Tag Archives: Gregory Corso

Loujon Press

Jon and Louise “Gypsy Lou” Webb. Photographer unknown.

In the Fall of 1961, Jon and Louise “Gypsy Lou” Webb published the first issue of their avant-garde poetry and prose magazine, The Outsider. Handset and letterpress printed, the journal straddled the line between traditional books and modern works of art, and the journal made an outsized impact on the literary world, shining a light on the talents of Beat Generation, Black Mountain and other avant-garde and counterculture poets, writers, and artists of the era.

In all, Loujon Press published three issues of The Outsider (one a double issue), and two books each by poet Charles Bukowski and novelist Henry Miller. These publications received at least as much praise for their quality as physical artifacts as they did for the poems and prose that made up their editorial matter. It seems like a small catalogue, but the remarkable artistry, craftsmanship, and pioneering spirit have earned the press a much larger place in history.

As art writer Nathan Martin commented, “Loujon operated during a particular moment in the history of artistic publishing in America … and remains a distinctive and compelling entity at the intersection of fine-press publishing, counterculture literature, and the French Quarter from which it emerged.”


Loujon Press Checklist:

1. The Outsider, Vol. 1, No. 1, edited by Jon Edgar Webb
New Orleans: Loujon Press, Fall 1961
First edition, side-stapled and bound into printed and photo-illustrated wrappers, 6” x 9”, 101 pages, 3100 copies, letterpress printed with handset type on a C&P handpress by Jon and Louise Webb. Associate Editor: Louise “Gypsy Lou” Webb; Advisory Editors: Marvin Bell, Margaret Randall, Jory Sherman, Edwin Morgan, Melville Hardiment, Sinclair Beiles; Consultant: Walter Lowenfels; illustrations: F. Salantrie.

  1. Ephemera:
        1. Prospectus. 5.75” x 17.75” sheet folded once to make four pages, lists contributors and includes order form.
  • Offprints:
      1. Corso, Gregory. “The American Way” [offprint of page 9] [1]
      2. Bukowski, Charles. “A Charles Bukowski Album” [offprint of pages 47-54] (Krumhansl 6)
      3. Miller, Henry. Letters To Lowenfels. [offprint of pages 63-66] [2] (Shifreen & Jackson A140)
      4. Burroughs, William S. Operation Soft Machine. [offprint of pages 73-77] [3]
      5. McClure, Michael. Spontaneous Hymn To Kundalini [offprint of page 46] [4]
  • Contents:
    1. Edson, Russell. “Editorial” – 1:1, 3
    2. Webb, Jon Edgar. “The Editor’s Bit: Public Square” – 1:1, 4
    3. Beiles, Sinclair. “Metabolic C Movies” – 1:1, 5
    4. Gordon, Stuart. “Metabolic C Movies” – 1:1, 5
    5. Corso, Gregory. “The American Way” – 1:1, 9
    6. Webb, Jr., Jon Edgar. “A Peek Over The Wall” – 1:1, 15
    7. Giudici, Ann. untitled [“Be careful when you step…”] – 1:1, 17
    8. Giudici, Ann. untitled [“I was a child…”] – 1:1, 17
    9. Giudici, Ann. untitled [“Can you pause and stay…”] – 1:1, 18
    10. Di Prima, Diane. “Lord Jim” – 1:1, 19
    11. Grant, John. “On The Dot” – 1:1, 20
    12. Haines, Paul. “…Had Spent Laughing” – 1:1, 23
    13. Snyder, Gary. “Xrist” – 1:1, 24
    14. Turnbull, Gael. “A Hill” – 1:1, 25
    15. Olson, Charles. untitled [“Borne down by…”] – 1:1, 26
    16. Dorn, Edward. “Like A Message On Sunday” – 1:1, 27
    17. Ginsberg, Allen. “The End (to Kaddish)” – 1:1, 28
    18. Orlovsky, Peter. “Snale Poem” – 1:1, 29
    19. Hughes, Langston. “Doorknobs” – 1:1, 30
    20. Martinez, Juan. “Work Song” – 1:1, 31
    21. Sorrentino, Gilbert. “Ave Atque Vale” – 1:1, 35
    22. Lowenfels, Walter. “Good-Bye Jargon, Elegy for a Small Press” – 1:1, 36
    23. Lowenfels, Walter. “Welcome Home to Cubby” – 1:1, 37
    24. Corman, Cid. “Post Mortem” – 1:1, 38
    25. Corman, Cid. “Sempre D’amore” – 1:1, 38
    26. Ferlinghetti, Lawrence. “Underwear” – 1:1, 39
    27. Bremser, Ray. “On Prevalence” – 1:1, 42
    28. Randall, Margaret. “Series of Seven” – 1:1, 43
    29. Brand, Millen. “Swinging Off Swamp Creek” – 1:1, 44
    30. Creeley, Robert. “The End of the Day” – 1:1, 45
    31. Creeley, Robert. “Mind’s Heart” – 1:1, 45
    32. Creeley, Robert. “The Bird” – 1:1, 45
    33. McClure, Mike. “Spontaneous Hymn to Kundalini” – 1:1, 46
    34. Bukowski, Charles. “Hooray Say The Roses” – 1:1, 48
    35. Bukowski, Charles. “Pay Your Rent or Get Out” – 1:1, 48
    36. Bukowski, Charles. “Shoes” – 1:1, 49
    37. Bukowski, Charles. “I Am With the Roots of Flowers” – 1:1, 50
    38. Bukowski, Charles. “Go With the Rockets & the Blondes” – 1:1, 51
    39. Bukowski, Charles. “A Real Thing, a Good Woman” – 1:1, 51
    40. Bukowski, Charles. “To a High Class Whore I Refused” – 1:1, 52
    41. Bukowski, Charles. “Old Man, Dead in a Room” – 1:1, 52
    42. Bukowski, Charles. “Love in a Back Room on the Row” – 1:1, 53
    43. Bukowski, Charles. “Nothing Subtle” – 1:1, 53
    44. Bukowski, Charles. “And Then: Age” – 1:1, 53
    45. Sward, Robert. “Momma–, Mountain” – 1:1, 55
    46. Ristau, Harland. “M’sippi Town” – 1:1, 56
    47. Wilson, Colin. “Some Comments On The Beats & Angries” – 1:1, 57
    48. Sherman, Jory. “Dear Liz” – 1:1, 60
    49. Hedley, Leslie Woolf. “Naked In My Century” – 1:1, 62
    50. Miller, Henry. “Letters To Lowenfels” – 1:1, 62
    51. Jones, LeRoi. “The Southpaw” – 1:1, 67
    52. Jones, LeRoi. “Bo Peep” – 1:1, 67
    53. Jones, LeRoi. “X” – 1:1, 67
    54. Jones, LeRoi. “Boswell” – 1:1, 68
    55. Jones, LeRoi. “Dr. Jive” – 1:1, 68
    56. Bell, Marvin. “Portrait of a Skeleton” – 1:1, 69
    57. Bell, Marvin. “Winter Poem” – 1:1, 69
    58. Epstein, Lester. “Demonstrate Your Culture…” – 1:1, 70
    59. Epstein, Lester. “Moment” – 1:1, 71
    60. Epstein, Lester. “Cold Coffee” – 1:1, 71
    61. Zahn, Curtis. “Reprimand For A Compromised Love-Object” – 1:1, 72
    62. Burroughs, William S. “Operation Soft Machine” – 1:1, 74
    63. Kaja. “from: The Emerald City, For Gregory Corso” – 1:1, 78
    64. Crews, Judson. “Rel Bore Speng Lule” – 1:1, 79
    65. Crews, Judson. “Pastoral” – 1:1, 79
    66. Thompson, Tracy. “Stranger” – 1:1, 79
    67. Carroll, Paul. “What Did Your Face Look Like…” – 1:1, 80
    68. Oden, G. C. “Lay Your Head Here” – 1:1, 81
    69. May, James Boyer. “The Salutary Snare, for Colin Wilson” – 1:1, 82
    70. Schleifer, Marc D. “Here & There, for Marian’s Show” – 1:1, 82
    71. Pfisterer III, Frederick. “Dolorous Somewhere Behind” – 1:1, 83
    72. Frumkin, Gene. “The Fat Pigeon” – 1:1, 84
    73. Williams, Jonathan. “The Big House, For Sherwood Anderson” – 1:1, 84
    74. Corrington, William. “Hard Man” – 1:1, 85
    75. Boyle, Kay. “Print from a Lucite Block” – 1:1, 85
    76. Blackburn, Paul. “Death Watch: Veille D’hiver” – 1:1, 86
    77. Eshleman, Clayton. “Red Shoes (from Songs For Exile)” – 1:1, 86
    78. Kupferberg, Tuli. “Great” – 1:1,87
    79. Moraff, Barbara. “A Little Spur” – 1:1, 88
    80. Abrams, Sam. “Bodies Only” – 1:1, 88
    81. McGuire, Terence. “Mid-Morning” – 1:1, 88

2. The Outsider, Vol. 1, No. 2, edited by Jon Edgar Webb
New Orleans: Loujon Press, Summer 1962
First edition, side-stapled and bound into printed and photo-illustrated wrappers, 6” x 9”, 112 pages, 3100 copies, letterpress printed on a 8″ x 12″ C&P new series motorized press by Jon and Louise Webb. Associate Editor: Louise “Gypsy Lou” Webb; illustrations: Ben Tibbs, Frank Salantrie, Malcolm Paul Newman.

  • Offprints:
      1. Burroughs, William S. Wilt Caught In Time. [offprint of pages 3-4] [4]
      2. Miller, Henry. The Henry Miller To Lowenfels Letters. [offprint of pages 73-80] 2 (Shifreen & Jackson A140)
  • Contents:
    1. Burroughs, William S. “Wilt Caught In Time” – 1:2, 3
    2. Masters, R. E. L. “Editorial” – 1:2, 5
    3. Webb, Jon Edgar. “The Editor’s Bit” – 1:2, 6
    4. Bukowski, Charles. “Sick Leave” – 1:2, 7
    5. Johnson, Kay. “from: The Fourth Hour” – 1:2, 8
    6. Oppenheimer, Joel. “A Long Way” – 1:2, 10
    7. Oppenheimer, Joel. “The Present” – 1:2, 11
    8. Nemerov, Howard. “The Iron Characters” – 1:2, 13
    9. Edson, Russell. “There Was” – 1:2, 14
    10. Eigner, Larry. untitled [“the sky cross the desert…”] – 1:2, 15
    11. Eigner, Larry. untitled [“visiting yesterday…”] – 1:2, 16
    12. Eigner, Larry. untitled [“An easy death…”] – 1:2, 17
    13. Eigner, Larry. untitled [“all these cripples…”] – 1:2, 18
    14. Eigner, Larry. untitled [“that’s odd…”] – 1:2, 19
    15. Dorn, Edward. “The Argument Is” – 1:2, 20
    16. Corso, Gregory. “Poems From Berlin, First Week’s
    17. Impression” – 1:2, 21
    18. Bremser, Ray. “On The Nature” – 1:2, 24
    19. Mayes, Richard. “Lament” – 1:2, 28
    20. Johnson, Kay. “Poems From Paris” – 1:2, 29
    21. Frumkin, Gene. “The Poet On His Lunch Hour” – 1:2, 34
    22. Morgan, Edwin. “Jean Genet: A Legend, To Be Legible” – 1:2, 35
    23. Hollo, Anselm. “They Fatted The Calf” – 1:2, 40
    24. Stoloff, Carolyn. “Something Diseased” – 1:2, 42
    25. Jacobson, David B. “Lecture” – 1:2, 42
    26. Bukowski, Charles. “To A Lady Who Believes Me Dead” – 1:2, 43
    27. Johnson, Kay. “Quick, Someone’s Coming” – 1:2, 44
    28. Webb, Jon Edgar. “Suddenly Over” – 1:2, 45
    29. Major, Clarence. “Dream In Ruins” – 1:2, 45
    30. Field, Edward. “Ah, Linger A While, Thou Art So Fair” – 1:2, 46
    31. Mason, Mason Jordan. “Mysterious As Any Woman Be” – 1:2, 47
    32. Hazard, Geoffrey. “The Dubliner” – 1:2, 47
    33. Moraff, Barbara. “Dear Solomon” – 1:2, 48
    34. Musial, Frank. “Room” – 1:2, 48
    35. Giudici, Ann. “Remember?” – 1:2, 49
    36. Oden, G. C. “Low Calvary” – 1:2, 49
    37. Bell, Marvin. “Pipecleaner, For Thin Dorothy” – 1:2, 50
    38. Kaja. “from: The Emerald City, For Gregory Corso” – 1:2, 50
    39. Genet, Jean. “from: Le Pecheur Du Suquet” – 1:2, 52
    40. Purdy, A. W. “Love Poem” – 1:2, 53
    41. Madaio, Louise. “The Wine Is Red (from Black Olives)” – 1:2, 55
    42. McGrath, Thomas. “from: Letter To An Imaginary Friend” – 1:2, 59
    43. Corrington, William. “Surreal For Lorca” – 1:2, 61
    44. Williams, Jonathan. “The Anchorite” – 1:2, 62
    45. Lowenfels, Walter. “Editorial” – 1:2, 64
    46. Lamantia, [Philip]. “Last Days Of San Francisco” – 1:2, 66
    47. Kerouac, Jack. “Sept. 19, 1961 Poem” – 1:2, 68
    48. Margoshes, Dave. “Denise Levertov” – 1:2, 71
    49. Margolis, William J. “from: The Mendicant Notebook, Vi (For Maxine)” – 1:2, 72
    50. Miller, Henry. “The Henry Miller To Lowenfels Letters” – 1:2, 73
    51. Finlay, Ian Hamilton. “Art Student” – 1:2, 81
    52. Tagliabue, John. “Now And Then In The Fluorescence A Slight Jerking Motion” – 1:2, 82
    53. Tagliabue, John. “’I Got Important Contacts’ Willy Loman Says” – 1:2, 82
    54. Tagliabue, John. “Side Show / U.S.A.” – 1:2, 83
    55. Tagliabue, John. “Those Mysterious Events That Stir Us” – 1:2, 83
    56. Tagliabue, John. “Tall Blonde Girl And Ballet Dancer – 1:2, 83
    57. Patchen, Kenneth. “letter to the editor and untitled paintings” – 1:2, 84
    58. Micheline, Jack. “Street Call New Orleans” – 1:2, 94
    59. Allen, Richard B. “Oldest of the Living Old” – 1:2, 97
    60. Borenstein, Larry. “Oldest of the Living Old” – 1:2, 103
    61. Jaffee, Allan & Sandra. “Oldest of the Living Old” – 1:2, 103
    62. Russell, Bill. “Oldest of the Living Old” – 1:2, 104
    63. Hentoff, Nat. “Oldest of the Living Old” – 1:2, 104
    64. Wilson, John S. “Oldest of the Living Old” – 1:2, 107
    65. Sperling, Jr., Godfrey. “Oldest of the Living Old” – 1:2, 107
    66. Hobson, Wilder. “Oldest of the Living Old” – 1:2, 107
    67. Giudici, Ann. “Didn’t He Ramble, For Steve Angrum” – 1:2, 111

3. The Outsider, Volume 1, Number 3, edited by Jon Edgar Webb
New Orleans: Loujon Press, Spring 1963
First edition, side-stapled and bound into printed and photo-illustrated wrappers, 6” x 9”, 138 pages, 2100 copies, letterpress printed by Jon and Louise Webb. . Associate Editor: Louise “Gypsy Lou” Webb; illustrations: Jackson Hensley, Ben Tibbs, Frank Salantrie.

