prince Valiant’s Childhood”
      Bill Berkson – “Four Great Songs”
      Bill Berkson – “Warnings”
      Bill Berkson – “A Hot Day”
      Bill Berkson – “Poem, to Joe Lesueur”
      Bill Berkson – “Breath”
      Bill Berkson – “All You Want”
      Bill Berkson – “Pollyanna”
      Welton Smith – “If I Could Hold You for Light”
      Welton Smith – “This Sojourn in the Middle of Summer”
      Larry Rivers – “The Song of Polish Night”
      Larry Rivers – “1953”
      Larry Rivers – “The Month”
      Larry Rivers – “An Ape is in the Bedroom”
      Larry Rivers – “Only God Can Make a Tree”
      Larry Rivers – “Benjamin F”
      Robin Blaser – “The Park”
      Diane Di Prima – “Moon Mattress”
      Dennis Quinn – “from Life Shapes, Clock and Vein”
      Dennis Quinn – “from Life Shapes, Candles”
      Dennis Quinn – “from Life Shapes, You”
      Dennis Quinn – “from Life Shapes, Wish”
      Dennis Quinn – “Question”
      Dennis Quinn – “Off Guam”
      Dennis Quinn – “High”
      Dennis Quinn – “In Tangier”
      Alan Ansen – “Moonling”
      Alan Ansen – “Prohibition”
      Alan Ansen – “On and On and On”
      Robert Lax – [untitled] “the port…”
      Robert Lax – [untitled] “shadows…”
      Robert Lax – [untitled] “mystery of water…”
      Robert Lax – [untitled] “to the center…”
      Jean Boudin – “Second Story Brownstone”
      Jean Boudin – “Of the Nile”
      Frank O’Hara – “How to Get There”
      Frank O’Hara – “Favorite Painting in the Metropolitan”
      Frank O’Hara – “Wind”
      Frank O’Hara and Bill Berkson – “from The Memorandums of Angelicus Fobb”
      Frank O’Hara and Bill Berkson – “FYI 6/26/61 (The Picnic Hour)”
      George Stanley – “The Death of Orpheus”
      George Stanley – “Moonlight”
      Paul Carroll – “Postcard for Joseph Cornell”
      Denis Roche – [untitled] “As a matter of fact…” (translate by John Ashbery)
      Marcelin Pleynet – “of coal” (translated by John Ashbery)
      Marcelin Pleynet – “the new republic” (translated by John Ashbery)
      Marcelin Pleynet – “Black” (translated by John Ashbery)
      Pierre Martory – “Evenings in Rochefort” (translated by John Ashbery)
      Pierre Martory – “Tchat”
      Joseph Ceravolo – “A Great Sadness”
      Joseph Ceravolo – “The Climb”
      Joseph Ceravolo – “The Forest”
      Joseph Ceravolo – “Different Fragments of 2 Different Negro Poems”
      Joseph Ceravolo – “Water: How Weather Feels the Cotton Hotels”
      Musa McKim – “The News from Here”
      Musa McKim – “A Theory”
      Musa McKim – “The Train”
      Allan Kaplan – “Memory in France”
      Allan Kaplan – “Soliloquy of a Boat”
      Allan Kaplan – “Traffic Signals…”
      Hugh Amory – “from The Federalists”
      Daisy Aldan – “Zina”
      Kenward Elmslie – “Shirley Temple Surrounded by Lions”
      Kenward Elmslie – “Solar Rebus”
      Kenward Elmslie – “Ghandi”
      Kenward Elmslie – “Experts at Veneers”
      James Schuyler – “December”
      Gerard Malanga – “Psyche”
      James Koller – [untitled] “crouched in mothers musk…”
      James Merrill – “Letter from Egypt”
      David Ball – “A Recent Conversation”
      John Ashbery – “The New Realism”
      Furman Stout – “Prose Poem for Clara”
      Landis Everson – “from The Little Ghosts I Played With”
      John Perreault – “Circles”
      John Perreault – “O Whatta Beautiful Polish City So Shiny Aluminum”
      John Perreault – “Paris”
      Barbara Guest – “Dardanella”
      Barbara Guest – “His Jungle”
      Barbara Guest and Sa’Di Koylan – “Turkish”
      Anselm Hollo – “Text 9.iii. 1961”
      Kenneth Koch – “Ma Provence”
      Kenneth Koch – “Rialto”
      Kenneth Koch – “The Steam Bath”
      Kenneth Koch – “The Coat License”
      Kenneth Koch – “How Fair”
      Kenneth Koch – “Bon Dieu”
      Kenneth Koch – “The Echo”
      Jack Foss – “The Categorical Avoidance”
      Robert Magowan – “Summer of 1958”
      Robert Magowan – “Myra”
      Thomas Jackrell – “Grandma”
      Thomas Jackrell – “A Plan”
      Thomas Jackrell – “Art Finally Safe”
      Thomas Jackrell – “The River”
      Thomas Jackrell – “from Green Book: Cactuscope”
      Thomas Jackrell – “from Green Book”
      Thomas Jackrell – “The South Central States of America”
      Harry Mathews – “The Conversions (III)”

5. LOCUS SOLUS, No. 5, edited by James Schuyler
Lans-en-Vercors: Locus Solus, 1962

First edition, sewn-signatures bound into printed wrappers, 5” x 7.25”, 184 pages. Printed by Atar S.A., Geneva.

  • Contents:
    1. Gerard Malanga – “Ode to Turchetti”
      Gerard Malanga – “The Girl Stands Under the Mobile at the Museum”
      Gerard Malanga – “Amour, Amour, Amour”
      Harold Rosenberg – “Ballad of Moral Beauty”
      Chester Kallman – “Wanderer”
      Chester Kallman – “Weighty Questions”
      Edwin Denby – “The Thirties”
      Frank O’Hara – “Mary Desti’s Ass”
      Frank O’Hara – “Madrid”
      Frank O’Hara – “Poem” (“Twin spheres full of fur and noise…”
      Frank O’Hara – “Blue Territory, to Helen Frankenthaler”
      Frank O’Hara – “Lebanon”
      Ted Berrigan – “Poem in the Traditional Manner”
      Carl Morse – “First Snow: Yorkville and Elsewhere”
      Carl Morse – “The Crisis: Tompkins Park and After”
      Carl Morse – “Anchor Demolition: East 82nd Street”
      Musa Guston – “On Your Birthday”
      Musa Guston – “Brooklyns”
      Piero Heliczer – “The Beautiful Ambush”
      Piero Heliczer – “The Diving Bell”
      Anselm Hollo – “A Letter, Both Intimate and Didactic”
      Thomas Anhava – “Elegy for Night” (translated by Anselm Hollo)
      Frank Lissauer – “Repercussion”
      Frank Lissauer – “Towards Silence”
      Frank Lissauer – “A Proposition”
      John Ashbery – “Into the Dusk-Charged Air”
      Harold Rosenberg – “Liberalism and Conservatism–and Literature”
      Kenward Elmslie – “Cave in”
      Kenward Elmslie – “Marbled Chuckle in the Savannahs”
      Kenward Elmslie – “Circus Nerves and Worries”
      Barbara Guest – “Candies”
      Donna Kerness – “Insomnia VI”
      John Wieners – “The Acts of Youth”
      John Wieners – “The Mermaid’s Song”
      John Wieners – “An Anniversary of Death”
      Richard Elliott – “9 Elaborations for 26 Characters”
      Harry Mathews – “The Ring”
      Jean Boudin – “Politics”
      Robert Harson – “Lacrimae”
      John N. Morris – “Reno”
      Daisy Aldan – “Facility phrases”
      Edwin Denby – “Snoring in New York: an elegy”
      Raymond Roussel – “Locus Solus (I)” (translated by Harry Mathews)
      Michael Cain – “Lovepoetry”
      Robert Dash – “Mémoires d’autres”
      Kenneth Koch – “The Islands”
      Kenneth Koch – “The Departure from Hydra”
      Tony Whedon – “Sounds”
      Charles Edward Eaton – “Chimera”
      Charles Edward Eaton – “Unlikely Legend”
      David Beckwith – “Point”
      David Beckwith – “Abendslied”
      Michael Benedikt – “Sunlight on the Terrace”
      Michael Benedikt – “With Love”
      Michael Benedikt – “Island Life”
      James Schuyler – “April and its Forsythia”
      James Schuyler – “Grand Duo”
      James Schuyler – “Looking Forward to See Jane Real Soon”
      Mary Caroline Richards – “Holy Poems: Prayers”

Online Resources:

· Reality Studio – Locus Solus
· Georgia Tech: Curating the New York School – Locus Solus

Ted Berrigan

Andy Warhol Screen Test of Ted Berrigan, at the Factory on March 3, 1965.

