Tag Archives: little magazines

The San Francisco Capitalist Bloodsucker-N

Published during the so-called “magazine wars” of the early 1960s, George Stanley’s THE SAN FRANCISCO CAPITALIST BLOODSUCKER-N lasted just one issue. Stan Persky, Lew Ellingham, and Gail Chugg edited M, gathering contributions from a box at  Gino & Carlo’s Bar in San Francisco’s North Beach. Richard Duerden was editing FOOT; with Ron Loewinsohn he was also editing THE RIVOLI REVIEW, produced in Duerden’s apartment on Rivoli Street in the Haight-Ashbury district. Loewinsohn and Richard Brautigan soon produced another magazine, CHANGE.

As Ron Loewinsohn recalled, “Everybody seemed to have access to a mimeograph machine. You could then put out your own magazine. This was marvelous: it meant instant publication, instant reaction from people.”

It wasn’t until 1964, that Stan Persksy’s OPEN SPACE took up the publishing necessary to the Jack Spicer circle and its friends…

THE SAN FRANCISCO CAPITALIST BLOODSUCKER-N, edited by George Stanley
mags_capitalistSan Francisco: n.p., 1962
First edition, corner stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 19 pages, mimeograph. Cover art by Fran Herndon (?)

Contributors: Albert J. Rutaro, Richard Duerden, Robin Blaser, Larry Fagin, Ron Loewinsohn, Tony Sherrod, Maxwell Bodenheim, John Allen Ryan, James Keilty, Bob Wrobel, George Stanley, Robert Reinstein, Fran Herndon, Jack Spicer.

COW (the magazine)

Inspired by Stan Persky’s OPEN SPACE, Luther T. Cupp edited COW, which ran for three issues from 1965-1966. Cupp was nicknamed “Link” by Jack Spicer and went by the name Link Martin.

mags_cow01

 

Contributors to this short-lived North Beach magazine include:  Lawrence (Larry) Fagin, Stan Persky, Robin Blaser, George Stanley, Harold Dull, Joanne Kyger, Jack Spicer, Ronnie Primack, and others.
(further reading…)

Cow

Inspired by Stan Persky’s OPEN SPACE, Luther T. Cupp edited COW, which ran for three issues from 1965-1966. Cupp was nicknamed “Link” by Jack Spicer and went by the name Link Martin.

1. COW, The San Francisco Magazine of Livestock, No. 1, Cow Soup Issue, edited by Luther T. Cupp
mags_cow01(San Francisco): (Cow) (1965)
First edition, side stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 11 pages, mimeograph.

Contributors: Doug Palmer, Deneen Brown, Lawrence Fagin, Stan Persky, Robin Blaser, J. Mac Innis, George Stanley, Harold Dull, Joanne Kyger, Jack Spicer, Ronnie Primack, Link.

2. COW, The Magazine of Afro-Judeo Culture, No. 2, The Un-escalation Issue, edited by Luther T. Cupp
mags_cow02(San Francisco): (Cow) (1965)
First edition, side stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 11 pages, mimeograph.

Contributors: Jim Thurber, Robin Blaser, Stan Persky, Bill Brodecky, Mike Hannon, Larry Fagin, Geoff Brown, Michael Ratcliffe, Joanne Kyger, Jamie MacInnis, Luis Garcia, J.C. Alexander, Gail Dusenbery, Hune Voelcker, George Stanley.

3. COW, No. 3, Pregnant Cow Issue, edited by Luter T. Cupp
mags_cow03(San Francisco): (Cow) (1966)
First edition, side stapled printed wrappers, 8.5″ x 11″, 11 pages, mimeograph.

Contributors: Bill Deemer and Andrew Hoyem, Stephen Mindel, Marga NewComb, Robin Blaser, Michael Ratcliffe, H.M. Wickenheiser, Jim Semark, Helen Adam, Gordon Gatom, Mike Hannon, SMN.