  • Offprints:
      1. Miller, Henry. The Henry Miller To Lowenfels Letters. [offprint of pages 79-85] [5]
  • Contents:
    1. Webb, Jon Edgar. “Editorial: The Editor’s Bit” – 1:3, 0
      Patchen, Miriam. “Letters to the editors” – 1:3, 2
      Patchen, Kenneth. “Editorial” – 1:3, 3
      Johnson, Kay. “The White Room” – 1:3, 7
      Snyder, Gary. “Some Square Comes” – 1:3, 15
      Snyder, Gary. “Madly Whirling Downhill” – 1:3, 15
      Kearns, Lionel. “Stress-Axis Poems” – 1:3, 16
      Creeley, Robert. “More On Kearns” – 1:3, 20
      Woolf, Douglas. “Visitation” – 1:3, 22
      McClure, Michael. ” -Three Mad Sonnets (from 13 Mad Sonnets)” – 1:3, 29
      Sward, Robert. “Donna Is Her Name” – 1:3, 31
      Sward, Robert. “Museum” – 1:3, 32
      Sward, Robert. “Mr Attis & Lady C” – 1:3, 31
      Burroughs, William. “Take It To Cut City – U.S.A.” – 1:3, 35
      Boyd, Sue Abbott. “Journey” – 1:3, 40
      Boyd, Sue Abbott. “The Following Morning” – 1:3, 40
      Weeks, Robert Lewis. “Grand Opening” – 1:3, 41
      Layton, Irving. “On Re-Reading The Beats” – 1:3, 42
      Genet, Jean. “A Colloquy (from Le Pecheur Du Suquet)” – 1:3, 44
      Fisher, Roy. “Chirico” – 1:3, 46
      Fisher, Roy. “Something Unmade” – 1:3, 47
      Webb, Jon Edgar. “The Girl There” – 1:3, 49
      Wakowski, Diane. “The First Day” – 1:3, 54
      Norse, Harold. “The Pine Cone” 1:3, 55
      Solomon, Carl. “The Madman In The Looking Glass” – 1:3, 56
      Cuscaden, R. R. “Charles Bukowski: Poet In A Ruined Landscape” – 1:3, 62
      Corrington, William. “Charles Bukowski: Three Poems” – 1:3, 66
      Bukowski, Charles. “The Tragedy Of The Leaves” – 1:3, 67
      Bukowski, Charles. “The Priest And The Matador” – 1:3, 68
      Bukowski, Charles. “Old Man, Dead In A Room” – 1:3, 71
      Bukowski, Charles. “The House” – 1:3, 72
      Bukowski, Charles. “Event” – 1:3, 73
      Bukowski, Charles. “Dinner, Rain & Transport” – 1:3, 74
      Bukowski, Charles. “Letters to the editors” – 1:3, 77
      Miller, Henry. “The Henry Miller Lowenfels Letters” – 1:3, 79
      Eigner, Larry. “Then:” – 1:3, 86
      Corrington, William. “Communion (from Prayers For Mass In The Vernacular)” – 1:3, 87
      Jouffroy, Alain. “Fatherland” – 1:3, 88
      Hollo, Anselm. “Thalidomide” – 1:3, 90
      Moraff, Barbara. “Two For Syd” – 1:3, 97
      Motley, Willard. “The Burial” – 1:3, 98
      Miller, Raeburn. “The Drowned Boy” – 1:3, 101
      Rubin, Larry. “Etiquette For Americans” – 1:3, 102
      Neish, Alex. “Review: Naked Lunch” – 1:3, 104
      Charters, Samuel B. “Jazz In New Orleans: 1899 To 1957” – 1:3, 109
      Borenstein, E. L. “Jazz In New Orleans: 1957 To 1963” – 1:3, 117

4. Bukowski, Charles. It Catches My Heart In Its Hands / New & Selected Poems 1955-1963
New Orleans: Loujon Press, October 1963
First edition, sewn signatures in printed wraparound jacket, designed and printed by Jon Edgar Webb and Louise Webb, introduction by William Corrington, illustration by Frank Salantrie, dedicated to “Gypsy Lou” Webb, 7.5” x 10”, 102 pages, 777 copies, letterpress printed, published as Gypsy Lou Series #1.
(Dorbin A5)

  1. Ephemera:
      1. Publication announcement: 5” x 10.25”, with Miller quote (Shifreen & Jackson B145)
  • Contents:
    1. “The Tragedy Of The Leaves”, “I Cannot Stand Tears”, “Shoes”, “A Real Thing, A Good Woman”, “To The Whore Who Took My Poems”, “Worm”, “The State Of World Affairs From A 3rd Floor Window”, “The Japanese Wife”, “For Marilyn M.”, “The Life Of Borodin”, “Winter Comes In A Lot Of Places In August”, “No Charge”, “Truth’s A Hell Of A Word”, “The Sun Wields Mercy”, “A Literary Romance”, “Reprieve And Admixture”, “Conversation In A Cheap Room”, “Letter From The North”, “Okay, But Later”, “A Minor Impulse To Complain”, “The Dog”, “Nothing Subtle”, “The Twins”, “The Day It Rained At The Los Angeles County Museum”, “2 P.M. Beer”, “Hooray Say The Roses”, “The Sunday Artist”, “Old Poet”, “To A High Class Whore I Refused”, “Dinner, Rain And Transport”, “Poem For These 4”, “Regard Me”, “I Am With The Roots Of Flowers”, “The Race”, “Vegas”, “Pay Your Rent Or Get Out”, “Love Is A Piece Of Paper Torn To Bits”, “The House”, “I Wait In The White Rain”, “The Kings Are Gone”, “It Is Not Much”, “Side Of The Sun”, “The Talkers”, “A Pleasant Afternoon In Bed”, “9 Rings”, “Blasted”, “A Song For Sadists With A Place To Sit Down”, “The Priest And The Matador”, “Love And Fame And Death”, “My Father”, “People Come Thru…”, “The Gift”, “The Bird”, “The Singular Self”, “Counsel”, “The Ox”, “Wrong Number”, “Sundays Kill More Men Than Bombs”, “A Farewell Thing While Breathing”, “A Rat Rises”, “A 350 Dollar Horse And A Hundred Dollar Whore”, “Bull”, “I Write This Upon The Last Drink’s Hammer”, “The Virgins Of Christmas”, “I Think Of Hemingway”, “Old Man, Dead In A Room”

5. Bukowski, Charles. Crucifix In A Deathhand / New Poems 1963-65
New York: Lyle Stuart, April 1965
First edition, sewn signatures in printed wraparound jacket, designed and printed by Jon Edgar Webb and Louise Webb, etchings by Noel Rockmore, dedicated to Marina Louise Bukowski, 8.5” x 12.25”, 102 pages, 3100 copies, letterpress printed, published as Gypsy Lou Series #2.
(Dorbin A6)

  1. Ephemera:
      1. Publication announcement: 5.25” x 10”, with Miller quote (Shifreen & Jackson B164)
      2. Order form: 5” x 8.25”
  • Contents:
    1. “Sound Down the Street”, “I Think of Mice Cooling It”, “Butterfly”, “Sing to Gods or Kangaroos”, “View from the Screen”, “Not with Boldness”, “Crucifix in a Deathhand”, “When the Berry Bush Dies I’ll Swim Down the Green River with My Hair on Fire”, “Mother and Son”, “Sunflower”, “Grass”, “Fuzz”, “Seahorse”, “A Report upon the Consumption of Myself”, “No Lady Godiva”, “The Workers”, “Beans with Garlic”, “Mama”, “Machineguns, Towers and Timeclocks”, “Good Morning, Brother, How Are You?”, “Something for the Touts, the Nuns, the Grocery Clerks and You”, “The Loss, The Loss, The Loss”, “Sway with Me”, “Lack of Almost Everything”, “No Argument”, “No. 6”, “This”, “Don’t Come Round but if You Do”, “Startled Into Life like Fire”, “Stew”, “Qp”, “Lilies in My Brain”, “Itch, Come and Gone”, “I Am Dead but I Know the Dead Are Not Like This”, “Swept Away in Orangepeel And Whistle Yowl”, “At the End of Feet The Blackbird Walks”, “Let Them Go”, “Like a Violet in the Snow”, “All I Ask Is a Faint Chance”, “Letter from Too Far”, “See this Flower!”, “Pansies”, “I Was Born to Hustle Roses Down the Avenues of the Dead”, “Farewell, Foolish Objects”, “Man in the Sun”, “I Kneel”, “The Swans Walk my Brain in April it Rains”, “The Girls on Sunset Blvd.”, “Woman”, “Confession for those Who Do Not Breathe at Funerals”, “Like All The Years Wasted”, “They, all of Them, Know”, “A Nice Day”.

6. Miller, Henry. Order And Chaos Chez Hans Reichel
Tucson: Loujon Press, December 1966
First edition, perfect bound in printed wraparound jacket in printed slipcase, leather editions bound by the Schuberth Bookbindery of San Francisco, introductory statement by Karl Shapiro, introduction by Lawrence Durrell, photograph of Miller by Ina Paulandre tipped in, 9” x 9.75”, 87 pages, 1425 copies, letterpress printed, published as Gypsy Lou Series #3.
(Shifreen & Jackson A157a-g)

  1. Variant Issues:
      1. Crimson Oasis limited issue: 26 lettered copies signed, quarter leather binding (Shifreen & Jackson A157a)
      2. Blue Oasis limited issue: 99 copies signed, quarter leather binding (Shifreen & Jackson A157b)
      3. Cork issue: 1399 copies (Shifreen & Jackson A157c)
      4. Orange Oasis limited issue: 3 copies (Shifreen & Jackson A157d)
      5. Black Oasis limited issue: 11 copies lettered using letters to spell HENRY MILLER, quarter leather binding, bound in postcard from Miller to Jon Webb (Shifreen & Jackson A157e)
      6. Green Oasis limited issue: 11 copies lettered using letters to spell HENRY MILLER, quarter leather binding (Shifreen & Jackson A157f)
      7. Cork issue: 26 lettered copies (Shifreen & Jackson A157g)
  1. Ephemera:
      1. Publication announcement: 20” x 26” featuring a photograph of Miller and his bicycle (Shifreen & Jackson B181)
      2. Award announcement: 8.5” x 10”, printed in brown ink, TDC [Type Director’s Club] awards for typography, type direction, and design (see Shifreen & Jackson A157c)
      3. Award announcement: 8.5” x 9”, same as above but printed in blue ink and with slightly different text

7. The Outsider, Vol. 2, No. 4/5, edited by Jon Edgar Webb
New Orleans: Loujon Press, Winter 1968-69
First edition, issued in both wrappers and hardcover in printed dust-wrapper and photo-illustrated paper wrappers, 7.25” x 10.25”, 200 pages, 500 copies. Associate Editor: Louise “Gypsy Lou” Webb, illustrations: Ben Tibbs, Frank Salantrie, Kelsie Harder. Laid into this edition is “a sprig of flora from within a mile of Geronimo’s grave”, picked by Gypsy Lou and sealed in wax paper with letterpress printed partial wrap-around band.