Ted Berrigan was born in Providence, Rhode Island on November 15, 1934. He attended Providence College for a year before joining the U.S. Army in 1954 at the age of nineteen. After serving in the Korean War, he received a BA in English from the University of Tulsa in 1959 and an MA in 1962.


Ted Berrigan Checklist:

Section A: Books, Pamphlets, and Broadsides
Section B: Collaborations
Section C: Contributions to Periodicals
Section D: C Press
Section E: C: A Journal of Poetry


Berrigan moved to New York in the early 1960s, where he edited and published C: A Journal of Poetry and ran C Press, wrote art criticism, and collaborated with writers and artists such as Ron Padgett, Joe Brainard, and Anselm Hollo. Berrigan was a central figure in the second generation of the New York School of poets, which included Hollo, Padgett, Anne Waldman, Jim Carroll, and many others. He was the author of more than twenty books, including The Sonnets (C Press, 1964), Bean Spasms with Padgett and Brainard (Kulchur Press, 1967), Red Wagon (Yellow Press, 1976), and A Certain Slant of Sunlight (O Books, 1988).

Berrigan taught at the St. Mark’s Poetry Project in New York and was writer-in-residence / visiting poet at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. He has also taught at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Yale University, the State University of New York at Buffalo, University of Essex in England, Northeastern Illinois University, and the Naropa Institute. In 1979, he received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Ted Berrigan died on July 4, 1983.

 

Ron Padgett – Books, Pamphlets, and Broadsides

>> return to RON PADGETT main page >>

SECTION A:
This index includes books, pamphlets, and broadsides


1. Padgett, Ron. EPILOGUE
First edition:
New Haven: Penny Poems, 1959
Broadside, 7″ x 10″. Published as No. 88 in the Penny Poetry broadside series edited by Marvin Bell.

Note: first edition of Padgett’s first separate publication.

2. Padgett, Ron. SUMMER BALLOONS
First edition:
Tulsa: privately printed, 1960
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers, 4.25″ x 6″, 4 pages, 100 copies, printed by a local printer in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Note: first edition of Padgett’s first book.

According to Ron Padgett, as noted in James Jaffe’s Tulsa School catalog Many Happy Returns: “Summer Balloons was intended as a gift for a girl I had a big crush on, in the spring of 1960, our final semester of high school. I took the text to a local job printer, a man named Casebeer, who had an offset press in his garage. I gave him the specs and asked him to print a small number, perhaps 5 or 10 copies. He told me that it would cost virtually the same to print, say, 100. So I did. I gave the girl some copies, plus a few to friends (Ted, Joe, and Dick) and to a few penpal poets. I don’t know what happened to the rest. Ted went around destroying his first pamphlet [A Lily for My Love] because he was deeply embarrassed by its mawkish sentimentality. I never destroyed Summer Balloons, but whenever I glance at it I have to forgive myself for having printed it. I was just a kid.”

3. Padgett Ron. FOR PATRICIA, and David Meltzer. FROM TWO POEMS TO DO MEDITATION ON
First edition:
New Haven: Penny Poems, 1961
Broadside, 7″ x 10″. Published as No. 143 in the Penny Poetry broadside series edited by Marvin Bell.


4. Padgett, Ron. QUELQUES POÈMES / SOME TRANSLATIONS / SOME BOMBS
First edition:
New York: privately printed, 1963
Illustrated portfolio with 24 loose sheets, 8.5” x 11”, 100 numbered copies. Cover and three full-page illustrations by Joe Brainard.

According to a Granary Books catalog entry for this item: Padgett self-published this work in mimeographed loose sheets to allow the reader to rearrange the poems and pictures at will. Three full-page illustrations, as well as the cover, were created by Joe Brainard and printed on cardstock as part of the portfolio presentation of the work. The text is presented in three 6-part sections, each preceded by a Brainard “collage drawing” and a title page. The first section includes the poems by Reverdy in French, the second, Padgett’s translations, and the third, his “mis-translations”.

5. Padgett, Ron. IN ADVANCE OF THE BROKEN ARM
a. First edition:
New York: Lorenz Gude, 1964
Side-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 8.5” x 11”, 42 pages, 200 numbered and signed copies (also 10 copies with a silver gelatin print of Ron Padgett by Lorenz Gude tipped in), mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Joe Brainard.

b. Second edition:
New York: C Press, 1965
Side-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 8.5” x 11”, 200 numbered copies, mimeograph printed. Edited by Ted Berrigan. Cover art and illustrations by Joe Brainard (all differ from the first edition).

6. Padgett, Ron. TWO STORIES FOR ANDY WARHOL
First edition:
New York: C Press, 1965
Side-stapled with illustrated cover, 8.5” x 14”, 11 pages, mimeograph printed. Thermo-Fax cover by Andy Warhol.

The found text was excerpted from an early twentieth-century novel and is repeated on each page of the mimeographed book, reflecting the poet’s interest in appropriation and repetition.

7. Padgett, Ron. ROBERT’S BALL
First edition:
n.p.: privately printed, 1966
Accordion-fold with printed cover, 8.5″ x 4.5″, 6 copies. Hand-lettered and colored by Padgett.

8. Padgett, Ron. SKY
First edition:
London: Goliard Press, June 1966
Folded broadside, 325 copies of which 25 are numbered and signed.



9. Padgett, Ron. TONE ARM
First edition:
Wivenhoe Park: A Once Book, 1967
Side-stapled in illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 3 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art by Tom Veitch.


10. Padgett Ron. GREAT BALLS OF FIRE
a. First edition:
New York: Holt Rinehart & Winston, 1969
Cover art by Joe Brainard.

b. Second edition, revised
Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 1990

11. Padgett, Ron. STRANGE FAECES, No. 3: Ron Padgett Issue
First edition:
London: Strange Faeces Press, 1971

12. Padgett, Ron. SWEET PEA
First edition:
London: Aloes Books, 1971
200 copies. Cover art and illustrations by George Schneeman.