Gryphon

Born on January 2, 1922, Richard Rubenstein began his literary career in a local prep school when he won a poetry contest. Associated with the Beat Poets in the San Francisco Bay Area, Rubenstein worked to found and edit several small press poetry journals – Neurotica, first published in spring of 1948; Inferno, in late 1949; and Gryphon, in spring of 1950. In Gryphon he published early works of Robert Creeley and Denise Levertov, as well as the established authors Henry Treece, D.H. Emblem, e.e. cummings, and Cid Corman. He himself published a small chapbook, Beer and Angels, and produced a long manuscript of collected poems which went unpublished. Rubenstein’s health deteriorated because of his long-standing nervous condition and the alcohol he drank to combat it. He died on Yom Kippur in 1958.

1. GRYPHON, No. 1, edited by Richard Rubinstein
San Francisco: Gryphon, Spring 1950

2. GRYPHON, No. 2, edited by Richard Rubinstein
San Francisco: Gryphon, Fall 1950

3. GRYPHON, No. 3, edited by Richard Rubinstein
San Francisco: Gryphon, Spring 1951

HEARSE, A VEHICLE USED TO CONVEY THE DEAD

Starting with the publication of HEARSE 1 in 1957, E. V. Griffith’s HEARSE PRESS would go on to publish 17 issues of the little magazine, a series of 18 chapbooks including Charles Bukowski’s mags_hearse01first, and COFFIN, a portfolio of broadsides. Among those published by HEARSE PRESS are Richard Brautigan, Charles Bukowski, Judson Crews, Russell Atkins, Mason Jordan Mason, Larry Eigner, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Allen Ginsberg, Joel Oppenheimer, Paul Blackburn, Robert Creeley, LeRoi Jones, and many more.

According to Griffith in SHEAF, HEARSE, COFFIN, POETRY NOW: A HISTORY (Hearse Press, 1996):
“In format, HEARSE was a center-stapled booklet 5.5″ x 8.5″ page size; the wire staples which held the propensity for rusting. The Rhino Bristol cover stock ran through several different colors — blue, gray, green, yellow, and (much later) pink — with the name in buk_flowerblack ink. (A few issues varied this by using white cover stock, and a colored ink.) Its appearance owed much to — in fact, almost copied — Larsen’s EXISTARIA.” (more…)

Hearse

HEARSE, A VEHICLE USED TO CONVEY THE DEAD ran for 17 issues and was published by E. V. Griffith’s Hearse Press from 1957 until 1972. According to Griffith in SHEAF, HEARSE, COFFIN, POETRY NOW: A HISTORY (Hearse Press, 1996):

“In format, HEARSE was a center-stapled booklet 5.5″ x 8.5″ page size; the wire staples which held the propensity for rusting. The Rhino Bristol cover stock ran through several different colors — blue, gray, green, yellow, and (much later) pink — with the name in black ink. (A few issues varied this by using white cover stock, and a colored ink.) Its appearance owed much to — in fact, almost copied — Larsen’s EXISTARIA.”

1. HEARSE, No. 1, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse01Eureka: Hearse Press, 1957
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 24 pages, 100 copies, offset.

Contents: poems by Joel Oppenheimer, Robert Creeley, Raymond Souster, Larry Eigner, Jonathan Williams, Langston Hughes, Louis Dudek, Gil Orlovitz, David Cornel DeJong, Bariss Mills, Judson Crews and 11 other poets; artwork by Kenneth Lawrence Beaudoin, and Lawrence Ferlinghetti, an excerpt from the autobiography of Dick Stud, and a collage by Mercy Pennis Hyman.

2. HEARSE, No. 2, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse02Eureka: Hearse Press, 1957
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 24 pages, offset.

Contents: poems by Gil Orlovitz, Langston Hughes, Robert Creeley, Charles Bukowski, Joel Oppenheimer, Lloyd Zimpel, Richard Brautigan, Theodore Enslin, John Forbis, Alden A. Nolan, Raymond Souster and 16 other poets; artwork by E. V. Griffith, and Henry Miller, and a short story by Harold Witt.

3. HEARSE, No. 3, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse03Eureka: Hearse Press, 1958
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 32 pages, offset.