  1. Ephemera:
      1. Order form: 5” x 8.25”
  • Contents:
    1. Kaprow, Allan. “Moving, A Happening” – 2:4/5, 0
      Goodger-Hill, Trevor. “Editorial” – 2:4/5, 1
      Plymell, Charles. “In Kansas” – 2:4/5, 2
      Taylor, David. “Panda” – 2:4/5, 3
      Edson, Russell. “The Toy Maker” – 2:4/5, 19
      Edson, Russell. “The Cult” – 2:4/5, 19
      Perchik, Simon. untitled [“He Wants To Know…”] – 2:4/5, 20
      Perchik, Simon. untitled [“The Kids Were First…”] – 2:4/5, 20
      Major, Clarence. “Weak Dynamite” – 2:4/5, 22
      Wantling, William. “That Night” – 2:4/5, 24
      Bartlett, Elizabeth. “The Walnut Tree” – 2:4/5, 26
      Greenberg, Alvin. “Taking A Stand” – 2:4/5, 27
      Severy, Bruce. “How We Do Things” – 2:4/5, 28
      Severy, Bruce. “Mud” – 2:4/5, 28
      Severy, Bruce. “From 400 Yards” – 2:4/5, 28
      Goodger-Hill, Trevor. “A Personal History” – 2:4/5, 30
      Creighton, John. “Green Hides, Lines To A Pale Lady” – 2:4/5, 32
      Eigner, Larry. untitled [“March The Route…”] – 2:4/5, 35
      Eigner, Larry. untitled [“The Great American Ballot-Box…”] – 2:4/5, 36
      Bukowski, Charles. “Kaakaa & Other Imolations” – 2:4/5, 37
      Bukowski, Charles. “Beef Tongue, for J.T.” – 2:4/5, 39
      Bukowski, Charles. “Like A Flyswatter” – 2:4/5, 41
      Bukowski, Charles. “The Last Round” – 2:4/5, 42
      Di Prima, Diane. “From: Spring and Autumn Annals: A Celebration for Freddie” – 2:4/5, 45
      Levertov, Denise. “Late June 1968” – 2:4/5, 51
      Levertov, Denise. “Not to Have” – 2:4/5, 51
      Durrell, Lawrence. “?” – 2:4/5, 52
      Mccord, Howard. “Descent into Birth” – 2:4/5, 53
      Meltzer, David. “This is a Nation of Keepers Who Had No Time to Become Gods” – 2:4/5, 54
      Cooperman, Stanley. “New York: February, 1968” – 2:4/5, 55
      Cooperman, Stanley. “Cappelbaum’s Halloween” – 2:4/5, 56
      Katz, Steve. “One Kind of Tune” – 2:4/5, 58
      Katz, Steve. “& A More Similar Tune” – 2:4/5, 58
      Randall, Margaret. “Erongaricuaro, for My Friends at the Molino” – 2:4/5, 59
      Wright, Jay. “Pastel” – 2:4/5, 60
      Morris, Richard. “Foreword to Keslie Artwork” – 2:4/5, 61
      Harder, Kelsie. untitled [“Cartoons”] – 2:4/5, 61
      Hamburger, Michael. “Travelling” – 2:4/5, 77
      Stoloff, Carolyn. “Wind and the Earth” – 2:4/5, 79
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“It Came on Me…”] – 2:4/5, 80
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“An Old House…”] – 2:4/5, 80
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“Oh It Wasn’t So Much…”] – 2:4/5, 81
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“Too Many Years Pass…”] – 2:4/5, 82
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“Leaving This Clumsy Town…”] – 2:4/5, 82
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“Could I Believe…”] – 2:4/5, 83
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“Heaped Between The Letters The Postcards…”] – 2:4/5, 83
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“The Madness Is Power And What…”] – 2:4/5, 83
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“I Spoke To Jenny…”] – 2:4/5, 84
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“Legendary Men In The Forest…”] – 2:4/5, 84
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“And When They Killed Him…”] – 2:4/5, 84
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“Finding New Bones…”] – 2:4/5, 85
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“Some Jerk With Baltic-Brained…”] – 2:4/5, 86
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“This Tender Minute…”] – 2:4/5, 86
      Grapes, Marcus J. untitled [“Some Of Us…”] – 2:4/5, 87
      Haines, John. “Under The Barracks” – 2:4/5, 88
      Haines, John. “In The Styrofoam Mountains” – 2:4/5, 88
      Haines, John. “From The Rooftops” – 2:4/5, 89
      Kelly, Robert. “Landing Cod (From The Common Shore)” – 2:4/5, 90
      Gast, David K. “Teresa” – 2:4/5, 93
      Patchen, Miriam. untitled [“Letter To The Editors”] – 2:4/5, 94
      Sandberg, David. untitled [“Please Do Not Ring Or Knock…”] – 2:4/5, 96
      Thomas, Norman. untitled [“If You Visit Patchen…”] – 2:4/5, 97
      Antoninus, Brother. untitled [“Word Of The Outsider’s Homage…”] – 2:4/5, 98
      Ginsberg, Allen. untitled [“I Met Kenneth Patchen At City Lights…”] – 2:4/5, 99
      May, James Boyer. untitled [“Kenneth Patchen’s Physical Presence…”] – 2:4/5, 100
      Norse, Harold. untitled [“He Is Part Of Youth…”] – 2:4/5, 105
      Brand, Millen. untitled [“I Used To Know Kenneth In The Village…”] – 2:4/5, 106
      Macdiarmid, Hugh. untitled [“I Have Been To The United States…”] – 2:4/5, 108
      Glover, David. untitled [“I Recall The First Thing I Ever Read…”] – 2:4/5, 109
      Rexroth, Kenneth. untitled [“Kenneth Patchen Is One Of…”] – 2:4/5, 112
      Corrington, John William. untitled [“I Still Remember…”] – 2:4/5, 113
      Porter, Bern. untitled [“Kenneth’s Monumental…”] – 2:4/5, 116
      Detro, Gene. “Interview: Patchen Interviewed” – 2:4/5, 117
      Ferlinghetti, Lawrence. untitled [“Kenneth Patchen & E.E. Cummings…”] – 2:4/5, 129
      Yates, Peter. untitled [“Know Him, This Man…”] – 2:4/5, 129
      Meltzer, David. untitled [“Here Is A Man Speaking…”] – 2:4/5, 130
      Young, Lafe. untitled [“Now, Nostalgically, I Realize…”] – 2:4/5, 131
      Conroy, Jack. untitled [“Since My Friend Webb…”] – 2:4/5, 132
      Eckman, Frederick. untitled [“A Decade Ago In A Review…”] – 2:4/5, 133
      Miller, Henry. untitled [“The First Thing One Would Remark…”] – 2:4/5, 134
      Blazek, Douglas. “A Few Small Things” – 2:4/5, 138
      Enslin, Ted. untitled [“As If It Were My Eye…”] – 2:4/5, 139
      Purdy, Al. “The Jackhammer Syndrome” – 2:4/5, 140
      Shelton, Richard. “The Crossing” – 2:4/5, 142
      Shelton, Richard. “& The Scars Will Be Covered” – 2:4/5, 143
      Wild, Peter. “Engine” – 2:4/5, 144
      Wild, Peter. “Snake Skin” – 2:4/5, 144
      Wild, Peter. “Saturday Afternoon On Sugar Loaf Mtn” – 2:4/5, 145
      Miller, Brown. “The Dark Oval” – 2:4/5, 146
      Duberstein, Helen. “Joke” – 2:4/5, 147
      Flaherty, Douglas. “Mrs. Godkin’s Son” – 2:4/5, 148
      Wilson, Keith. “All The Vanished Faces” – 2:4/5, 149
      Wilson, Keith. “The Wind Dragon in Spring” – 2:4/5, 150
      Holland, Barbara A. “Dust-Devil Man” – 2:4/5, 151
      Fowler, Gene. “The Natural History of Woman” – 2:4/5, 152
      Frumkin, Gene. “Poem for Childhood” – 2:4/5, 157
      levy, d.a. “For The Pigs, Rats & Adorable other Beasts of Saintly Cleveland, O” – 2:4/5, 157a
      Merton, Thomas. “Tibud Maclay” – 2:4/5, 158
      Bly, Robert. “Blown-Up German Fortifications Near Collioure” – 2:4/5, 159
      Norse, Harold. “Return to Pompeii” – 2:4/5, 160
      Gardien, Kent. “Poem Based on a List by Luis Bunel” – 2:4/5, 161
      Higgins, Dick. “Four Degrees” – 2:4/5, 164
      Antin, David. “Sociology” – 2:4/5, 166
      Hollo, Anselm. “Bouzouki Music” – 2:4/5, 168
      Krauss, Ruth. “Drunk Boat” – 2:4/5, 169
      Kryss, T.L. “Circus” – 2:4/5, 170
      Kryss, T.L. “The Withered Lemming of the River” – 2:4/5, 170
      Dowden, George. “Morning Song for My Girl by the Sea” – 2:4/5, 171
      Brown, Michael. “The Seventh Month” – 2:4/5, 172
      Kandel, Lenore. “Muir Beach Mythology / September” – 2:4/5, 173
      Perchik, Simon. “Four Photo-Poems” – 2:4/5, 174
      Shustak, Larence. untitled photography – 2:4/5, 175
      Knowles, Allison. “Journal of the Identical Lunch” – 2:4/5, 182
      Williams, Emmett. untitled [“North is this Way…”] – 2:4/5, 184
      Mac Low, Jackson. untitled [“Peace of Resembling…”] – 2:4/5, 186
      Johnson, Kay. “The Emerald City, For Gregory Corso” – 2:4/5, 188
      Cocteau, Jean. “Creation Before Life” – 2:4/5, 190
      Johnson, Ray. “Face Collage” – 2:4/5, 192
      Hansen, Al. “Gat” – 2:4/5, 193

8. Miller, Henry. INSOMNIA OR THE DEVIL AT LARGE
Albuquerque, Loujon Press, 1970
First edition, portfolio case with photo-illustrated sliding lid and housing 12 printed reproductions of Miller watercolors and a spiral bound book, 7 separate issues planned but far fewer were reportedly produced, published as Gypsy Lou Series #4.
(Shifreen & Jackson A175a-h)

  1. Variant Issues:
      1. Issue A: 12 copies, with 12 prints plus an original watercolor and book all signed by Miller (Shifreen & Jackson A175a)
      2. Issue B: 26 lettered copies, with 12 prints inscribed to the buyer and the book signed by Miller (Shifreen & Jackson A175b)
      3. Issue C: 192 copies [planned but likely that no more than 10 were published], with 12 prints and the book signed by Miller (Shifreen & Jackson A175c)
      4. Issue D: 192 copies [planned but likely that no more than 10 were published], with 9 of 12 prints and the book signed by Miller (Shifreen & Jackson A175d)
      5. Issue E: 192 copies [planned but likely that no more than 10 were published], with 6 of 12 prints and the book signed by Miller (Shifreen & Jackson A175e)
      6. Issue F: 192 copies [planned but likely that no more than 65 were published], with 3 of 12 prints and the book signed by Miller (Shifreen & Jackson A175f)
      7. Issue G: 192 copies [planned but later increased to 385], with 12 prints unsigned and the book signed by Miller (Shifreen & Jackson A175g)
      8. Economy Issue: 199 copies, with 12 prints and the book without the box (Shifreen & Jackson A175h)
  1. Ephemera:
      1. Publication announcement: 19” x 25” (Shifreen & Jackson B213)

Notes:
[1] Though not present in Robert Wilson’s Corso bibliography, this offprint has been examined.
[2] According to a Ken Lopez catalog entry, his copy of the Miller offprint is seven unbound leaves printed on both sides from volumes 1 and 2 of The Outsider and published in a set of 200 in 1963. However, Shifreen & Jackson describe the sets as 13 unbound leaves printed on rectos only.
[3] Listed in Michael McClure’s own online bibliography and confirmed by Denise Enck of Empty Mirror Books, though not present in any printed bibliography to date.
[4] First reference to the Burroughs offprints appear in Jon Edgar Webb: The Editor’s Bit and Obit by Nicky Drumbolis and are further discussed in Signatures, also by Nicky Drumbolis. Subsequent research turns up no extant copies and in later correspondence with Drumbolis, he adds, “In my Signatures study, I infer that the Burroughs piece ‘Operation Soft Machine/Cut’ may have been issued, based on layout; acknowledging further, that no copy had been recorded by Maynard and Miles.”
[5] While the existence of this offprint and another containing the full set of Miller letters from the first 3 issues of The Outsider are noted in Jon Edgar Webb: The Editor’s Bit and Obit, no evidence of these offprints has been identified.


References consulted

Dorbin, Sanford. A Bibliography of Charles Bukowski
Los Angeles: Black Sparrow Press, 1969

Drumbolis, Nicky. Jon Edgar Webb: The Editor’s Bit & Obit
Toronto: ECS, 1993

Drumbolis, Nicky. Signatures
Toronto: Letters, n.d.

Krumhansl, Aaron. A Descriptive Bibliography of The Primary Publications of Charles Bukowski
Santa Rosa: Black Sparrow Press, 1999

Maynard, Joe and Barry Miles. William S. Burroughs: A Bibliography, 1953-73
Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1978

Shifreen, Lawrence J. and Roger Jackson. Henry Miller: A Bibliography of Primary Sources
Ann Arbor: Roger Jackson, 1993

Wilson, Robert. A Bibliography of Works By Gregory Corso 1954-1965
New York: The Phoenix Bookshop, 1966

William S. Burroughs – Books, Pamphlets, and Broadsides

>> return to WILLIAM S. BURROUGHS main page >>

SECTION A:
This index includes books, pamphlets, and broadsides (excluding foreign language translations, interviews and some miscellaneous prose) from 1957 to 1973: roughly the period of time covered by the Maynard and Miles Bibliography (ref. M&M).


1. Lee, William. JUNKIE
a. First edition:
New York: Ace Books Inc., 1953
Perfect-bound in printed and illustrated wrappers, 4.25” x 6.5”, 320 pages, bound back to back with Maurice Helbrant’s Narcotic Agent. Publisher’s note by Carl Solomon (not credited).
(M&M A1a) *

William Burroughs’ first book, written under the pseudonym ‘William Lee’ (his mother’s maiden name).

According to Beatbooks catalog #92: Ace Books was owned by Carl Solomon’s uncle, A.A. Wyn, a connection made by Allen Ginsberg who was acting as Burroughs’s agent at the time. The publication of Nelson Algren’s novel The Man With The Golden Arm in 1949 inspired a trend for books about junkies, many of them mass-market paperbacks sold in newsagents rather than bookshops, and with commercial success in mind Wyn agreed to publish Burroughs. Though written in a noir-ish hard-boiled style, Junkie is autobiographical (the “Confessions of an Unredeemed Drug Addict”), and lacks the kind of plot that readers of the genre attracted by Al Rossi’s lurid cover art might have expected.

Burroughs’s picaresque and frequently humorous narrative, with its hip talk and junkie jargon, is also told from the detached point of view of the hipster-addict, a neutrality which Wyn sought to counter-balance by yoking it to a reprint of Helbrant’s 1941 account of his “War Against the Dope Menace”. Burroughs was initially appalled at this appendage, but his motivation for writing Junkie was, as he later wrote, money and recognition, though neither were forthcoming at first as the book was largely ignored at the time of publication. More significantly, by mixing an orthodox narrative of drug experiences with occasional forays into set-pieces, or routines, Junkie also paved the way for Naked Lunch.

b. First UK edition:
London: Digit Books, 1957
Perfect-bound in printed and illustrated wrappers, 4.5” x 7.25”, 160 pages.
(M&M A1b) *

According to Beatbooks catalog #92: First UK edition, and the first edition of Junkie as a separate item. Front cover art by Al Rossi, based on his earlier artwork for Ace Books. His sensational back cover art depicts a blonde with hypo and rolled-down stocking, and it was probably this, at least in part, that provoked the British censors to suppress the book after publication and order all the remaining copies to be pulped.