13. Padgett, Ron. CRAZY COMPOSITIONS
First edition:
Bolinas: Big Sky, 1974
750 copies.

14. Padgett, Ron. TOUJOURS L’AMOUR
First edition:
New York: Sun, 1976

15. Padgett, Ron. POEM [“The Baby Jesus…”]
First edition:
Bolinas: Yanagi, 1977

16. Padgett, Ron. TRIANGLES IN THE AFTERNOON
First edition:
New York: Sun, 1979

17. Padgett, Ron. TULSA KID
First edition:
Calais: Z Press, 1979

18. Padgett, Ron. TRIANGLES IN THE AFTERNOON
First edition:
New York: Sun, 1980

19. Padgett, Ron. THE BIG SOMETHING
First edition:
Great Barrington: The Figures, 1989

20. Padgett, Ron. BLOOD WORK: SELECTED PROSE
First edition:
Flint: Bamberger Books, 1993

21. Padgett, Ron. NEW & SELECTED POEMS
First edition:
Boston: David R. Godine, 1995

22. Padgett, Ron. POEMS I GUESS I WROTE
First edition:
New York: Cuz Editions, 2001

23. Padgett, Ron. YOU NEVER KNOW
First edition:
Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2001

24. Padgett, Ron. HOW TO BE PERFECT
First edition:
Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2007

25. Padgett, Ron. HOW LONG
First edition:
Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2011

26. Padgett, Ron. COLLECTED POEMS
First edition:
Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2013

27. Padgett, Ron. ALONE AND NOT ALONE
First edition:
Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2015

28. Padgett, Ron. BIG CABIN
First edition:
Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2019

29. Padgett, Ron. DOT
First edition:
Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2022

C Press

Begun in May 1963 by Ted Berrigan, with Lorenz Gude as publisher, the C Press and it’s mimeograph-printed magazine, provided an important early outlet for the writings of younger poets and their immediate predecessors.

1. Veitch, Tom. LITERARY DAYS
New York: Lorenz and Ellen Gude, 1964
First edition, side-stapled in illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 200 numbered and signed copies, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustration by Joe Brainard. Edited by Ron Padgett and Ted Berrigan.

According to Granary Books catalog, Poets’ First Books, A Short List: This is Tom Veitch’s first book and is also the first book published by C Press.

2. Berrigan, Ted. THE SONNETS
New York: C Press, 1964
First edition, first printing, 8.5″ x 11″, 300 copies, mimeograph printed. Cover art by Joe Brainard. Edited by Ron Padgett who also typed the stencils. Published by Lorenz and Ellen Gude at C Press. Berrigan has dedicated the book to Joe Brainard.

According to Granary Books catalog, Poets’ First Books, A Short List: Considered one of Berrigan’s most influential works, this book is widely considered his first, in the first edition. However, its publication is technically preceded by A Lily for My Love, which Berrigan attempted to round up copies and destroy (and this thus incredibly scarce).

3. Padgett, Ron. IN ADVANCE OF THE BROKEN ARM
New York: C Press, 1965
Second edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 8.5” x 11”, 200 numbered copies, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Joe Brainard (all differ from the first edition published by Lorenz Gude in 1964).

4. Burroughs, William. TIME
a. First edition:
New York: C Press, 1965
Saddle-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 32 pages, 1000 copies (886 in a trade edition; 100 numbered and signed; 10 lettered A-J, hardbound, with original manuscript page by Burroughs and original drawing by Gysin, signed; and four hardcover numbered copies hors commerce). Cover art by Burroughs. Illustrated by Brion Gysin. Edited by Ted Berrigan, Ron Padgett, and Joe Brainard.

According to a Granary Books catalog entry for this item: Ron Padgett, editor for the edition, relates, “Burroughs’ original manuscript was so faintly typed that the printer (a very helpful gentleman named Mr. Dymm at Fleetwood Letter Service) said it would not be legible in an offset edition.” In order to solve the problem, the editor created a facsimile of Burroughs’ manuscript. He rented a typewriter (with the same font as Burroughs’) and then acquired “a fresh (used) copy of the issue of Time (‘Transatlantic Edition,’ it called itself) he had used as the basis for his manuscript.”

“It was a lot of work, and I became rather obsessed with creating a perfect replica, but I enjoyed doing it. Burroughs was pleased with the result, but, given his characteristic reserve, he didn’t gush. Throughout the project he was cordial, polite, somewhat old-fashioned in his formal good manners. Brion Gysin was equally polite but a bit warmer in his demeanor.”

5. Padgett, Ron. TWO STORIES FOR ANDY WARHOL
New York: C Press, 1965
Second edition, side-stapled with illustrated cover, 8.5” x 14”, 11 pages, mimeograph printed. Thermo-Fax cover by Andy Warhol. The found text was excerpted from an early twentieth-century novel and is repeated on each page of the mimeographed book, reflecting the poet’s interest in appropriation and repetition.

6. Ceravolo, Joseph FITS OF DAWN
New York: C Press, 1965
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph printed. Cover art by Rosemary Ceravolo. Edited by Ted Berrigan. The poet’s first book.

7. Gallup, Dick. HINGES
New York: C Press, 1965
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph printed. Cover illustration by Joe Brainard. Edited by Ted Berrigan. The author’s first book published while Gallup was still a student at Columbia.

According to Granary Books catalog, Poets’ First Books, A Short List: “Gallup moved to New York City in 1961 to join high school classmates from Tulsa, Ron Padgett and Joe Brainard. Also from Tulsa was Ted Berrigan, whose C Press published Gallup’s first book of poetry. Gallup had been writing since high school, often collaborating with Padgett or Berrigan on small handmade “bokes” or ephemeral publications.

8. Brownstein, Michael. BEHIND THE WHEEL
New York: C Press, 1967
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 200 copies, mimeograph printed. Edited by Ted Berrigan. Published as issue No. 14 of C magazine.

9. Elmslie, Kenward. POWER PLANT POEMS
New York: C Press, 1967
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Joe Brainard. Edited by Ted Berrigan.

10. Notley, Alice. 165 MEETING HOUSE LANE / TWENTY-FOUR SONNETS
New York: C Press Publications, 1971
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 250 copies, mimeograph printed. Edited by Ted Berrigan.

11. Carey, Steve. THE LILY OF ST. MARK’S
New York: C Press, 1978
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 250 copies, mimeograph printed. Cover art by George Schneeman. Edited by Ted Berrigan.

12. Schneeman, Elio. IN FEBRUARY I THINK
New York: C Press, 1978
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 250 copies, mimeograph printed. Cover art by George Schneeman.


Online Resources:

· From a Secret Location – C Press

· Reality Studio – C Press Archive

Ron Padgett

Photo of Ron Padgett by Lorenz Gude circa 1964

Poet, editor, and translator Ron Padgett was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma. As a high-school student he founded the avant-garde literary journal The White Dove Review with his friends and fellow students Joe Brainard and Dick Gallup. Soliciting and publishing work from poets such as Allen Ginsberg and Robert Creeley, the magazine ran for five issues. Padgett moved to New York City in 1960 to attend Columbia College. Awarded a Fulbright in 1965, Padgett spent a year in Paris, France studying and translating French poetry. He eventually made his home in New York City’s East Village and became a vital part of the second generation New York School Poets, a group that included Brainard, Ted Berrigan, Alice Notley, Bill Berkson, and others.


Ron Padgett Checklist:

Section A: Books, Pamphlets, and Broadsides
Section B: Collaborations
Section C: Contributions to Periodicals
Section D: Books and Periodicals Edited
Section E: Memoirs
Section F: Translations


In 2018, Padgett received the Frost Medal from the Poetry Society of America, presented for distinguished lifetime achievement in poetry. He is the author of over 20 collections of poetry, including Big Cabin (2019); Collected Poems (2013), winner of the L.A. Times Book Prize; How Long (2011), a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; How to Be Perfect (2007); You Never Know (2001); and Great Balls of Fire (1969, reissued 1990). He has collaborated with the poet Ted Berrigan and the artists Jim Dine and George Schneeman. Of Padgett’s work, poet David Lehman wrote in Poetry, “The great legacy of French Surrealist and Dadaist writing makes itself felt in his poems.” Voice Literary Supplement contributor Karen Volkman called Padgett’s 1995 New and Selected Poems “a fine sampling of a restless, hilarious, and haunting lyric intelligence, a ‘phony’ whose variable voices form a rare and raucous orchestration: the real thing.”