Contents: poems by Kenneth Rexroth, Langston Hughes, Alden A. Nolan, Gil Orlovitz, Judson Crews, David Cornel DeJong, Carol Ely Harper, Mason Jordan Mason, Richard Brautigan, Raymond Souster, Clarence Major, and 5 other poets; artwork by Kenneth Lawrence Beaudoin, and Ben Tibbs, and a short story by R. T. Taylor.

4. HEARSE, No. 4, edited by E. V. Griffith
Eureka: Hearse Press, 1958
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 16 pages, offset.

Contents: poems by Russell Atkins, Charles Bukowski, Maxine Cassin, Paul Blackburn, Mortimer Tission, and 10 other poets; artwork by E. V. Griffith, and Farley Gay, and a short story by Mary Graham Lund.

5. HEARSE, No. 5, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse05Eureka: Hearse Press, 1959
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 20 pages, offset.

Contents: poems by Allen Ginsburg, Paul Blackburn, Robert Creeley, LeRoi Jones, Joel Oppenheimer, David Cornel DeJong, Frederick Eckman, Alden A. Nolan, Walter Lowenfels, and 8 other poets; artwork by E. V. Griffith.

6. HEARSE, No. 6, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse06Eureka: Hearse Press, 1960
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 20 pages, offset.

Contents: poems by George Scarborough, Felix Stefanie, Russell Atkins, Gil Orlovitz, Jon Barkley Hart, Maxine Cassin, Judson Crews, and 5 other poets; artwork by E. V. Griffith, and Bob Brown, a short story by Clarence Major, and a excerpt from the autobiography of Raven Lunatick.

7. HEARSE, No. 7, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse07Eureka: Hearse Press, 1960
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 16 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by David Cornel DeJong, Langston Hughes, Charles Bukowski, Raymond Souster, Patricia Hooper, Larry Eigner, Gil Orlovitz, Jack Anderson, Diane DiPrima, Judson Crews, and 8 other poets, and a short story by Mary Graham Lund.

8. HEARSE, No. 8, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse08Eureka: Hearse Press, 1961
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 16 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Charles Bukowski, Jonathan Williams, Gil Orlovitz, Frederick Eckman, Maxine Cassin, Russell Atkins, and 11 other poets, and a short story by Irving Halperin.

9. HEARSE, No. 9, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse09Eureka: Hearse Press, 1961
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 16 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Paul Blackburn, Richard Brautigan, Gil Orlovitz, Robert S. Ward, George Scarborough, and 4 other poets.

10. HEARSE, No. 10, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse10Eureka: Hearse Press, 1969
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 32 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Winfield Towny Scott, Charles Bukowski, Marge Piercy, Harold Witt, William Childress, Maxine Cassin, Dave Etter, Theodore Enslin, Carroll Arnett, and 9 other poets.

11. HEARSE, No. 11, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse11Eureka: Hearse Press, 1969
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 48 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by William Childress, Robert Bly, Charles Bukowski, Hayden Carruth, Kathleen Fraser, Larry Eigner, Lyn Lifshin, Harold Witt, Vern Rutsala, Robert Mezey, Gerg Kuzma, Thomas Mayer, Nancy, Willard, George Hitchcock, Keith Wilson, Rochelle OWents, Dave Etter, Carroll Arnett, Peter Wild, Terry Stokes, and 12 other poets.

12. HEARSE, No. 12, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse12Eureka: Hearse Press, 1970
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 44 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Diane Wakowski, Robert Mezey, John Haines, Dave Etter, Charles Simic, William Childress, Charles Wright, Michael Benedikt, William Matthews, David Ingatow, Harold Witt, Rochelle Owens, David Antin, Robert Gershon, and 17 other poets.

13. HEARSE, No. 13, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse13Eureka: Hearse Press, 1970
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 52 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Marge Piercy, Charles Simic, Marvin Applewhite, Jack Anderson, Michael Benedikt, Howard McCord, Dave Etter, Nancy Willard, Lewis Warsh, Gerard Malanga, Harold Bond, Keith Wilson, Morton Marcus, John Gill, and 11 other poets.