2. Burroughs, William. LETTER FROM A MASTER ADDICT TO DANGEROUS DRUGS
a. First edition:
Shrewsbury: British Journal of Addiction, 1957
Side-stapled sheets, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 13 pages,  50 copies.
(see M&M C1) *

An offprint of the Burroughs article appearing in the January 1957 issue of British Journal of Addiction (Vol. 53, No. 2) edited by John Yerbury Dent (M&M C1). This is Burroughs’ first appearance in print under his own name.

3. Burroughs, William S. THE NAKED LUNCH
a. First edition:
Paris: Olympia Press, July 1959
Sewn signatures bound in printed wrappers in printed and illustrated dust jacket, 4.5″ x 7″, 232 pages, 5000 copies. Dust jacket designed by Burroughs. Issued as No. 76 in the Traveller’s Companion Series. Preliminary issue with price on lower wrapper not canceled with over-stamp.
(M&M A2a)

According to Beatbooks catalog #89: Price on lower wrapper not canceled (copies distributed following the revaluation of the Franc in January 1960 had the printed price stamped over).

b. First US edition, revised:
New York City: Grove Press, 1962
Hardcover in paper and cloth-bound boards with gilt-stamped spine in printed and illustrated dust jacket, 5.5″ x 8″, 256 pages, 3500 copies. Printed prospectus issued.
(M&M A2b)

The contents of this edition differ from the Olympia first edition. This Grove Press edition includes as the Introduction, “Deposition: Testimony Concerning a Sickness” [first published in Evergreen Review, Vol. 4, No. 11 (January-February 1960) (M&M C12)] and, as the Appendix,“Letter from a Master Addict to Dangerous Drugs” [first published in The British Journal of Addiction, Vol. 53, No. 2 (January 1957) (M&M C1)].

4. Burroughs, William S. EXCERPT FROM PANTAPON ROSE
a. First edition:
San Francisco: Wallace Berman, 1959
Broadside, 4″ x 5″, letterpress printed by Wallace Berman.
(see M&M C11)

This broadside is laid into Semina, No. 4, edited by Wallace Berman (M&M C11).

5. Burroughs, William and Brion Gysin. THE EXTERMINATOR
a. First edition:
San Francisco: Auerhahn Press, 1960
Sewn signatures bound in printed and illustrated wrappers, 6.25″ x 9.25″, 64 pages, 1000 copies, letterpress printed, designed and printed by Dave L. Haselwood and James F. McIlroy. Illustrated by Brion Gysin. Printed announcement issued.
(M&M A4a)

The first collection of cut-ups, containing material that Burroughs and Gysin completed before Minutes To Go was published.

b. First edition, second printing:
San Francisco: Dave Haselwood Books, 1967
Sewn signatures bound in printed and illustrated wrappers, 6″ x 9″, 51 pages, 1000 copies. Illustrated by Brion Gysin.
(M&M A4b)

6. Burroughs, William, Sinclair Beiles, Gregory Corso, and Brion Gysin. MINUTES TO GO
a. First edition:
Paris: Two Cities Editions, April 1960
Sewn signatures bound in illustrated wrappers, 5.25″ x 8.25″, 64 pages, 1000 copies. Cover design by Brion Gysin.
(M&M A3a)

This is the second collection of cut-ups to be published.

b. First US edition:
San Francisco: Beach Books, Texts & Documents, 1968
Perfect-bound in printed and illustrated wrappers, 5.25″ x 8.5″, 66 pages, 1000 copies, distributed by City Lights Books.
(M&M A3b)

This edition is a facsimile of the first edition but for the addition of a Claude Pelieu collage.

7. Burroughs, William. THE SOFT MACHINE
a. First edition:
Paris: The Olympia Press, June 1961
Sewn signatures bound in printed wrappers in printed and illustrated dust jacket, 4.25″ x 7″, 184 pages, 5000 copies. Dust jacket designed by Brion Gysin.
(M&M A5a) *

b. First US edition, revised:
New York City: Grove Press, 1966
Hardcover in cloth-bound boards with silver-stamped spine in printed and illustrated dust jacket, 5.5″ x 8″, 184 pages, 18,000 copies. Cover art by Burroughs. Author photo by Charles Henri Ford.
(M&M A5b) *

According to Beat Books catalog #48: Burroughs completely rewrote the text for this edition, partly as a response to criticisms that the first edition had been difficult to read.

According to Am Here catalog #3: This constitutes the revised expanded edition advertised but never published by Olympia.

8. Burroughs, William. THE TICKET THAT EXPLODED
a. First edition:
Paris: Olympia Press, December 1962
Sewn signatures bound in printed wrappers in printed and photo-illustrated dust jacket, 4.25″ x 6.75″, 184 pages, 5000 copies. Dust jacket designed by Ian Sommerville. Illustrated by Brion Gysin.
(M&M A6a)

b. First US edition, revised:
New York City: Grove Press, June 1967
Hardcover in cloth-bound boards with black-stamped spine in printed and illustrated dust jacket, 5.25″ x 8″, 218 pages, 10,000 copies. Dust jacket designed by Kuhlman Associates. Author photo by Martha Rocher.
(M&M A6b) *

The Grove Press edition is a second version, a rearrangement of the first Olympia text with additions and expansions, plus “The Invisible Generation”, a piece incorporating two earlier articles from International Times (see M&M C157 and C162).

9. Burroughs, William. DEAD FINGERS TALK
a. First edition:
London: John Calder in association with Olympia Press, November 1963
Hardcover in cloth-bound boards with gilt-stamped spine in printed and illustrated dust jacket, 5.25″ x 8″, 220 pages, 4000 copies. Cover photos by Ian Sommerville.
(M&M A7a)

10. Burroughs, William. and Allen Ginsberg. THE YAGE LETTERS
a. First edition:
San Francisco: City Lights Books, November 1963
Sewn signatures bound in printed and photo-illustrated wrappers, 5″ x 7.25″, 68 pages, 3000 copies, letterpress printed at Villiers Publications.
(M&M A8a) *

According to Beatbooks catalog #89: An “early epistolary novel” by Burroughs, “detailing picaresque incidents of search for telepathic-hallucinogenic-mind-expanding drug Yage” (back cover blurb). The letters date from 1953 and record Burroughs’ journeys through the Amazon jungle. Includes two drawings by Allen Ginsberg and his letters to Burroughs from 1960.

11. Burroughs, William S. ROOSEVELT AFTER INAUGURATION
a. First edition:
New York: Fuck You Press, January 1964
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers, 4.25″ x 5.5″, 24 pages, 500 copies, mimeograph printed by Ed Sanders. Illustrated by Allen Ginsberg.
(M&M A9a)

According to Beatbooks catalog #89: The routine, created by Burroughs and Kells Elvins while students at Harvard and originally intended for inclusion in “The Yage Letters”, was censored by the English printers, and subsequently printed in Floating Bear No. 9 (M&M C33), resulting in its editor LeRoi Jones being jailed.

12. Burroughs, William. THE COLDSPRING NEWS
a. First edition:
Flint: Fenian Head Centre Press, March 1964
Broadside,7.25″ x 12.5″.
(see M&M C124)

This broadside also appears folded and bound into The Spero, Vol. 1, No. 1 edited by Douglas and Kathy Casement (Fenian Head Centre Press, 1965) with the addition of a copyright notice at the bottom. (M&M C124)

13. Burroughs, William S. PRY YOURSELF LOOSE AND LISTEN
a. First edition:
Tangier: Ira Cohen, Spring 1964
Saddle-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 5″ x 8″, 14 pages.
(see M&M C68-C71)

An offprint collecting all the Burroughs appearances in Gnaoua, No. 1, edited by Ira Cohen.

14. Burroughs, William S. NOVA EXPRESS
a. First edition:
New York City: Grove Press, November 1964
Hardcover in cloth-bound boards with black-stamped spine in printed and illustrated dust jacket, 5.5″ x 8.25″, 190 pages, 10,000 copies, printed at The Book Press. Foreword Note by Burroughs. Cover design by Roy Kuhlman. Author photograph by Martha Rocher.
(M&M A10a)

According to Burroughs’ Foreword Note: The section called “This Horrible Case” was written in collaboration with Mr. Ian Sommerville, a mathematician—Mr. Sommerville also contributed the technical notes in the section called “Chinese Laundry”—An extension of Brion Gysin’ cut-up method which I call the fold-in method has been used in this book which is consequently a composite of many writers living and dead.

15. Burroughs, William. VALENTINE’S DAY READING
a. First edition:
New York: American Theatre for Poets, February 1965
Side-stapled in printed cover sheet, 8.5″ x 11″, 14 pages, mimeograph printed.
(M&M F12)

Includes “Transcript of Dutch Schultz’s Last Words” and the first column from The Coldspring News, “On The Back Porch of his Farm”.

16. Burroughs, William. TIME
a. First edition:
New York: “C” Press, 1965
Saddle-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 32 pages, 1000 copies (886 in a trade edition; 100 numbered and signed; 10 lettered A-J, hardbound, with original manuscript page by Burroughs and original drawing by Gysin, signed; and four hardcover numbered copies hors commerce). Cover art by Burroughs. Illustrated by Brion Gysin. Edited by Ted Berrigan, Ron Padgett, and Joe Brainard.
(M&M A11a)

b. Pirate edition:
London: Urgency Press Rip-Off, May 1972
Top-stapled with printed cover sheet, 8″ x 13″, 32 pages, 45 copies. Edited by Roy Pennington. Published on the occasion of the Bickershaw Festival.
(M&M A11b)

17. Burroughs, William S. WILT CAUGHT IN TIME
a. First edition:
New Orleans: Loujon Press, c.1965
Broadside, 6″ x 9″, letterpress printed by Jon Edgar Webb and Gypsy Lou Webb.
(see M&M C46)

An offprint of the Burroughs contribution to The Outsider, No. 2, edited by Jon Edgar Webb and Gypsy Lou Webb (M&M C46).

According to Jeff Weddle in “The Loujon Press: An Historical Analysis”: Burroughs’ submission for issue two originally bore the title, “Cuts from ‘Word Line’ William Burroughs for Hassan i Sabbah.” The piece was done using Burroughs’ distinctive, jumbled, “cut-up” technique and had no easily discernible narrative flow or quickly grasped meaning. Perhaps for these reasons, Webb heavily edited and re-titled the piece, casting it as a poem in The Outsider number two. Burroughs’ manuscript bears a notation, again in Webb’s hand, stating that the piece was “condensed and rearranged into “wilt caught in time,” the title under which it appeared in the magazine. While Webb’s version of Burroughs’ piece bears little resemblance to the author’s original submission, no record has been uncovered showing Burroughs’ response to Webb’s heavy editing of his work.

18. Burroughs, William S. HEALTH BULLETIN: APO-33
a. First edition:
New York: Fuck You Press, 1965
Side-stapled sheets with printed and illustrated cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 54 pages, 10-20 copies, mimeograph printed by Ed Sanders.
(M&M A12a) *

According to Sanders “maybe as many as ten or twenty” copies were distributed before he halted publication due to Burroughs’ dissatisfaction with the copy he’d received.

b. Second edition:
San Francisco: Beach Books, Texts, & Documents, 1966
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 24 pages, 3000 copies.
(M&M A12b)

This printing is a photo-offset reproduction of Burroughs’ manuscript and scrapbook pages, featuring the three-column cut-up style, compiled by Mary Beach and Claude Pélieu.

19. Burroughs, William S. THE INVISIBLE GENERATION
a. First edition:
London: Project Sigma, December 1966
Broadside, 11.5″ x 17″, 1000 copies, offset printed.
(see M&M C159)

This item was not given a Sigma index number and no evidence exists to show distribution except by International Times itself which provided the offprints. Reprinted from International Times, No. 3 (November 1966) (M&M C157).

20. Burroughs, William S. THE INVISIBLE GENERATION (continued)
a. First edition:
London: Lovebooks Ltd, December 1966
Broadside, 22.5″ x 30.25″, 200 copies, silk-screened, designed by Michael English so that part of the card could be cut out and assembled to make a word-machine. Published as International Times, No. 5.5.
(see M&M C160) *

21. Burroughs, William S., Claude Pélieu, and Carl Weissner. SO WHO OWNS DEATH TV?
a. First edition:
San Francisco: Beach Books, Texts, & Documents, 1967
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 5.5″, 12 pages, 3000 copies; there was a variant issue of 200 copies on black paper printed in silver ink.
(M&M A13a)

b. Second edition, expanded:
San Francisco: Beach Books, Texts, & Documents, 1967
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 5.5″, 20 pages, 3000 copies. This expanded edition includes photo-collages by Jean-Jacques Lebel and Liam O’Gallagher.
(M&M A13b)

22. Burroughs, William S. SCIENTOLOGY REVISITED
a. First edition:
New York: Scientology East, c.1968
Saddle-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 8 pages.
(not in M&M) *

Reprinted from Mayfair, Vol. 3, No. 1 (January 1968) (M&M C187)

23. Burroughs, William S. THE DEAD STAR
a. First edition:
San Francisco: Nova Broadcast Press, November 1969
Broadside  (8″ x 26.75″), folded and stapled into printed wrappers, 4.74″ x 8″, 2000 copies. Edited by Jan Herman. Published as Nova Broadcast, No. 5
(M&M A14a)

24. Burroughs, William S. THE LAST WORDS OF DUTCH SCHULTZ
a. First edition:
London: Cape Goliard Press,  May 1970
Hardcover in cloth-bound boards with red-stamped spine in printed and illustrated dust jacket, 6.25″ x 9.75″, 88 pages. Cover art by R.B. Kitaj.
(M&M 17a) *

A film-script inspired by the official transcript of the last words of mobster Dutch Schultz, recorded by a police stenographer as he lay dying in hospital.