In addition to poetry, Padgett has published numerous collections of prose: The Straight Line: Writing on Poetry and Poets (2000), Ted: A Personal Memoir of Ted Berrigan (1993), and Blood Work: Selected Prose (1993). He has also translated work from the French by writers Blaise Cendrars and Guillaume Apollinaire. He received the Harold Morton Landon Translation Award for Zone: Selected Poems by Guillaume Apollinaire (2015).

Padgett has been a teacher and director of the Poetry Project at St. Mark’s Church. He worked as publications director at the Teachers & Writers Collaborative for 20 years. From 2008 to 2013, he served as a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. He lives in New York City.


Online Resources:

· Ron Padgett – official website
· Ron Padgett PapersBeinecke Library

Piero Heliczer – Ephemera

>> return to PIERO HELICZER main page >>

SECTION F:
This index includes flyers and announcements for readings and film screenings


1. DEAD LANGUAGE / LE SOLEIL DANS LA TETE
Paris: Dead Language, c. 1959
Flyer, 6.25″ x 11″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer

Note: An announcement for a reading at the Left Bank bookshop-gallery, Le Soleil Dans La Tête. The text reads: “burroughs heliczer horovitz maclise norse & om in dead languages last poem session two xiii. & viv. august ix. pm soleil dans la tete 10 rue vaugirard”.

2. PIERO HELICZER WILL READ HIS POEMS
London: Gallery Bookshop, 1961
Flyer, 5″ x 7.75″, offset printed

Note: announces a poetry reading by Piero Heliczer at the Gallery Bookshop, Soho, London on December 9, 1961. Illustrated with the same photograph by Ph. Mechanicus that appears in Outburst, No. 2 and on the cover of & I Dreamt I Shot Arrows In My Amazon Bra.

3. THE DEAD LANGUAGE PRESENTS WM BURROUGHS reading from THE NAKED LUNCH (recorded in paris 1959) & PIERO HELICZER reading his latest book of poems THE FIRST BATTLE OF THE MARNE
New York: Dead Language, 1962
Handbill, 7″ x 14″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer

Note: announces a reading on December 16, 1962 at B Flat, 201 Avenue B, New York, “admission one dollar”. Illustrated with the photograph from the front cover of Heliczer’s poetry collection, The First Battle of the Marne, with the same art nouveau decorative border.

4. THE DEAD LANGUAGE PRESENTS A BENEFIT FOR FLAMING CREATURES / THE FILMS OF SMITH
New York: The Dead Language, 1963
Flyer, 7.5″ x 7″, offset printed

Note: announces screening of Jack Smith’s Flaming Creatures on March 9, 1963 at painter Jerry Jofen’s cavernous West 20th Street loft, which, among other things, had a reputation as a shooting gallery. Jofen was known for collaborating with Jack Smith, Jonas Mekas, Ken Jacobs, and Angus Maclise. This screening was a benefit for Flaming Creatures, which was in its final stages of editing and would premiere to the public a month later.

5. FIRST RUSHES OF PIERO HELICZERS NEW FILM
New York: Astor Play House, 1965
Flyer, 4.75″ x 5.5″

Note: announces a screening of a new (unnamed) film by Piero Heliczer at the Astor Play House in New York on Friday, July 30, 1965.

6. NEW YORK UNDERGROUND: 8-HOUR SPECTACLE – APPEARANCE OF THE STARS
New York: Broadway Central Hotel, 1965
Flyer, photocopy printed

Note: announces ‘New York Underground: 8-Hour spectacle, appearance of the stars’ in New York on August 11, 1965. Calligraphy by Angus Maclise. This marks one of the earliest performances of the Velvet Underground, appearing as the Falling Spikes. This event also marks a joint appearance of Piero Heliczer and Jack Smith as MC’s, who were both arrested at the event for outstanding warrants.

7. PIERO HELICZER – THE LAST RITES
New York: Filmmakers Cinematheque, 1965
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces a performance of Heliczer’s multimedia play The Last Rites at the Filmmaker Cinematheque on November 10, 1965 in New York.

8. PIERO HELICZERS CHRISTMAS SHOW
New York: U-P Film, 1966
Flyer, 11″ x 8.5″, photocopy printed

Note: announces screening of Heliczer’s Dirt Trilogy (Dirt, Satisfaction, Venus in Furs) presented by the Paris Filmakers Cooperative at the U-P Film in New York on December 15-16, 1966.

9. PIERO HELICZERS NEW YEAR SHOW
New York: U-P Film, 1968
Flyer, 11″ x 8.5″, photocopy printed

Note: announces screening of Heliczer’s Joan of Arc with music by Tony Conrad and starring Andy Warhol, Ted Berrigan and “many others” presented by the Paris Filmakers Cooperative at the U-P Film in New York on January 19-20, 1968.

10. MEDALS OF THE UNDERGROUND
New York: U-P Screen, 1968
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces screening of Heliczer’s The Stone Age resented by the Paris Filmmakers Cooperative at U-P Screen on February 23-24, 1968.

11. UNDERGROUND FILMS
Paris: The American Centre, 1968
Flyer, 8.5″, x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces screening of Heliczer’s The Stone Age Part Two, and USA v Piero Heliczer, plus other films by Gerard Malanga, Storm de Hirsch, Andy Warhol, Jonas Mekas and others at The American Centre in March 1968.

12. PIERO HELICZERS CHRISTMAS SHOW
Paris: The American Center for Students and Artists, 1968
Flyer, 11″ x 8.5″, photocopy printed

Note: announces screening of Heliczer’s Dirt and Joan of Arc, parts one and two at The American Center for Students and Artists on November 29–December 1, 1968.

13. RETURN OF THE LIGHT, PIERO HELICZERS NEW YEAR SHOW
Paris: The American Center for Students and Artists, 1969
Flyer, 9.5″ x 14″, offset printed

Note: announces a screening of three films by Piero Heliczer, presented by the Paris Filmmakers Coop, “avec wm burroughs andy warhol jeff keen betaudier & the children of albion” at 9pm, January 24-26 (1969) at The American Center for Students and Artists located at 261 Blvd. Raspail (Paris).

15. PIERO HELICZER – AQUARIUM & HEART
London: ICA, 1969
Flyer, 8″ x 13″, offset printed

Note: announces a screening of films by Piero Heliczer at the ICA in London on March 15, 1969. Prints a 16-line text by Tom Raworth and a list of titles of other work by Heliczer, including Autumn Feast (1961), Satisfaction (1965) and Rushes from the Stone Age (the latter featuring Tom Raworth, Jack Smith, Gerard Malanga et al).

According to BeatBooks catalog #86, The title of Heliczer’s film, Aquarium, had previously appeared in the name of Aquarium Productions, set up by Heliczer and Angus MacLise sometime around April 1965 for a multimedia stage presentation they were organizing at the Film-Makers’ Cinematheque in New York. Called Launching The Dream Weapon, it featured an early incarnation of the Velvet Underground and preceded Andy Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable shows by almost a year.

16. POETRY & FILMS
New York: Ikon & Millenium, 1969
Flyer, 11″ x 8.5″, offset printed. Illustrated with a montage by Jud Yalkut featuring two central images of Piero Heliczer, one of them showing him with his 8mm  camera.

Note: announces a poetry reading at Ikon at 78 East 5th Street in New York on October 11, 1969 and films at Millenium at 46 Great Jones Street in New York on October 12, 1969.

17. PIERO HELICZERS CHRISTMASS HOW
New York: Elgin Cinema, 1969
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, offset printed. Illustrated with a montage by Piero Heliczer.

According to BeatBooks catalog #86,  announces screenings of five films by Piero Heliczer at the Elgin Cinema in New York City on December 21, 1969. The films shown included Venus in Furs (named after the Velvet Underground song and featuring Lou Reed, John Cale, Angus MacLise and Barbara Rubin), and Satisfaction (also featuring Cale, MacLise and Rubin, along with Gerard Malanga, Irene Nolan, Mario Montez, and Jack Smith).

18. PIERO HELICZER NEWY EARS HOW
New York: Bleecker Street Cinema, 1970
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, offset printed

According to BeatBooks catalog #86, announces a benefit for the Paris Filmmakers Coop featuring screenings of films by Piero Heliczer, Andy Warhol, Tony Conrad and Ira Cohen at the Bleecker Street Cinema in New York at midnight on January 31, 1970. Lists the world premiere of Heliczer’s film, ‘Stone Age’, along with Andy Warhol’s ‘Couch’ (in which Heliczer appeared with Gerard Malanga); ‘The Flicker’ by Tony Conrad; and Ira Cohen’s ‘The Invasion of Thunderbolt Pagoda’, though the film title is not stated on the flyer. The multi-media event also featured a performance by Angus MacLise, readings by Gerard Malanga and William Burroughs (possibly from his recently completed novel, ‘The Wild Boys’), a light show, theatre, and ‘inflatable environments’.

19. BLEECKER STREET CINEMA
New York: Bleecker Street Cinema, February 1970
Flyer, 11″ x 8.5″, offset printed

Note: announces a benefit for the Paris Filmmakers’ Coop at the Bleecker Street Cinema in New York, featuring a midnight screening of films by Piero Heliczer, Andy Warhol, Stan Brakhage, Ron Rice, Jud Yalkut, Yayoi Kusama (presumably ‘Kusama’s Self-Obliteration’), and Jack Smith. Designed by Piero Heliczer.

20. ITALIAN TOUR
Paris: Paris Filmmakers Coop, (c. 1970)
Fyler, 9.5″ x 12.75, offset printed. Illustration by Hundertwasser.

Note: announces ‘Italian Tour – piero heliczer 29 30 31 Mai andy warhol larry rivers irene nolan pattilee chenis claudio monteverde the rolling stones pluto venus 261 Bd Raspail à 21 h’.

21. PIERO HELICZERS APRIL FOOLS SHOW
flyer_aprilfool
Boston: Kenmore Square Cinema, 1970
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces screenings of Heliczer films at the Kenmore Square Cinema at 644 Beacon in Boston on Friday and Saturday, April 3-4, 1970.

22. PIERO HELICZERS EASTER SHOW
flyer_aquarium
New York: Bleeker Street Cinema, 1970
Fyler, 8.5″ x 11″, offset printed

Note: announces Aquarium Productions and Museum of the Future gala benefit for Paris Filmmaker Cooperative held at Bleeker Street Cinema in New York on April 10, 1970. The event included screenings of Stan Brakhage’s film Moth Light, Heliczer’s films Robin Hood (avant premiere), Venus in Furs, Satisfaction, Joan of Arc, The Stone Age, and The Plays of Piero Heliczer (avant premiere), plus William Burroughs, Andy Warhol, The Velvet Underground, Jack Smith, and others.

23. THANKSGIVING SHOW
New York: Max’s Kansas City, 1970
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces the screening of Dirt, Joan of Arc, and The Autumn Feast at Max’s Kansas City in New York City on November 25, 1970

24. UNIVERSAL MUTANT THEATRE
New York: Universal Mutant Theatre, 1970
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, photocopy printed. Illustrated with a montage by Heliczer

According to BeatBooks catalog #86, announces screenings of films by Piero Heliczer, Ira Cohen, Marty Topp, Charles Henri Ford, Patti Lee Chenis, and Bruce Conner, “plus films by Schneider [Don Snyder?] Malanga &C a benefit for the museum of the future film school at Universal Mutant Theatre 141 Prince Street”, at midnight on December 11-12, 1970. The building on Prince Street, just outside Greenwich Village, was also home at the time to the Daughters of Bilitis, the first lesbian organization in the United States.

25. UNDERGROUND FILMS
Paris: The American Centre, 1972
Flyer, 8.5″, x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces screening of Heliczer’s Robin des Bois at The American Centre on January 28-29, 1972.

26. A MAJOR POETRY READING BY PIERO HELICZER
New York: Saint Marks Church, 1972
Flyer, 11″ x 8.5″, photocopy printed

Note: announces a reading at Saint Marks Church in New York on Wednesday, November 29, 1972

27. CROWN OF THE UNDERGROUND – PIERO HELICZER’S ST VALENTINES DAY SHOW
New York: Paris Filmmakers Coop, 1973
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, offset printed

According to BeatBooks catalog #86,  announces film screenings presented by the Paris Filmmakers Coop at Dramatis Personae at 114 West Street in New York on February 13-14, 1973. Lists the world premiere of “Heliczer’s latest film”, Robin Hood, along with Rushes from Ste Therese. Also lists screenings of Storm De Hirsch’s film, Shaman, A Tapestry for Sorcerers (1966), and Jonas In The Brig, newsreel footage of “Jonas Mekas shooting his filmed version of The Brig on the set of the Living Theatre production” (1964).

28. PARIS FILMMAKERS COOPERATIVE
Paris: The American Centre, 1972
Flyer, 8.5″, x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces screening of Heliczer’s Robin des Bois at The American Centre on January 28-29, 1972.

29. PARIS FILMMAKERS COOP
Paris: Paris Filmmakers Coop, 1976
Flyer, 8.25″ x 11.75″, offset printed

According to BeatBooks catalog #86,  announces screenings of three films by Piero Heliczer presented by the Paris Filmmakers Coop on April 10 and 17, 1976 at Theatre Mouffetard at 76 Rue Mouffetard in Paris. The first screening showed Autumn Feast (1961) and Dirt (1965), as well as films by Patti Lee Chenis and Ray Wisniewski; the second date showed Joan of Arc (c. mid-60s), and Couch by Andy Warhol. Heliczer co-founded the Paris Filmmakers Coop with mover/shaker and filmmaker Barbara Rubin and her friend, Pamela Badyk, a member of the American Living Theatre company, and its venue for screenings, as here, was invariably the cinema at “La Mouffe” the “Maison pour tous” on rue Mouffetard.

30. PARIS FILMMAKERS COOP
Paris: Paris Filmmakers Coop, 1976
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, offset printed

According to BeatBooks catalog #86,  announces a screening of films by Piero Heliczer presented by the Paris Filmmakers Coop at Theatre Mouffetard at 76 rue Mouffetard in Paris on May 15 and May 22, 1976. The first date featured Heliczer’s film Robin Hood and the second, Sainte Thérèse. The screenings also showed Yoghurt Subculture, a film by Patti Lee Chenis (who also appeared in Robin Hood), and Paul Sharits’s film, Nothing.

31. FOURTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE CORONATION…
Amsterdam: n.p., 1977
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces the fourth anniversary of Piero Heliczer’s Coronation as Emperor of Europe in Amsterdam on January 1-2, 1977, with a screening announced for January 3-4.

32. VOTE FOR PIERO HELICZER
Amsterdam: n.p., 1979
Flyer, 8.5″ x 13″, photocopy printed.

Note: prints a song text with musical notes and the slogan “Europe Without Piero Is Like A Song Without Words” with the credit line: “1979 Piero Heliczer. The Committee For The Restoration Of The Holy Roman Empire, Van Woustraat 5, 1074 AA Amsterdam”.

33. PIERO FOR PRESIDENT
New York: Rare Book Room, (c. 1985)
Flyer, 11″ x 8.5″, photocopy printed

According to BeatBooks catalog #86, reproduces a photograph of two Rabbis, captioned with one saying to the other: “I hear the Rabbi is running for President!”, and the other replying: “You mean, Piero Heliczer?”. A box below requests that signatures for Piero’s name to be on the ballot should be sent to the Rare Book Room at 125 Greenwich Avenue in New York. The flyer coincides with the period when Piero Heliczer was living on the streets of New York, wandering the city and marking its monuments and walls with his signature holograph, a capital ‘P’ inside a segmented circle, with the words ‘Vote for Piero Heliczer’ or ‘Piero Heliczer for President’.