25. Burroughs, William S. ALI’S SMILE
a. First edition:
Brighton: Unicorn Books, October 1971
Hardcover in buckram-bound boards with gilt-stamped cover, 6.25″ x 8″, 44 pages, 99 copies numbered and signed, printed by Richard Moseley at Graphic Workshop. Issued in a carton which also contained a 12-inch LP record of Burroughs reading the second draft of the text.
(M&M A19a, G6) *

b. First edition, second printing:
Gottingen: Expanded Media Editions, October 1973
Perfect-bound in printed and illustrated wrappers, 5.75″ x 7.5″, 40 pages. Bilingual edition with German text translated by Carl Weissner. Photographs of the author by Udo Breger. Published as Expanded Media Editions, No. 12.
(M&M D28)

26. Burroughs, William S. THE WILD BOYS: A BOOK OF THE DEAD
a. First edition:
New York: Grove Press, 1971
Hardcover in cloth-bound boards with gilt-stamped spine and blind-stamped front cover in printed and illustrated dust jacket, 5.5″ x 8.25″, 184 pages.
(M&M A20a) *

27. Burroughs, William S. ELECTRONIC REVOLUTION 1970-71
a. First edition:
Cambridge: Blackmoor Head Press, October 1971
Perfect-bound in printed and illustrated wrappers, 8″ x 10.25″, 76 pages, 500 copies. Printed for Henri Chopin and his Collection OU by Ian Ormiston at the Blackmoor Head Press. Cover art by Brion Gysin. Text in English and French; French translation by Jean Chopin. Published as Collection OU, No. 2.
(M&M A21a)

28. Burroughs, William S., Brion Gysin, and Ian Sommerville. LET THE MICE IN, edited by Jan Herman
a. First edition:
West Glover, Vt.: Something Else Press, February 1973
Hardcover in cloth-bound boards with silver-stamped spine and front cover in printed dust jacket, 6.25″ x 9.25″, 74 pages, 500 copies (plus 1000 copies in wrappers), designed and printed by Graham Mackintosh at Noel Young Press in Santa Barbara.
(M&M A22a-b)

29. Burroughs, William S. EXTERMINATOR! A NOVEL
a. First edition:
New York: Viking Press, August 1973
Hardcover in cloth-bound boards with white-stamped spine and black-stamped front cover in printed and illustrated dust jacket, 5.25″ x 8″, 170 pages, 7500 copies.
(M&M A23a) *

Note: A collection of short routines and other material, mostly from The Wild Boys.

30. Burroughs, William S. WHITE SUBWAY
a. First edition:
London: Aloes Books, September 1973
Perfect-bound in printed and photo-illustrated wrappers, 6.25″ x 8.25″, 74 pages, 1000 copies (25 of which are numbered and signed).
(M&M A24a)

A collection of various pieces, its title taken from a section of The Soft Machine, including cut-up and three-column style texts (“Who Is the 3rd…?”, “The Last Post Danger Ahead”, and “From a Distant Hand Lifted”), originally published in little literary magazines such as Gnaoua, Spero, Underground Telegram, Kulchur, Arcade, Lines, Bulletin from Nothing, and Birmingham Bulletin. Also includes a piece by Alan Ansen, and Paul Bowles’s essay, “Burroughs In Tangier”.

31. Burroughs, William S. MAYFAIR ACADAMY SERIES MORE OR LESS, edited by Roy Pennington
a. First edition:
Brighton: Urgency Press Rip-Off, 1973
Saddle-stapled in printed and photo-illustrated wrappers, 5″ x 8.25″, 104 pages, 650 pages. Printed on different colour papers, stapled and trimmed at the press operated by Bill Butler’s partner, Mike Hughes, above the Unicorn bookshop in Brighton.
(M&M A25a)

Note: Reprints ten of the Burroughs ‘Academy Bulletins’ from Mayfair magazine, along with other articles he wrote for them, together with an essay on Burroughs “originally presented as an M.A. thesis in Philosophy” by the book’s publisher, Roy Pennington.

[* not in archive]

Pocket Poets Series

>> return to CITY LIGHTS main page >>

This index collects the books published as part of The Pocket Poets Series


1. Ferlinghetti, Lawrence. PICTURES OF THE GONE WORLD
a. First edition, regular copies:
San Francisco: City Lights Pocket Bookshop, November 1955
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers with printed wrap-around label tipped on, 5″ x 6″, 44 pages, 500 copies, letterpress printed by David Ruff. Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 1.
(Cook 1)

b. First edition, hardcover copies:
San Francisco: City Lights Pocket Bookshop, 1955
Hardcover in cloth-bound boards with printed label tipped on, 5.25″ x 6.25″, 44 pages, 25 copies, letterpress printed by David Ruff, bound by the Cardoza bindery. Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 1.
(Cook 1)

Note: from the rear cover: “Pictures of the Gone World is the first volume in the Pocket Poets Series, in which it is planned to make available, in inexpensive form, work by such well known poets as e.e. cummings, Kenneth Patchen, Kenneth Rexroth, and William Carlos Williams, as well as poetry by younger less known writers who are also doing significant work in the modern idiom, whether it be ‘in the American grain’ or against it.”

2. Rexroth, Kenneth (translator). THIRTY SPANISH POEMS OF LOVE AND EXILE
a. First edition, regular copies:
San Francisco: City Lights Pocket Bookshop, 1956
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers with printed wrap-around label tipped on, 4.75″ x 6″, 40 pages, 950 copies, letterpress printed. Designed by Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Published as The Pocket Poets Series,  No 2.
(Cook 2)

b. First edition, hardcover copies:
San Francisco: City Lights Pocket Bookshop, 1956
Hardcover in cloth-bound boards with printed label tipped on, 5″ x 6.25″, 40 pages, 50 numbered and signed copies, letterpress printed. Designed by Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Published as The Pocket Poets Series,  No 2.
(Cook 2)

3. Patchen, Kenneth. POEMS OF HUMOR & PROTEST
a. First edition, regular copies:
San Francisco: City Lights Pocket Bookshop, July 1956
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers with printed wrap-around label tipped on, 5″ x 6″, 48 pages, 1000 copies, letterpress printed by Villiers Publications in London. Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 3
(Cook 3)

b. First edition, hardcover copies:
San Francisco: City Lights Pocket Bookshop, 1956
Hardcover in cloth-bound boards with printed label tipped on, 5.25″ x 6.25″, 48 pages, 25 copies, letterpress printed by Villiers Publications in London, bound by the Cardoza Bindery. Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 3
(Cook 3)

Note: this collection gathers 32 short poems from seven of Patchen’s earlier books, published during the 1940s and early 1950s.

4. Ginsberg, Allen. HOWL AND OTHER POEMS
First edition:
San Francisco: City Lights Pocket Bookshop, October 1956
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers with printed wrap-around label tipped on, 5″ x 6″, 44 pages, 1000 copies, letterpress printed at Villiers Publications in London. Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 4
(Cook 4)

Note: The first printing lists Lucien Carr’s name on the dedication page. Later printings do not list his name, removed at his request. The hand-pasted wraparound paper label is only present on the first and second printings.

Ginsberg first read part of the poem at the Six Gallery reading on October 7, 1955. The second printing of Howl and Other Poems was seized by the U.S. Customs Office and shortly afterwards Ferlinghetti and Shigeyoshi Murao, manager of City Lights Bookshop, were arrested for selling and publishing obscene literature. Defended by the ACLU, the case was highly publicized and covered by established publications such as Time and Life, adding to the attention of this small press and Howl. Judge Clayton Horn found the book to be not obscene and this landmark decision helped launch City Lights and Ginsberg’s poems into the public arena.

5. Ponsot, Marie. TRUE MINDS
First edition:
San Francisco: City Lights Pocket Bookshop, January 1957
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers with printed wrap-around label tipped on, 5″ x 6″, 32 pages, 500 copies, letterpress printed at Villiers Publications in London. Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 5
(Cook 5)

Note: the title of this collection of love poems was taken from Shakespeare’s 116th Sonnet. It would be 24 years later when she would publish her second volume of poems and borrow the title from the next line of the sonnet: “Avoid Impediment”.

6. Levertov, Denise. HERE AND NOW
First edition:
San Francisco: City Lights Pocket Bookshop, January 1957
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers with printed wrap-around label tipped on, 5″ x 6″, 32 pages, 500 copies, letterpress printed at Villiers Publications in London. Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 6
(Cook 6)

7. Williams, William Carlos. KORA IN HELL: IMPROVISATIONS
First edition:
San Francisco: City Lights Books, August 1957
Sewn and bound in printed wrappers, 5″ x 6.25″, 84 pages, 1500 copies, letterpress printed at Villiers Publications in London. Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 7
(Cook 7)

Note: from the rear cover: “William Carlos Williams, at 74, has some claim to be called Poet Laureate of America, being the author of almost forty books, and having won most of the important poetry awards in this country. He is a man known for his enthusiasms, a constant defender of poets and poetry.”

8. Corso, Gregory. GASOLINE
First edition:
San Francisco: City Lights Books, February 1958
Perfect-bound in printed wrappers, 5″ x 6.25″, 48 pages, 1500 copies, letterpress printed by the Pinchpenny Press in Berkeley. Introduction by Allen Ginsberg. Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 8
(Cook 8)

9. Prévert, Jacques. SELECTIONS FROM PAROLES
First edition:
San Francisco: City Lights Books, July 1958
Sewn and bound in printed wrappers, 5″ x 6.5″, 72 pages, 1500 copies, letterpress printed at Villiers Publications in London. Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 9
(Cook 10)

Note: from the rear cover: “In the years immediately following World War II, Jacques Prévert spoke more directly to and for the French who had come of age under the Occupation than any other contemporary poet, if enormous success of Paroles is any indication. First published in 1946, it was almost immediately reprinted, and by 1952 there were 200,000 copies in print.”

10. Duncan, Robert. SELECTED POEMS
First edition:
San Francisco: City Lights Books, January 1959
Saddle-stapled in printed wrappers, 5″ x 6.25″, 80 pages, 1500 copies, letterpress printed at Villiers Publications in London. Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 10
(Cook 14)

Note: Selected Poems gathers poems written between 1942 and 1950. From the publisher’s statement: “In making this selection from his first four books, together with certain other poems of the same period, Duncan feels he has given his work as a whole a focus that amounts to a new definition of his poetic intent.”

11. Rothenberg, Jerome (translator). NEW YOUNG GERMAN POETS
First edition:
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1959
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 11
(Cook 16)

Note: This collection, edited and translated by Jerome Rothenberg, introduces ten German poets who were born between the First World War and the first years of the Nazi rise to power. The collection includes the first English appearances of Paul Celan, Ingeborg Bachmann and Gunter Grass.

12. Parra, Nicanor. ANTI-POEMS
First edition:
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1960
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 12

Note: These poems are taken from Parra’s Poemas y Antipoemas originally published in 1954. This is the first appearance in English, translated by painter and critic Jorge Elliott.

13. Patchen, Kenneth. THE LOVE POEMS OF KENNETH PATCHEN
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1961
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 13





14. Ginsberg, Allen. KADDISH AND OTHER POEMS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1961
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 14

Note: This is the long anticipated volume of poems following the highly successful Howl and Other Poems. It presents the long title poem on the death of his mother and fifteen other poems. Kaddish is the name of the Hebrew prayer for the dead.

15. Nichols, Robert. SLOW NEWSREEL OF MAN RIDING TRAIN
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1962
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 15

16. Hollo, Anselm (translator). RED CATS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1962
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 16

Note: In his introduction Hollo writes, “In the middle 50’s a number of Soviet writers started what became known as ‘The Thaw’: a movement towards freedom and personal literary and critical expression…” Yevgeni Yevtushenko and Andrei Voznesensky were in their twenties at the time Red Cats was published.

17. Lowry, Malcolm. SELECTED POEMS OF MALCOLM LOWRY
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1962
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 17

Note: from the back cover: “This is the first comprehensive collection of Lowry’s poetry, including most of those strange Mexican verses closely related to his novel, Under the Volcano.
Edited by Lowry’s good friend, Earle Birney, with the assistance of the author’s widow, this book brings into perspective the many poems from various periods which have appeared in magazines, as well as others never before published.”

18. Ginsberg, Allen. REALITY SANDWICHES, 1953-1960
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1963
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 18

Note: Reality Sandwiches collects poems written by Ginsberg between 1953 and 1960, thus presenting his early work prior to his groundbreaking poem Howl in 1956

19. O’Hara, Frank. LUNCH POEMS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1964
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 19

20. Lamantia, Philip. SELECTED POEMS, 1943-1966
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1967
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 20

Note: this volume collects poems of his youth, travels and time in San Francisco: Revelations of a Surreal Youth (1943-1945), Trance Ports (1948-1961), and Secret Freedom (1963-1966).

21. Kaufman, Bob. GOLDEN SARDINE
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1967
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 21

22. Pommy-Vega, Janine. POEMS TO FERNANDO
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1968
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 22

23. Ginsberg, Allen. PLANET NEWS, 1961-1967
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1968
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 23

24. Upton, Charles. PANIC GRASS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1968
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 24

25. Picasso, Pablo. HUNK OF SKIN
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1968
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 25

26. Bly, Robert. THE TEETH-MOTHER NAKED AT LAST
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1970
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 26

27. di Prima, Diane. REVOLUTIONARY LETTERS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1971
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 27

Note: Revolutionary Letters was published in a number of earlier versions by underground presses. The first City Lights edition collects letters 1-43 and other poems. Later printings include additional letters.

28. Kerouac, Jack. SCATTERED POEMS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1971
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 28

Note: Scattered Poems is a collection of poems published posthumously and compiled by Ann Charters, one of Kerouac’s earliest biographers. The poems included were written as early as 1945. The cover is a reproduction of a photograph of Kerouac
taken by William S. Burroughs in Tangier in 1957.