34. PIERO HELICZERS BOOK STREET
New York: Piero Heliczers Book Street, (c. 1987)
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces “Piero Heliczers Book Street Waverly Place & Sixth Avenue”. Dates from the period Piero was living rough on the streets of New York and eking-out a meagre living by selling used books.

35. SUNDAYS CHILD
New York: Rare Book Room, (c. 1988)
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces the Rare Book Room’s publication of Heliczer’s autobiographical sketch, Sundays Child printing a brief descriptive blurb, and simultaneously announcing Heliczer’s campaign for the American presidency.The flyer coincides with the period when Heliczer was living on the streets of New York, wandering the city and marking its monuments and walls with his signature holograph, a capital ‘P’ inside a segmented circle, with the words ‘Vote for Piero Heliczer’ or ‘Piero Heliczer for President’.

36. PIERO HELICZER – FILM RETROSPECTIVE
New York: Film Art Fund, Inc., 1990
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces a series of screenings of Heliczer films during May and June, 1990 at the Anthology Film Archives. The flyer is illustrated with a collage of Andy Warhol with barbells and two nuns set against the backdrop of a crucifixion scene.

37. PIERO HELICZERS CHRISTMAS SHOW
New York: Saint Marks Church, 1990
Flyer, 8.5″ x 11″, photocopy printed

Note: announces “piero heliczer’s christmas show” on December 10, 1990 at Saint Marks Church, illustrated with a Dezo Hoffmann photo of the Beatles collaged against a backdrop of a bridge over the Seine (presumably referencing the group’s 1963-64 Christmas shows).

38. PIERO HELICZERS MYSTERIOUS REAPPEARANCE
New York: Knitting Factory, 1990
Flyer, 11″ x 8.5″, photocopy printed

Note: announces “piero heliczer’s mysterious reappearance” at the “knitting factory” on December 12, 1990, reproduces a Dezo Hoffmann photo of the Beatles with the addition of a large photo of Heliczer’s high school graduation photo from June 1954.

39. SCREENINGS OF DIRT AND AUTUMN FEAST
Amsterdam, Poets Cinema, 1992
Flyer, 11″ x 8.5″, photocopy printed

Note: announces screenings for Dirt and Autumn Feast on September 20, 1992 at Poets Cinema in Amsterdam.

Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts

fyp

 

Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts, published by Ed Sanders from a “secret location on the Lower East Side” of New York City,  was a deliberately provocative mimeographed periodical that ran for 13 issues from 1962 to 1965. Each issue featured line drawings by Sanders and included contributions from such writers and artists as Tuli Kupferberg, Carol Bergé, John Wieners, Andy Warhol, Ray Bremser, Lenore Kandel, Charles Olson, Joel Oppenheimer, Peter Orlovsky, Philip Whalen, Allen Ginsberg, Herbert Huncke, Julian Beck, Frank O’Hara, Leroi Jones, Diane Di Prima, William Burroughs, Gary Snyder, Robert Kelly, Judith Malina, Carl Solomon, Gregory Corso, Robert Duncan, Robert Creeley, Michael McClure, Ted Berrigan, Joe Brainard, Gilbert Sorrentino, and many others.


1. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 1, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Ed Sanders, February 1962
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 26 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

From the Editors Note: “Send me your banned manuscripts, your peace-grams, your cosmic data, your huddled masses yearning to be free, your collections of freak-beams, plans for the pacifist holocaust, I lift my speedoprint mimeo beside the golden door…”

Contents:
Jean Morton – “To Us”
Jean Morton – “Prayer”
Ed Sanders – “Soft-Man I”
Ed Sanders – “Soft-Man II”
Ed Sanders – “Soft-Man IIII”
Ed Sanders – “Soft-Man V”
Ed Sanders – “Soft-Man VI”
Allen Hoffman – “Hymn to Amun-Ra-Sanders, The Sun Disc”
Paul Berner – “Freak-Gram: Some Notes on Nonviolent Suicide”
Nelon Barr – “A Bouquet of Fuck Yous”

2. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 2, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Ed Sanders, April 1962
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 34 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

From the Editors Note: “Send me yr goddamn manuscripts. Cut me in on yr freak-beams. I’ll print anything.”

Contents:
Margaret X – “Ronnie: An Unapproved Litany”
Eric Weinberger – “Brownsville Jail — Mar. 12, 1962”
Ed Sanders – “Cemetery Hill”
Ed Sanders – “Soft Man VII”
Ed Sanders – “Soft Man VIII”
Ed Sanders – “Soft Man IX”
Robert Brookings Gore – “Fishy”
Robert Brookings Gore – “What?”
Jim Forest – “Notes Written in the Night”
Nelson Barr – “Ash Wednesday Revisited”
Nelson Barr – “A Bouquet of Fuckyous, offering #2”

3. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 3, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Ed Sanders, June 1962
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 38 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

From the Editors Note: “Send me yr banned manuscripts, fire me yr cosmic data, visions of the incomprehensible, arcanics, outpukes from the jack-batty, notes from the all, I’ll print anything.”

Contents:
Penny X – “Crotch Poem”
Al Fowler – “Poems, Wargasms, Hymns to Young Men & Women”
Ed Sanders – “Poems”
Ed Sanders – “Soft Man X”
Bob K – “Canticle”
John Harriman – “Two Poems While High”
Nelson Barr – “A Bouquet of Fuckyous”
Tuli Kupferberg – “Pacifist Primer”
Tuli Kupferberg – “6996th Psalm”
Tuli Kupferberg – “Cool”

4. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 4, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Ed Sanders, August 1962
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 54 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

From the Editor’s Note: “Send me yr bloody manuscripts! I’ll print anything”

Contents:
Eric Weinberger – [untitled] “For me/ even for me…”
Carol Berge – “Lovesong”
Michael McClure – [untitled] “The mind pain comes over me…”
Taylor Mead – [untitled] “I can’t write…”
C.V.J. Anderson – “August Sixth for Reiko”
John Wieners – “Cocaine”
Ray Bremser – “Lacerations Manuscript”
Ed Sanders – “from On Guerilla Lovefare”
Tuli Kupferberg – “The Man with the Scissors”
John C. Harriman – “3 for Diane Wakoski”
Elin Paulson – [untitled] “in a forever eternity…”
John Keys – “Poem” [“what has made us…”]
John Keys – “New Age of Arm Lifting”
John Keys – “Remembrances of Things Past”
Steve Wever – [untitled] “Your Azzole is…”
Mary E. Mayo – “The Highlanders”
Jackson Mac Low – “Observations in My Neighborhood”
Nelson Barr – “Darkangelgirl”
Nelson Barr – “A Bouquet of Fuckyous, offering #4”

5. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 5, Vol. 1, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Ed Sanders, December 1962
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 62 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

From the Editor’s Note: “Barf me your frick data. Retch me in on your bable vectors, your arcanics, your spew, I’ll print anything.”