29. Voznesensky, Andri. DOGALYPSE: SAN FRANCISCO POETRY READING
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1972
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 29

30. Ginsberg, Allen. THE FALL OF AMERICA: POEMS OF THESE STATES, 1965-1971
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1972
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 30

Note: this collection continues Ginsberg’s chronicle of travels across America. He dedicates the volume to Whitman and includes on the dedication page a long quote from Whitman’s Democratic Vistas,
1871. Barry Miles, Ginsberg’s biographer, relates that Ginsberg was living near Kenneth Patchen on Telegraph Hill. Patchen introduced Ginsberg to the Dos Passos translation of Blaise Cendrars’ Trans-Siberian Voyage, which served as a model for Ginsberg’s travelogue-style work, The Fall of America.

31. Winslow, Pete. A DAISY IN THE MEMORY OF A SHARK
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1973
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 31

32. Norse, Harold. HOTEL NIRVANA
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1974
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 32

33. Waldman, Anne. FAST SPEAKING WOMAN
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1975
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 33

34. Hirschman, Jack. LYRIPOL
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1976
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 34

35. Ginsberg, Allen. MIND BREATHS: POEMS 1972-1977
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1977
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 35

Note: This collection presents poems written by Ginsberg from 1972 to 1977. Ginsberg dedicated this volume to Chögyum Trungpa, the poet and philosopher who named Ginsberg the “Lion of Dharma” in 1972.

36. Brecht, Stefan. POEMS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1978
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 36

Note: A collection of poems by the son of German playwright and poet Bertolt Brecht . It was privately published two years earlier by the poet. The cover photograph is by Arthur Tress.

37. Orlovsky, Peter. CLEAN ASSHOLE POEMS & SMILING VEGETABLE SONGS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1978
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 37

38. Antler [Brad Burdick]. FACTORY
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1980
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 38

39. Lamantia, Philip. BECOMING VISIBLE
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1981
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 39

40. Ginsberg, Allen. PLUTONIAN ODE: POEMS 1977-1980
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1982
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 40

41. Pasolini, Pier Paolo. ROMAN POEMS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1986
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 41

42. NINE DUTCH POETS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1982
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 42

43. Cardenal, Ernesto. FROM NICARAGUA WITH LOVE
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1986
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 43

44. Porta, Antonio. KISSES FROM ANOTHER DREAM
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1987
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 44

45. Cornford, Adam. ANIMATIONS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1988
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 45

46. LaLoca [Pamala Karol]. ADVENTURES ON THE ISLE OF ADOLESCENCE
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1989
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 46

47. Mayakovsky, Vladimir. LISTEN
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1991
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 47

48. Kerouac, Jack. POEMS ALL SIZES
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1992
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 48

49. Zamora, Daisy. RIVERBED OF MEMORY
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1992
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 49

50. Murillo, Rosario. ANGEL IN THE DELUGE
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1993
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 50

51. Kerouac, Jack. SCRIPTURES OF THE GOLDEN ETERNITY
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1994
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 51

52. Blanco, Alberto. DAWN OF THE SENSES
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1995
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 52

53. Cortázar, Julio. SAVE TWILIGHT
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1997
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 53

54. Campana, Dino. ORPHIC SONGS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1998
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 54

55. Hirschman, Jack. FRONT LINES
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 2002
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 55

56. Mehmedinovic, Semezdin. NINE ALEXANDRIAS
San Francisco: City Lights Books, 2003
Published as The Pocket Poets Series, No. 56

Matrix Press

>> return to PIERO HELICZER main page >>

[note: this Booktryst essay has been excerpted  for clarity of topic.]

A Checklist of Matrix Press (London 1961-4)
by Alastair Johnston

Tom Raworth started Matrix Press in 1961. His first book was a tiny edition of poems by Pete Brown. He then issued three numbers of a magazine called Outburst. One, in collaboration with the Finnish poet Anselm Hollo and the American Gregory Corso was Outburst: The Minicab War, a humorous salvo in the class war.  Outburst became part of a network of avant-garde writers and aired the trans-Atlantic voices of Creeley, Dorn, Levertov, Fee Dawson, and Olson for the first time in Britain.

In an interview with Andy Spragg, Raworth explained his reason for starting his own press:

TR: I was following threads of people I liked in the Allen anthology [The New American Poetry, edited by Don Allen, Grove Press, 1960]… Dorn, O’Hara, Creeley, Ginsberg and so on… hard to do then in London (though Better Books and Zwemmers in Charing Cross Road were occasional sources) and I got used to having to write to the US for books. It crossed my mind that if I liked this stuff there might be a few others who would too. Around then, late 1959 early 1960, my father-in-law gave us a delayed wedding present of £100. I can’t remember how I’d got interested in letterpress printing: it might be genetic… years later I discovered my father had wanted to be a printer, and that an ancestor, Ruth Raworth, had printed one of Milton’s early books in the 17th C. Anyway, I got a small Adana press ?rst and then a larger treadle press. Offset printing was slowly taking over and letterpress equipment and type was not too expensive then. By late 1960/early 1961 I was in correspondence with Dorn, Creeley and others in the US and had met Anselm Hollo, Michael Horovitz, Pete Brown and others here. I printed the ?rst small booklet (a couple of tiny poems by Pete Brown) on the Adana. I was working then in the Euston Road, at Burroughs Wellcome, the manufacturing pharmacists, and a photographer friend there, Steve Fletcher, had a brother who was an engraver and shared a workshop just off Oxford Street with a letterpress printer. They let me move the treadle press there so they could use it for small jobs and in return I could have access whenever I wanted. I’d met, and become good friends with, David Ball and Piero Heliczer (also a letterpress printer with his Dead Language in Paris). So I did small books of Dorn, Ball and Heliczer. And two and a half issues of the magazine Outburst. I had to set two pages at a time (only enough type for that) on the ?oor at night after work, carry it into town the next day, print the pages on the press with whatever colour ink was in use, go home, sort the type back into the case and start again.

PUBLICATIONS

1. Brown, Pete. SAMPLE PACK
London: Matrix Press, 1961

According to Raworth, about 6 copies were printed. The poems were collected in Let Em Roll Kafka, Brown’s book from Fulcrum Press (London, 1969). Best-known today as the lyricist for the rock band Cream, Pete Brown was Britain’s first performance poet who earned his living giving readings. He was the first reader at the Morden Tower in Newcastle, one of the most important poetry venues in England in the 60s.

“When John Lennon was still in art college Pete was turning on Liverpool with his synthesis of Beat poetry, Bop jazz, and British humour.” — Stuart Montgomery

2. OUTBURST, No. 1, edited by Tom Raworth
London: Matrix Press, 1961

Handset by Raworth in Gill Sans, Perpetua, Times Bold, Ultra Bodoni. Printed by Richard Moore and Sons. Cover photo (& 2 more inside) by Steve Fletcher.

Contributors include Anselm Hollo, Tram Combs, Robert Creeley, Fielding Dawson, Denise Levertov, Ed Dorn, Christopher Logue, Gary Snyder, Charles Olson, Michael Horovitz, Piero Heliczer, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Pete Brown, Gregory Corso, and others.

The advertisements for other little magazines, like Migrant, Yugen and New Departures, show how closely networked the avant-garde was in the 1960s. Gael Turnbull (1928-2004) was a key figure in the literary small press movement. A Scottish doctor he started Migrant Press in 1957 and continued operating it (with a mimeograph machine) after he moved to Ventura, California. He published many of the same poets as Raworth, including Dorn, Hollo and Ian Hamilton Finlay, whose The Dancers Inherit the Party is reviewed in this issue of Outburst.

3. OUTBURST: THE MINICAB WAR
London: Matrix Press, 1961

White or blue wrappers, each page in a different color of ink. Cover photo by Steve Fletcher.

According to Raworth: “This issue was done with the hope that it might give a benevolent lift to the satirists of the Establishment, who want very much to destroy a possibly REAL revolution by making entertainment of it, and England’s future darker — The Minicab War is the Synthesis of Class War.”

Note: In June 1961 Michael Gotla of Welbeck launched a fleet of 400 minicabs on the streets of London, that carried advertising and undercut the well-established black cabs. Soon things turned nasty with hundreds of bogus phone calls to the minicab companies ordering cabs, black taxis hemming in the smaller vehicles, even vandalism as the situation escalated. In an editorial in August, under the headline “What the Public Wants,” The Times wrote: “It is fairly obvious that for many people in London finding a taxi has become too chancy and paying for it too stiff.” Minicab War contains spurious interviews with T. S. Eliot, John Betjeman, (Prime Minister) Harold MacMillan, George Barker, Bertrand Russell, Martin Bormann, & various cabbies. The perpetrators were Tom Raworth (O’Moore), Gregory Corso (De la Rue) & Anselm Hollo (Sykes). Martin Bormann was Hitler’s personal secretary. It was believed he had escaped Germany after the War and fled to South America so he remained alive in British popular culture, resurfacing on the beach in Brazil with Great Train Robber Ronnie Biggs in the Sex Pistols’ movie The Great Rock ‘n’ Roll Swindle (dir: Julian Temple, 1980).

4. OUTBURST, No. 2 , edited by Tom Raworth
London: Matrix Press, 1963

Some pages printed in colored ink.

Contributors include Douglas Woolf, Paul Blackburn, Leroi Jones, Fielding Dawson, Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, Larry Eigner, Ruth Weiss, Ed Dorn, David Meltzer, Alan Sillitoe, Carol Bergé, Piero Heliczer, Paul Klee (translated by Anselm Hollo), Pentti Saarikoski (translated by Anselm Hollo), Philip Whalen, and others.

5. Heliczer, Piero. & I DREAMT I SHOT ARROWS IN MY AMAZON BRA
Brighton: Dead Language & London: Matrix Press

Cover photo by Ph Mechanicus; the image is reused from the last page of Outburst, No. 2.

According to Raworth:  “Piero was living with us; he and I printed in on my treadle press which was off Oxford Street in Richard Moore’s print-shop…”

According to Alastair Johnston: “Ambitious design using the gutter as a focal point. Each page has a black bar printed in the gutter which then continues across the fold. Large condensed Gill Sans headers make striking compositions. The text is in Perpetua with Times Bold. One leaf is printed on lavender paper.”

6. Hollo, Anselm. HISTORY
London: Matrix Press, 1963

Set in Linotype Times, printed on Brookleigh Bond wove paper; price 3 shillings.

Colophon: This book has been set in Times Roman type. The two drawings are by Ken Lansdowne. Nelson is by Gregory Corso. A photograph of the cover illustration was supplied by Steve Fletcher. All blocks were made by Barry Hall. 350 copies were printed. Designed and printed by Tom Raworth

AJ: History by Anselm seems like the transitional book from matrix to goliard, since barry made the blocks. i guess you met him at this point and decided to collaborate from then on? it looks like a really light impression, or else some of it is offset, and it says typeset and printed by you, so what press were you using?

TR:  It was done on my treadle press, the Adana, smaller than the later Goliard press one, which was stored at the print shop of Richard Moore, three floors up off Oxford Street where the deal was that he could use it for small jobs (his main press was a large Heidelberg). That came about because one of the other two craftsmen in the shop, the engraver (there was also a diestamper and process engraver) was the brother of my friend Steve Fletcher a photographer, who took the photo on the front of the second issue of Outburst.

7. Dorn, Edward. FROM GLOUCESTER OUT
London: Matrix Press, March 1964

Drawing by Barry Hall

From the Colophon: This book is set in Times Roman. There are 350 copies Designed and printed by Tom Raworth, Flat 3, Stanley House, Finchley Rd, London NW11 20.3.64

According to Johnston: Dorn visited England to teach at the University of Essex. He and Raworth became lifelong friends and collaborated later at Zephyrus Image, when both were living in San Francisco in the mid to late 70s.

8. Ball, David.TWO POEMS
London: Matrix Press, August 1964

Drawing by Gene Mahon. This book is set in Baskerville and Times Roman (cover title in Verona).

Bardo Matrix – Books

>> return to BARDO MATRIX main page >>

SECTION A:
This index includes books, chapbooks, and booklets of poetry and prose


1. Maclise, Angus. THE CLOUD DOCTRINE
First edition:
Kathmandu: Dreamweapon Press, 1974
Saddle-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 7.5″ x 10.75″, 16 pages, letterpress printed on handmade paper. Cover woodblock print from a photograph by Ira Cohen.

Note: The Cloud Doctrine was one of the first books produced by the Kathmandu beat poetry presses, and set the template for the books issued in this style.

2. Corso, Gregory. WAY OUT: A POEM IN DISCORD
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix, 1974
Machine-sewn in printed and illustrated wrappers, 8.5″ x 10.75″, 22 pages, 500 numbered copies, letterpress printed on handmade paper by Sharada Printing Press. Published as Starstreams Poetry Series No. 1.

Note: Slip laid-in listing the cast for the first, and only, performance of this poem/play in Kathmandu, Nepal. The cast members included Ira Cohen and Angus MacLise

3. Ford, Charles Henri. 7 POEMS
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix, 1974
Side-stapled in printed and photo-illustrated wrappers, 500 numbered copies, printed by Sharada Printing Press. Cover photo of Ford by Ira Cohen. Published as Starstreams Poetry Series No. 3.

Note: This is the third book in the Starstreams series but Ira Cohen gives it a 1974 publishing date in his publication list which would have it appearing before  Cohen’s 7 Marvels, published as number two in the series.

4. Cohen, Ira. POEM FOR LA MALINCHE *
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix/Bureau of Surrealist Research, c.1974
Undboud sheets laid into printed wrappers, 500 copies. Cover art by Dana Young (uncredited).


5. Cohen, Ira. 7 MARVELS
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix, 1975
Unbound in printed and illustrated wrappers, 9″ x 11″, 15 leaves of various dimensions, 500 numbered copies, letterpress printed at Sharada Printing Press. Woodblocks hand printed by Nawang Norbu cut by Tibetan craftsmen after Marvel Comix. Colophon illustration designed by John Chick. Published as Starstreams Poetry Series Number 2.

Contents: [untitled] “O Surfer Surfing & Surfed…”, [untitled] “Forests of eyelids…”, “for Geoffrey Humphreys”, “For Frank Herbert & The Bene Tleilaxu Face Dancers”, “Silver Shoetrees in Hermes’ Closet”, [untitled] “1. I have with me the perception…”, [untitled] “The earth-stealers have arrived!”

6. Maclise, Angus. THE SUBLIMINAL REPORT
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix, 1975
Machine-sewn in printed and illustrated wrappers, 8.5″ x 10.75″, 28 pages, 500 numbered copies, letterpress printed on handmade paper. Cover woodblock print from a photograph by Ira Cohen. Published as Starstreams Poetry Series, No. 4

According to Ira Cohen: “The Subliminal Report included two photos printed in silver ink on white machine made paper, one a mylar portrait of Angus taken in New York, the other a stone garuda sinking into the ground in Dhoka Tole just in front of the Raj Photo Shop where the negatives were developed and first printed…There was a very special collaboration going on here between the artists and artisans, Nepalis and foreigners, which was mutually inspiring and gives the books their unique quality. The Subliminal Report was the first book to utilize Bhutanese silk paper as cover stock.”

7. Bowles, Paul. NEXT TO NOTHING
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix, 1976
Machine-sewn in printed and illustrated wrappers, 7.25″ x 9.5″, 24 pages, 500 numbered copies, letterpress printed at Sharada Printing Press. Cover verifax by Maya, frontispiece collage by Dana Young, title page illustration by Sidney Hushour, illustration by Petra Vogt, colophon illustration by Lee Baarslag, back cover image supplied by Bowles. Published as Starstreams 5.

8. Cohen, Ira. POEMS FROM THE COSMIC CRYPT *
First edition:
Kathmandu: Kali Press/Bardo Matrix, 1976
Hardcover in paper-bound boards with paper title label, 7.5″ x 9.75″, 90 pages, 500 copies, illustrated by Petra Vogt, introduction by Angus MacLise.

9. Cohen, Ira. OPIUM ELEMENTALS
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix, 1976
Machine-sewn in printed and illustrated wrappers, 12″ x 9.25″, 50 pages, 350 numbered and signed copies, letterpress printed at Sharada Printing Press. Designed and illustrated by Dana Young. Published as A Starstreams Special Edition.

Contents: “Emergent Waxwork” [poem], “The Mirage Poem” [poem]

10. di Prima, Diane. LOBA PART II
First edition:
Pt. Reyes and Kathmandu: Eidolon Editions, 1976
Saddle-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 7.5″ x 10.25″, 36 pages, 550 copies (50 hardbound), letterpress printed on handmade paper. Illustrated by Josie Grant.

From the colophon: printed for Eidolon Editions by Dreamweapon in the Kingdom of Nepal, being the 24th printing of the Independent Presses of Kathmandu…

11. Valenza, Roberto Francisco. THE CLEARING STAGE
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix, 1976
500 copies.




12. Falk, Jane. CKROWWW
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix, 1976
500 copies. Published as Starstreams Poetry Series No. 6.



13. Sagaray [pseud. Jane Falk]. THE WITCH SPEAKS
First edition:
Kathmandu: Snake Tongue, 1976
Machine-sewn in printed and illustrated wrappers, 7″ x 8.25″, 36 pages, 230 numbered copies, letterpress printed on handmade paper by Sharada Printing Press. Cover art by Chandra Man Maskay. Illustrated by author.

14. Gaynor, Iris M. EXITS
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix, 1977
Machine-sewn in printed and illustrated wrappers, 5.5″ x 10.75″, 14 pages, 200 numbered copies, letterpress printed on handmade paper by Sharada Printing Press. Cover art by Lee Baarslag. Published as a Starstreams Special Edition.

15. Cohen, Ira. GILDED SPLINTERS
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix, 1977
500 copies.

Note: cover illustration by Jimmy Thapa


16. Valenza, Roberto Francisco. LOST CONTACT
First edition:
Kathmandu: Bardo Matrix, 1977
250 copies.




[*not in archive]

Bardo Matrix

The Bardo Matrix Press was founded in Kathmandu in the early 1970s by original Velvet Underground drummer, artist, and poet Angus MacLise and poet, photographer, and publisher Ira Cohen as a publishing outgrowth of the Colorado artists’ collective of the same name. MacLise and Cohen commenced to issue pamphlets, booklets, posters, books, and broadsides by not only themselves and their fellow travellers, but also by some of the most important names of post-war literature: Paul Bowles, Gregory Corso, Diane Di Prima, and Charles Henri Ford were among the chosen.

The publications were printed in editions of anywhere from a couple of dozen to a few hundred, usually utilizing fine printing techniques such as wood blocks, letterpress, special inks, and handmade paper. But this was not based on traditional thoughts on fine printing, but rather on the opportunity to create something cheap and beautiful. There was a built-in audience for these publications on “Freak Street” in Kathmandu, where people in the circle of Bardo Matrix operated a small bookshop which did decent business selling wood-block printed headshop posters alongside poetry broadsides, these publications, as well as second-hand English language paperback books.

After the 1979 death of Angus MacLise, the activity of the Bardo Matrix Press quietly faded out. Ira Cohen returned to New York City where he was a highly visible member of the poetic demimonde until his passing in 2011, shortly after he had helped stage an exhibition on the life and work of Angus MacLise.


Bardo Matrix Checklist:

Section A: Books
Section B: Broadsides
Section C: Spirit Catcher Bookshop

· John Chick


Online Resources:

· The Bardo Matrix

· Big Bridge – Ira Cohen: The Great Rice Paper Adventure

· Granary Books – Bardo Matrix Collection

· University of Delaware – Bardo Matrix Press

Piero Heliczer – Publications Edited, Printed, and Published

>> return to PIERO HELICZER main page >>

SECTION E:
This index includes publications edited printed, and published by Piero Heliczer and his Dead Language Press


1. Piero Heliczer and Angus MacLise. IMPRIMATUR M.CC.LXXX.I and THE COMPLETED WORKS OF ANGUS MACLISE
First edition:
White Plains: privately printed, 1957
Hand-sewn in printed and illustrated wrappers, 24 pages, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer.



2. Om [pseud. Olivia de Haulleville]. MARIA
a. First edition, blue paper:
Paris: Dead Language Press, 1958
Broadside, 6.75″ x 15″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer. Contents: “Maria” [poem]
[not in archive]


b. First edition, white paper:
Paris: Dead Language Press, 1958
Broadside, 5″ x 6.5″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer. Contents: “Maria” [poem]


According to BeatBooks catalog #86, poem written partly in English and partly in French, probably composed in memory of the author’s maternal aunt, and wife of Aldous Huxley, Maria Nys, who died in 1955.

3. Om [pseud. Olivia de Haulleville]. LEMURS
First edition:
Paris: The Dead Language, 1958
Unbound sheets laid into printed and photo-illustrated wrappers, 11″ x 9″, 6 pages, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer.

Note: This is the first separate edition of one of three pieces collected in A Pulp Magazine for the Dead Generation.

[scans of this item at Mimeo Mimeo]

4. [anthology] A PULP MAGAZINE FOR THE DEAD GENERATION, edited by Piero Heliczer
ph_pulp
a. First edition, green cover:
Paris: The Dead Language Press, 1959
Three un-boud folded sheets laid into printed wrappers, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer. Photograph of Om tipped in; this photograph is different in pose, format, and printing method than the one featured in the blue-covered issue. Contributors: Om [pseud. Olivia de Haulleville], Henk Marsman [aka J. Bernlef], Gregory Corso.

b. First edition, blue cover:
Paris: The Dead Language Press, 1959
Three un-boud folded sheets laid into printed wrappers, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer. Photograph of Om affixed to last leaf, as issued; this photograph is different in pose, format, and printing method than the one featured in the green-covered issue. Contributors: Om [pseud. Olivia de Haulleville], Henk Marsman [aka J. Bernlef], Gregory Corso.

According to BeatBooks catalog #86, the book prints “Lemurs” by Om [pseud. Olivia de Haulleville]; five poems by Henk Marsman (the Dutch poet, Hendrik Jan Marsman, aka J. Bernlef); and four poems from The Vestal Lady on Brattle and Other Poems by Gregory Corso. Each contribution is preceded by a brief text, Corso’s probably written by Piero Heliczer, the others by the poets themselves.

5. THE DEAD LANGUAGE DIXHUIT RUE DESCARTES PARIS
ph_dl1
First edition:
Paris: Dead Language, (c. 1959)
Flyer, 4.5″ x 8.25″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer.

Note: verso lists Dead Language publications, 1957-1959.

6. PURCELL FESTIVAL M.CM.L.IX
First edition:
Paris: The Dead Language, 1959
Flyer, 4.5″ x 8.25″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer.

Note: announces a festival “to be held in paris the second week of july to celebrate henry purcells three hundredth birthday…organised by the dead language”. Text in English and French.

According to BeatBooks catalog #86, The festival was organised by Piero Heliczer, a keen listener of English baroque, William Byrd as well as Purcell. When he visited Cambridge in early February 1960 as part of Michael Horovitz’s Live New Departures, Heliczer was presented with a viola da gamba by the musicologist and Purcell exponent, Thurston Dart, an instrument that Horovitz remembers Heliczer soon mastered.

Earlier, in June 1959, a petit scandale emerged when Peter Forbes, a British tabloid journalist, visited Heliczer in Paris after hearing of his invitations to English school girls to attend the festival, one of them sent to the headmistress of Queen Anne’s School in Caversham. Forbes’s article appeared in the Sunday Pictorial on June 7 and featured a photograph of Heliczer with Olivia de Haulleville (“A Bohemian young scamp and his girl friend”).

It claimed that Heliczer was offering “to receive groups of girls at a festival in Paris… The girls would pay their own fares, but Heliczer would provide free hotel accomodation.” Forbes added that Heliczer hoped “to get one of his girl guests to act in a play he has written. It features a headless man and a girl who appears naked standing on a tombstone”, and quotes the headmistress as initially having been “quite enthusiastic. Some of the girls had obtained their parents’ consent and were looking forward to the trip. Now, however, we shall unquestionably withdraw. I shall write to Heliczer telling him so.” The article concludes: “Other headmistresses, please copy. And Piero, please drop those crackpot capers. They will land you in real trouble one day.”

7. Haulleville, Eric de. MÉLANCHOLIA 1
First edition:
Paris: The Dead Language, (c. 1959)
Postcard, 6″ x 4″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer.

From the verso: “gardez ce poeme dans vos bas grace a sa preparation il les protegera des moisissures” (trans. “keep this poem in your stockings thanks to its preparation it will protect them from mold”).

According to BeatBooks catalog #86,  Baron Eric de Haulleville, Olivia’s father, was a Belgian poet and writer who died in France during the second world war, shortly after his daughter’s birth.

8. Tyndall, Thomas. CITY SUMMER NIGHT
First edition:
Paris: The Dead Language, nd. (c. 1959)
Postcard, 6″ x 4″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer.

From the verso: “keep this poem between your sweaters because of its special properties it will protect them from moths”.

9. WHY ARE YOU LOOKING ASKANCE IM JUST TRYING TO SHOUT
a. First edition, cream-colored stock:
Paris: Dead Language, (c. 1959)
Postcard, 4″ x 6″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer.

 

b. First edition, orange-colored stock:
Paris: Dead Language, (c. 1959)
Postcard, 4″ x 6″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer.

 

Note: a publicity card printing a short text by Piero Heliczer on his private press (“the only one left which has not been absorbed by those given over to reminiscence”), and listing the titles and prices of its early publications.

10. MacLise, Angus. STRAIGHT FARTHEST BLOOD TOWARDS (OPENING SECTION)
ph_straightFirst edition:
Paris: The Dead Language Press, 1959
Single 6.25″ x 22″ sheet folded three times to make six printed pages and a cover, 5.5″ x 6.5″, letterpress printed and with a block print  cover by Piero Heliczer. Angus MacLise’s first publication.

According to BeatBooks catalog #86,  it was after noticing a copy of this title in City Lights Books that La Monte Young first became aware of Angus MacLise. When the latter moved to New York in 1961 they began performing together regularly, and it was through Young that MacLise first met John Cale.

11. [anthology] WEDNESDAY PAPER, edited by Piero Heliczer and Angus MacLise
a. First edition, white cover:
New York: The Dead Language Press, (c. 1961)
Saddle-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″,  12 pages, offset printed.  Contributors: Gregory Corso, Cyclops [Lester], Anselm Hollo, Gustav Schiele.

ph_wednesdayb. First edition, pink cover:
New York: The Dead Language Press, (c. 1961)
Saddle-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″,  12 pages, offset printed.  Contributors: Gregory Corso, Cyclops [Lester], Anselm Hollo, Gustav Schiele. This apparent later issue adds the title to Hollo’s poem on the cover.

According to BeatBooks catalog #86,  prints the poems “Song of Stations” by Anselm Hollo and “It Was the Happy Birthday of Death” by Gregory Corso (reputedly included without Corso’s permission). Also features reproductions of a sketch by Egon Schiele (with accompanying texts by him); a holograph letter from Cyclops Lester to Piero Heliczer; a ‘Woman Contest’ (“every two weeks wednesday paper will run photos of the winner and runner up of our quarter moon woman contest”); newspaper clippings; and brief ads. for the Dead Language, New Departures, and “hollands leading litry magazine”, Barbarber.

12. MacLise, Angus. YEAR, A WEDNESDAY PAPER SUPPLEMENT
ph_year
First edition:
New York: The Dead Language Press, 1961
Multiple sheets tape-bound to make a single accordion fold with 12 panels, one for each of the twelve months and an entry for each day, 4.6″ x 9″ (folded), letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer. Cover illustration, “The Ascension of St. Rose of Lima”, by Aubrey Beardsley.

According to BeatBooks catalog #86, the publication prints MacLise’s renaming of every day of the year, some simply assigned a number, but most given poetic names, such as “day of the hearts blood”, “day of the two daughters”, “the shouts from the sea”, and “last day of the autumn feast”. La Monte Young used the calendar to date many of his recordings from the period, including “B-flat Dorian Blues (Fifth Day Of The Hammer)”.