Contents:
Ed Sanders – “Fuck You, The Talk of the Town”
Charles Olson – “Three Poems from The Maximus Poems”
Lenore Kandel – [untitled] “to fuck with love…”
Al Fowler – “Heroin”
Al Fowler – “Takeoff”
Al Fowler – “Larson O.D.’s; Fowler Scare Shitless”
Al Fowler – “The Hip Lady Pacifist…”
Al Fowler – “Cock City”
Al Fowler – “Caroline”
Al Fowler – “Vision”
Barbara Moraff – [untitled] “Spaniel luz…”
Mark Samara – “Camping Out with Ed Sanders”
Ed Marshall – “Steps of Entering the Skin”
Bonnie Bremser – “Fowl-Play”
Millard Friedman – “Opening”
Ron Rice – [untitled] “Creation from zero…”
Charles Polandik – “Thru Service from New York to Chicago”
Joel Oppenheimer – “A Little Mayan Head”
John Keys – “Revision”
Kirby Congdon – [untitled] “I stagger under the boat…”
John Thomas – “Fat Dr. Bonelli”
Ed Sanders – “Blow Job Poem”
Mary Mayo – “Canticle”
Nelson Barr – “A Bouquet of Fuckyous”

6. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 5, Vol. 2, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Ed Sanders, December 1962
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 68 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

From the Editor’s Note: “Skin me with your poetry, your banned manuscripts, your babble, plans for the pacifist holocaust, I’ll print anything.”

Contents:
John Wieners – [untitled] “You talk of going…”
Tuli Kupferberg – “I Say”
Carol Berge – “How to Screw a Bear and Find God”
Taylor Mead – “from His Diary”
Paul Blackburn – “The One-Night Stand”
Barry Wallenstein – “Times of Our Time”
Ray Bremser – “Eternity Grinding Allen’s Giant Beyonds”
Ray Bremser – “Rolling with the Wind”
David Rattray – “In God We Trust”
John Keys – “Poem for Charles Olson come Summer”
Hank Dixon – “Billie the Kid Revisited”
Elin Paulson – “With Love Still”
Pasquale Cocco – [untitled] “I’d love to…”
Bob K. – “from Carolcurla”
Nelson Barr – “Call Me not Back”
Nelson Barr – “Another Bouquet of Fuckyous”
Al Fowler – “Babble”
Al Fowler – “I Want You”
Al Fowler – “Musee de Beaux Enfant”
Al Fowler – “Child”
Al Fowler – “Democracy”
Al Fowler – “Telephone Conversation”
Al Fowler – “The Room. Junk Withdrawal”

7. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 5, Vol. 3, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Ed Sanders, May 1963
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 80 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

Contents:
Ed Sanders – “Spurt Spurt”
Lenore Kandel – “Hero the Rider”
Rochelle Owens – “To an Arrogant Fart”
Peter Orlovsky – “Second Sex Experiment”
Jean Forest – “Queen #3”
Carol Berge – “The Love Hang”
Marc Samara – “Camping Out with Taylor Mead”
Joel Oppenheimer – “A Long Testament”
Ray Bremser – “The Cup of Sex”
Robert Kaye – “Mawdroogle”
John Thomas – “Okay Okay”
John Thomas – “For Basho”
Jay Socin – “Graffiti in a Public John”
Al Katzman – “Lament”
Barbara Moraff – “The Abdominal Snowman”
Barbara Moraff – [untitled] “during the past few months…”
Nancy Ellison – “Caca Caca”
John Keys – “Poem for the Aircraft”
Martin Segal – [untitled] “Here I have come…”
Taylor Mead – “Taylor Mead on Dope”
Jackson Mac Low – “19th Light Poem”
Szabo – “Poem for Marilyn”
Nelson Barr – “Bouquet of Fuckyous”

8. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 5, Vol. 4, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Ed Sanders, Summer 1963
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 74 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

Contents:
Ed Sanders – “Defiance”
Szabo – “Poem for Hustlers”
Lenore Kandel – “Grant Avenue”
Philip Whalen – “Duerden says: ‘Life is Therapy'”
Paul Blackburn – “Here They Go”
Joel Oppenheimer – “Public Affairs”
Joel Oppenheimer – “Poem in Praise of Perseverance”
John Harriman – “Antoninous Paper Number Two”
Barbara Moraff – [untitled] “im a hip song mistress…”
Barbara Moraff – [untitled] “ground like barren…”
Barbara Moraff – [untitled] “hiking out of sight…”
Barbara Moraff – [untitled] “the reactions…”
George Economou – “Carmen Mentulae”
Carol Berge – “An Answer to one of the Other Women”
Harry Fainlight – “42nd Street”
Rochelle Owens – “Manananimal”
George Montgomery – “Cockman”
Andrew Hoyem – “An Invocation to the Muse in her Low Haunts”
Al Fowler – “Junky II – Speedball”
Al Fowler – “Statutory Rape – (the plea)”
Al Fowler – “Junky”
Ed Sanders – “Three Poems from The Gobble Gang Poems”
Michael McClure – “Fuck Essay”
Nelson Barr – “A Bouquet of Fuckyous, offering #8”

9. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Number 5, Volume 5, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Ed Sanders, December 1963
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 90 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

From the Editor’s Note: “Manuscripts! Manuscripts! puke us your spew, magic, music, loves, logoi, and vapours! Onward in the Re-vectors, all you blazing m.f.’s”

Contents:
Ed Sanders – “Total Assault on the Culture”
Allen Ginsberg – “The Change: Kyoto-Tokyo Express July 18, 1963”
Isis – “Incantation for the REvival of the Dead Osiris”
Robert Kaye – “8th & 42nd”
Robert Kaye – “for Quang Duc”
Robert Kaye – [untitled] “under falling water…”
Robert Kaye – [untitled] “i’m dead…”
Lenore Kandel – “Love Fuck Poem”
Tuli Kupferberg – “A Black & White Manifesto”
Peter Orlovsky – “Allen Jerking Off on Bed”
Mary Mayo – “The Dream of the Starving Birds”
Robert Nichols – “Message”
Robert Nichols – “Bakhunin”
Diane Wakowski – “Ordinary Poem, to Bob”
Julian Beck – [untitled] “horse pimples…”
Julian Beck – “Anarchy”
Julian Beck – [untitled] “that the collective not be…”
John Keys – “Impressions Taken from the Same Canteen”
John Keys – “Erikson”
John Keys – “Lesson 2”
Jim Standish – “Three Poems from the Mushroom Poems”
Harry Fainlight – “O London”
Herbert Huncke – “The Party”
Nelson Barr – “Love Poem”
Nelson Barr – “A Bouquet of Fuck Yous, offering #9”

10. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Number 5, Volume 6, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Ed Sanders, April/May 1963
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 108 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

From the Editor’s Note: “Manuscripts!! we need high level poetic data, music, criticism, reviews, surveys, stories, magic, etc…. while we exist we should like to puke forth some totally mind-stomping issues…”

Contents:
Ed Sanders – “A Call to Action”
Harry Fainlight – “For the Ghost of Hart Crane”
Allen Ginsberg – “Walt Whitman”
Harry Fainlight – “Le Poete a Quatorze Ans”
Harry Fainlight – “Mescaline Notes”
Frank O’Hara – “Un Chant d’Amor”
Frank O’Hara – “In the Movies”
Peter Orlovsky – “Thank God….”
Ray Bremser – “Three Small Prater to the Genii”
Ray Bremser – “Frontal Phrenal Fit”
Al Fowler – [untitled] “are you going to the…”
Al Fowler – “Soup Poem”
Al Fowler – “My Last Shot of Stuff”
Szabo – “The Szabo Poems”
Diane Di Prima – “An Anniversary Poem, for Alan”
Diane Di Prima – “Take 3/16/61”
Diane Di Prima – “Take 3/15/61”
LeRoi Jones – “Houdini”
LeRoi Jones – “Letter to Elijah Muhammed”
LeRoi Jones – “Political Poem”
LeRoi Jones – “Double Feel”
Joel Oppenheimer – “Fragments of a Letter from New York to San Francisco”
Joel Oppenheimer – “For Our Cousins”
Joel Oppenheimer – “Where are My Glasses”
Joel Oppenheimer – “Balso’s Blues”
Carol Berge – “Chant for Half the World”
John Keys – “Star: Saskatchewan Two”
Nancy Ellison – [untitled] “i lie long mornings…”
Nancy Ellison – [untitled] “weed that hides rock…”
Nancy Ellison – [untitled] “i feel my body covered with dust…”
Nelson Barr – [untitled] “wingdlass, stingsalt skald’s brow hornhelmed…”
Nelson Barr – “A Bouquet of Fuckyou’s, offering #10”

11. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Number 5, Volume 7, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Ed Sanders, September 1964
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 172 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art by Robert LaVigne and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

Contents:
Ed Sanders – “Resistance against Goon Squads”
Charles Olson – “West Gloucester”
John Wieners – “The Imperatrice”
John Wieners – “Confession”
John Wieners – “Le Chariot”
John Wieners – [untitled] “And if to die…”
Robert Creeley – “Something”
Robert Creeley – “Two Times”
Allen Ginsberg – “from Long Unfinished Poem”
Robert Duncan – “Old Testament”
Robert Duncan – “New Testament”
William Burroughs – “Fluck you fluck you fluck you”
Norman Mailer – “The Executioner’s Song”
Gary Snyder – “Hymn to the Goddess San Francisco in Paradise”
Gregory Corso – “God is a Masturbator”
Philip Whalen – “Statement of Condition”
Philip Whalen – “The Great Beyond Denver”
Philip Whalen – “Papyrus Catalogue”
Philip Whalen – “Vector Analysis”
Philip Whalen – “Against the Magic War: An Open Letter to Robert Duncan”
Michael McClure – “Airs from a Forgotten Book”
Judith Malina – “On the Day of the Death…”
Harry Fainlight – “The Spider”
Robert Kelly – “In Commentary on the Gospel…”
Robery Kelly – “Poem for Ed Sanders”
Carl Solomon – “Nobody Tells Me the Truth Any More”
Carl Solomon – “Stringing Them Along”
Carl Solomon – “Relationships”
Carl Solomon – “The Delinquents”
Carl Solomon – “The Lunatic and Modern Art”
Arnaut Daniel – “Sirventes”
Arnaut Daniel – “Sirventes” (trans. Paul Blackburn)
Al Fowler – “Junky”
Al Fowler – “Larson O.D.’s; Fowler Scared Shitless”
Al Fowler – “Heroin”
Al Fowler – “Takeoff”
Al Fowler – “The Room. Junk Withdrawal”
Al Fowler – “Junky II – Speedball”
Antonin Artaud – [untitled] “The message of…” (trans. Robert Cordier)
Philip Lamantia – “Blue Grace”
Alden Van Buskirk – “The Ivory Bastard”
Alden Van Buskirk – “Kitchen”
Alden Van Buskirk – “Last Will And”
Alden Van Buskirk – “from Forest Park Fragments”
Alden Van Buskirk – “Lami, Leather Nightingale”

12. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Volume 5, Number 8, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Fug Press, March 1965
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 154 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art by Andy Warhol and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

Contents:
Ed Sanders – “Fuck You – The Talk of the Town”
Lawrence Ferlinghetti – “To Fuck is to Love Again”
Michael McClure – “Poisoned Wheat”
Michael McClure – “Poem Cards”
Ed Sanders – “from the Gobble Gang Poems”
LeRoi Jones – “Word from the Right Wing”
LeRoi Jones – “Western Front”
Allen Ginsberg – “from Journals”
Allen Ginsberg – “Dream”
Ted Berrigan – “Sonnet III”
Ted Berrigan – “Sonnet LXVII”
Ted Berrigan – “Sonnet LXXVI”
Ted Berrigan – “Sonnet LXXVIII”
W.H. Auden -“A Gobble Poem”
Gerard Malanga – “Friends”
Vincent Ferrini – “IHS”
Peter Orlovsky – “Three Pages of Drawings with Notes…”
Harry Fainlight – “Street”
Gergory Corso – “At the Big A”
Claude Pelieu – “Four Shriek Pages…”
Al Fowler – [untitled] “man is the disconnected beast…”
Elise Cowan – [untitled] “A cockroach…”
Elsie Cowan – [untitled] “The first eye opens…”
Elsie Cowan – [untitled] “Easy to love…”
Elsie Cowan – [untitled] “I took the skin of corpses…”
John Keys – “The Relationships”
Robert Kaye – [untitled] “suffering cannot be merited…”
John Francis Putman – “Mythology”
John Francis Putman – “Freebie Peek at Remaindered Girlie Mags”
John Francis Putman – “All Saints Day”
Carol Berge – “Thank You”
Bill Fritsch – [untitled] “I stared into your…”
Al Katzman – “Directions I (for John Keys)”
Al Katzman – “The Bloodletting”
Gerard Malanga – “In the pores of his forehead…”
Gerard Malanga – “Some Thoughts of Jean Shrimpton”
Gerard Malanga – “Charles Olson among the White Trees”
Nancy Ellison – [untitled] “I sing the grave…”
Nelson Barr – “Guernica”

13. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Volume 5, Number 9
New York: Ed Sanders, June 1965
First edition, side-stapled in printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 100 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover art and illustrations by Ed Sanders.

Contents:
Ed Sanders – “Notes from the Editor”
Joe Brainard – untitled illustration
Pindar – “The First Olympian Ode”
Tom Veitch – “You Got a Point There, Pop”
Harry Fainlight – “Interregnum”
Harry Fainlight – “Image for Fowler”
Harry Fainlight – “The Question”
Harry Fainlight – “Cruising”
Harry Fainlight – “To Noreen”
Harry Fainlight – “Magic Song”
Gilbert Sorrentino – “from The Perfect Fiction”
John Wieners – “Memories of You”
Alden Van Buskirk – “The Pimple”
Szabo – [untitled] “Billy the Kid, the criminal…”
Taylor Mead – “My Monthly”
Robert Kelly – “Sporting News”
Lenore Kandel – “In the Comics”
David Henderson – [untitled] “David A. Wood…”
Al Fowler – [untitled] “night. in the orchards…”
Janine Pommey – “On Train From Living Theatre Heist to Paris”
Ted Berrigan – “Book Review”


References Consulted:

Clay, Steven and Rodney Phillips. A SECRET LOCATION ON THE LOWER EAST SIDE: ADVENTURES IN WRITING, 1960-1980
New York: New York Public Library / Granary Books, 1998

Marx, Jake. “Index to Fuck You / A Magazine of the Arts” in THE SERIF: QUARTERLY OF THE KENT STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES, Volume VIII, Number 3
Kent: The Kent State University Libraries, September 1971


Online Resources:

· Boo-Hooray – Ed Sanders: Fuck You / A Magazine of the Arts

· From a Secret Location – Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts

· Reality Studio – Fuck You Press Archive

· Ubu Web – Fuck You: A Magazine of the Arts (1962-1965)

Piero Heliczer

Piero Giorgio Heliczer (June 20, 1937 in Rome, Italy – July 22, 1993 in Préaux-du-Perche, France) ph_foldingchairwas an Italian-American writer, screenwriter, poet, actor, publisher and underground filmmaker. Heliczer moved to Paris in 1957, where he established his imprint The Dead Language press, publishing his own poetry and later, work by authors Anselm Hollo, Gregory Corso, Jack Smith, and others. In the 1960s, Heliczer moved from Paris to London to New York, and, during that time, made his first film and soon fell in with the crowd that was buzzing around Andy Warhol’s Factory… (more)

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Piero Heliczer & The Dead Language Press
Opening Party, February 20, 6 – 9 PM

Exhibit runs every day February 21 – March 14
Mon. – Fri. 11am – 6pm
Sat./Sun. 12pm – 4pm

Boo-Hooray
265 Canal St, 6th Floor
New York, NY 10013