[scans of this item at Brown Digital Repository]

13. Smith, Jack. THE BEAUTIFUL BOOK
ph_beautifulbook
a. First edition:
New York: The Dead Language Press, 1962 Saddle-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 7.5″ x 9″, 20 pages, 200 copies (though it is often claimed that only sixty or so copies were ever completed), letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer. Includes 19 silver gelatin contact prints (2.25″ x 2.25″), one tipped on to each page: 19 photographs by Jack Smith, and 1 portrait of Jack Smith by Ken Jacobs. Cover art by Marian Zazeela.

b. Facsimile edition, second printing:
New York: Granary Books / Plaster Foundation, 2001
Saddle-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 7.5″ x 9″, 20 pages, Includes 19 silver gelatin contact prints (2.25″ x 2.25″) made from the original negatives, one tipped on to each page: 19 photographs by Jack Smith, and 1 portrait of Jack Smith by Ken Jacobs. Cover art by Marian Zazeela.

Note: a printed sheet issued with the Granary Books / Plaster Foundation edition in 2001 stated: Noting the scarcity of this title on the rare book market and its absence from many prominent collections (not to mention the chaotic circumstances in which it was produced) it is likely that considerably fewer than 200 books were actually nished and distributed. Jack Smith, Piero Heliczer, and their associates assembled the books during the late spring and early summer of 1962 before shooting began on Smith’s seminal film Flaming Creatures (1963), one of the most notorious underground films of the 1960s, which became a test case of censorship laws.

14. FOLDING CHAIR OF THE PRINTING MASTER, A CATALOG OF ITEMS PRINTED BY THE DEAD LANGUAGE 1963
First edition:
New York: The Dead Language Press, 1963
Saddle-stapled in printed and illustrated wrappers, 4.75″ x 5″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer. Cover art by Aubrey Beardsley.

Note: a catalogue of Dead Language editions listing seven publications, each one including the price and pithy comments or quotes. The text ends: “make checks payable to piero heliczer”.

15. Hollo, Anselm. LOVER MAN
ph_lover
First edition:
New York: The Dead Language Press, (1963)

Accordion-bound sheets laid into printed and illustrated wrappers, 6.75″ x 8.75″, 12 pages, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer. Cover art (“Le Viol”, 1934) by Rene Magritte.

According to BeatBooks catalog #86, the Folding Chair Dead Language catalog describes the publication as “a very free translation of the lemminkainen cantos of the kalevala” (a 19th century work of epic poetry compiled from Karelian and Finnish oral folklore and mythology). (©BeatBooks.com)

16. FOLDING CHAIR OF THE PRINTING MASTER, A CATALOG OF ITEMS PRINTED BY THE DEAD LANGUAGE 1963
First edition:
Paris: The Dead Language Press, 1963
Multiple sheets tape-bound to make a single accordion fold with 8 panels, 4.75″ x 5″, letterpress printed by Piero Heliczer. Cover art by Aubrey Beardsley.

Note: a catalogue of Dead Language editions listing ten publications, with The Beautiful Book, The First Battle of the Marne, and Loverman added to the seven titles listed in the earlier edition, the first two featuring quotes from Ron Rice and Fielding Dawson respectively.

[facsimile at Brown University Library digital repository]

17. [anthology] CORONA SPINARUM: SON OF WEDNESDAY PAPER, OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE EMPIRE OF EUROPE & THE PIERO HELICZER FAN CLUB, Vol. 1, No. 1, edited by Piero Heliczer
First edition:
Amsterdam: Piero Heliczer, October 1980
Folded and gathered unbound sheets, 5.75″ x 8.25″, 8 pages, photocopy printed.
[not in archive]

Note: prints the abstracts from the first meeting of the Imperial Council, attended by Piero, Bill Levy and Ira Cohen.

18. [anthology] DE VROUWE VAN ALLE VOLKEREN [trans. THE LADY OF ALL NATIONS], edited by Piero Heliczer
First edition:
Amsterdam: Piero Heliczer, 1981
Folded and gathered unbound sheets, 5.75″ x 8.25″, 12 pages, photocopy printed.
[not in archive]

Note: includes a map of Amsterdam with numbers encircled of places of importance, a professional horoscope reading (by Ronnie Dreyer),  holy texts of Saints, and  an ad for a marijuana sweepstakes.

19. [anthology] CORONA SPINARUM, No. 3, edited by Piero Heliczer
First edition:
Amsterdam: Piero Heliczer, 1981
Folded and gathered unbound sheets, 5.85″ x 8.3″, 12 pages, photocopy printed.
[not in archive]

Note: announces a poetry reading by Heliczer, and prints various texts (on Thomas Beckett, Bernadette Soubirous, Jeanne d’Arc, and Thérèse de Lisieux) in French, Dutch and English.

Cut-Up Method

The cut-up technique (or découpé in French) is an aleatory literary technique in which a text is cut up and rearranged to create a new text. The concept can be traced to at least the Dadaists of the 1920s, but was popularized in the late 1950s and early 1960s by writer William S. Burroughs…

The following is a select and incomplete checklist


MAGAZINES

ARCADE, Nos. 1-5, edited by Martin Leman
London: Arcade, 1964-1966
Contributors include: William S. Burroughs, David Cripps, David Kozubei, Stan Peskett, Ron Sandford, Rufus Segar, Georges Sheridan. Issue No.1 is Special Burroughs issue (Maynard & Miles C84-86).

BULLETIN FROM NOTHING, Nos. 1-2, edited by Mary Beach and Claude Pélieu
San Francisco: Beach Books, 1965
Contributors include: Chano Pozo, Mary Beach, William S. Burroughs, Claude Pélieu, Bob Kaufman

FRUIT CUP, No. 0, edited by Mary Beach and Claude Pélieu
New York: Beach Books, 1969
Contributors include: Allen Ginsberg, Wallace Berman, William S. Burroughs, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Claude Pélieu, Edward Sanders, Jan Jacques Lebel, Mary Beach, Tuli Kupferberg, Peter Orlovsky, Albert Hoffman, Rochelle Owens

GINGER SNAPS, edited by Michael Gibbs and Hammond Guthrie
Exeter: Kontexts, March 1972
Contributors include Williams S. Burroughs (“Abstract”), Harold Norse, Allen Ginsberg, Mary Beach, Jan Herman, Carl Weissner, Jürgen Ploog, Claude Pélieu, Bob Kaufman, Tuli Kupferberg, Charles Plymell, Tom Phillips, John Giorno, Jochen Gerz

GNAOUA, No. 1, edited by Ira Cohen
Tangier: Gnaoua Press, 1964
Contributors include: William S. Burroughs, Ian Sommerville, Brion Gysin, Harold Norse, Allen Ginsberg, Michael McClure, J. Sheeper, Jack Smith, Marc Shleifer, Mohammed Ben Abdullah Yussufi (translated by Irving Rosenthal), J. Weir, Stuart Gordon, Tatiana, Alfred Jarry, (translated by George Andrews), Jabouna Min Soudan (translated by Christopher Wanklyn)

GROWING HAND, edited by Vincent J. Cresciman
San Francisco: Growing Hand, 1967
Contributors include: Irving Rosenthal, Ira Cohen, Alphonse Bouguereau, Fielding Dawson, Peter Birnbaum, Harold Norse, Melvin Clay, Susan Sherman, Piero Heliczer, Vincent Cresciman, John Foret, Maya Andrews.

THE INSECT TRUST GAZETTE, Nos. 1-3, edited by Leonard Belasco, Jed Irwin, Robert Basara, and Bill Levy
Philadelphia and San Francisco: Insect Trust Gazette, 1964-1968
Contributors include: Stewart Paley, Thomas Jackrell, William Levy, Michael Benedikt, Jed Irwin, William S. Burroughs, Leonard Belasco, Robert Basara, Stuart Gordon, Jackson Mac Low, Brion Gysin, Conrad A. Belano, Carol Bergé, Max Ernst & Paul Eluard, Paul Klee, Hans Arp, Antonin Artaud, Jean Genet.

Intrepid, edited by Allen DeLoach (Buffalo, 1969) [No. 14/15, Special Burroughs issue].

Klacto 23, edited by Carl Weissner (Heidleberg, New York, Frankfurt, 1965-1969).

The Last Times, edited by Charles Plymell and Claude Pélieu (San Francisco, 1967).

The Moving Times, edited by William S. Burroughs and Alex Trocchi (London 1963).

My Own Mag, edited by Jeff Nuttall (London 1963-1967).

Notes from Underground, edited by John Bryan (San Francisco, 1970) [No. 3].

Residu, edited by Daniel Richter (Athens and London, 1965-1966).

The San Francisco Earthquake, edited by Jan Herman (San Francisco, 1967-1969)

UFO, edited by Jurgen Ploog, Jorg Fauser, Carl Weissner (Frankfurt, 1971-1972).


COLLABORATIONS / ANTHOLOGIES

The Braille Film. Carl Weissner, William S. Burroughs (San Francisco: Nova Broadcast Press, 1970)

Brion Gysin Let The Mice In, edited by Jan Herman with texts by William Burroughs and Ian Sommerville (West Glover: Something Else Press 1973).

The Exterminator. Brion Gysin and William Burroughs (San Francisco: Auerhahn Press/Dave Haselwood Books, 1960, 1967).

Minutes to Go. Brion Gysin, William S. Burroughs, Gregory Corso and Sinclair
Belles (Paris: Two Cities Editions, 1960; San Francisco: Beach Books,
1968).

Oeuvre Croisee (The Third Mind). Brion Gysin and William S. Burroughs (Paris: Flammarion, 1976; New York: Viking Press, 1978; London: John
Calder, 1979).

So Who Owns Death TV? William S. Burroughs, Claude Pélieu, Carl Weissner (San Francisco: Beach Books, Texts & Documents, 1967).


MARY BEACH

Electric Banana (Darmstadt: Melzer Verlag, 1970).


WILLIAM S. BURROUGHS

The Soft Machine (Paris: Olympia Press, 1959; New York: Grove Press, 1963).

The Ticket That Exploded (Paris: Olympia Press, 1962; New York: Grove Press, 1967).

Nova Express (New York: Grove Press, 1964) The final part of the cut-up trilogy. (Maynard & Miles A10a)


BRION GYSIN

The Process (New York: Doubleday, 1969; London: Jonathan Cape,
1970).


… and more to come with Claude Pélieu, Harold Norse, others…

Souce, in part: AQ14 CUT UP, 1973.

Beatitude

Beatitudethe quintessential Beat magazine—was “edited & produced on a kick or miss basis by a few hardy types who sneak out of alleys near Grant Avenue—the only responsible party being: John Kelly, publisher….” The magazine was founded in 1958 by Kelly, William J. Margolis, and jazz/surrealist poet Bob Kaufman, who said it “was designed to extol beauty and promote the beatific life among the various mendicants, neo-existentialists, christs, poets, painters, musicians and other inhabitants and observers of North Beach.”

Beatitude was initially printed on a mimeo machine at Pierre Delattre’s Bread and Wine Mission. Contributors included Allen Ginsberg, Lenore Kandel, ruth weiss, Philip Lamantia, Gregory Corso Richard Brautigan, and the editors, among dozens of others. There are 34 issues in the magazine’s first incarnation.

Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts

Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts ran for thirteen issues from 1962 to 1965. Considered one of the most influential underground magazines of the early sixties, Ed Sanders’ Fuck You was a deliberately fypprovocative mimeographed journal, at first emphasizing poetry and later expanding to include other writing. Each issue is illustrated with line drawings by Sanders.

Contributors include Sanders, Tuli Kupferberg, Carol Bergé, John Wieners, Andy Warhol, Ray Bremser, Lenore Kandel, Charles Olson, Joel Oppenheimer, Peter Orlovsky, Philip Whalen, Allen Ginsberg, Herbert Huncke, Julian Beck, Frank O’Hara, Leroi Jones, Diane Di Prima, William Burroughs, Gary Snyder, Robert Kelly, Judith Malina, Carl Solomon, Gregory Corso, Robert Duncan, Robert Creeley, Michael McClure, Ted Berrigan, Joe Brainard, Gilbert Sorrentino, and many others — a virtual “who’s who” of avant garde poetry in the Sixties.


1. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 1, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: February 1962

2. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 2, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: April 1962

3. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 3, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: June 1962

4. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 4, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: August 1962

5. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 5, Vol. 1, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: December 1962
First edition, side-stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, mimeograph. Cover by Ed Sanders.

Note: “Dedicated to pacifism, national defense thru nonviolent resistance, total assault on the culture, vaginal zapping, multilateral indiscriminate apertural conjugation, Hole Cons, Crotch Lake, Peace Eye, mad bands of stompers for peace, & all those groped by J. Edgar Hoover in the silent halls of congress.”

6. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, No. 5, Vol. 2, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: December 1962

7. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Number 5, Volume 3, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: May 1963

Note: “Dedicated to pacifism, National Defense thru Nonviolent Resistance, Anarchia the Goddess, Orlovsky’s long Egyptian finger, Peace Eye, Hole Cons, Peace Walk Dicking, dope thrill Banana rites, Acapulco Gold, Panamanian Red, Honduras Brown, windowbox freak grass, the anarcho-commio-greaser conspiracy, submarine boarders, mad bands of stompers for Peace, and all those groped by J. Edgar Hoover in the silent halls of Congress”.

8. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Number 5, Volume 4, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: Summer 1963

9. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Number 5, Volume 5, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: December 1963

10. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Number 5, Volume 6, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: April/May 1963

11. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Number 5, Volume 7, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: September 1964

12. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Volume 5, Number 8, edited by Ed Sanders
New York: March 1965
Cover artwork by Andy Warhol.

13. FUCK YOU/ A MAGAZINE OF THE ARTS, Volume 5, Number 9
New York: June 1965

[n.b. notes have not been made about archive inclusion of items]


Online Resources:

· Reality Studio – Fuck You Press Archive