14. HEARSE, No. 14, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse14Eureka: Hearse Press, 1970
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 52 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by James Schevill, Philip Levine, Nancy Willard, Marvin Bell, Larry Eigner, Stephen Sandy, James Welch, Charles Bukowski, Robert Peters, William Childress, Marge Piercy, Harold Witt, James Tate, Adrien Stoutenburg, Peter Wild, Carolyn Stoloff, Terry Stokes, Harley Elliott, and 20 other poets.

15. HEARSE, No. 15, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse15Eureka: Hearse Press, 1971
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 64 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Hayden Caruth, William Matthews, Marge Piercy, Charles Bukowski, John Woods, Herbert Scott, Gary Gilder, William Childress, Greg Kuzma, Theodore Enslin, Albert Goldbarth, Jack Anderson, Peter Wild, Michael G. Culross, H.L. Van Brunt, Lyn Lifshin, Norman Dubie, and 30 other poets.

16. HEARSE, No. 16, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse16Eureka: Hearse Press, 1971
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 64 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Harold Witt, Daniel Hoffman, Philip Booth, Ted Kooser, David Wagoner, William Matthews, David Ingatow, Robert Mezey, Larry Levis, Paul Zimmer, Dave Etter, Carolyn Stoloff, Lyn Lifshin, Charles Edward Eaton, Ernest Kroll, David Hilton, Sonya Dorman, Robert Hershson, Terry Stokes, and 28 other poets.

17. HEARSE, No. 17, edited by E. V. Griffith
mags_hearse17Eureka: Hearse Press, 1972
First edition, stapled printed wrappers, 5.5″ x 8.5″, 88 pages, letterpress.

Contents: poems by Charles Bukowski, Harold Norse, X.J. Kennedy, Robert Mezey, James Schevill, Charles Wright, John Woods, William Childress, Russell Edson, Peter Everyone, Colette Inez, Douglas Blazek, Thomas Lux, William Witherup, Robert Hershon, Peter Wild, Lyn Lifshin, Geof Hewitt, Dave Kelly, Stephen Dunn, William Hathaway, Adrien Stoutenburg, and 39 other poets.

Hearse Press

mags_hearse01

 

 

Starting with the publication of HEARSE 1 in 1957, E. V. Griffith’s HEARSE PRESS would go on to publish 17 issues of the little magazine, a series of 18 chapbooks including Charles Bukowski’s first, and COFFIN, a portfolio of broadsides. Among those published by HEARSE PRESS are Richard Brautigan, Charles Bukowski, Judson Crews, Russell Atkins, Mason Jordan Mason, Larry Eigner, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Allen Ginsberg, Joel Oppenheimer, Paul Blackburn, Robert Creeley, LeRoi Jones, and many more.

A. Hearse, A Vehicle Used to Convey the Dead

B. Hearse Press Chapbooks

C. Coffin


References consulted:
E.V. Griffith. SHEAF, HEARSE, COFFIN, POETRY NOW: A HISTORY Eureka: Hearse Press, 1996

Judson Crews

crews_buk

Judson Crews, poet, editor, publisher, and book dealer, was born June 30, 1917, in Waco, Texas. Crews received both the B.A. (1941) and M.A. (1944) in Sociology from Baylor University, and during 1946-1947 studied fine arts at Baylor. In addition, Crews did graduate study at the University of Texas, El Paso in 1967. He has worked as an educator at Wharton County Junior College, New Mexico (1967-1970), the University of New Mexico, Gallup Branch (1971-1972), and at the University of Zambia (1974-1978). He has also been involved in social work. After two years in the U. S. Army Medical Corps during World War II, Crews moved his family and business, Motive Press, from Waco, Texas, to Taos, New Mexico, where he began his writing and publishing career in earnest.

Judson Crews was a prominent figure in the Southwest poetry scene as a poet, editor, and publisher of contemporary poetry and art magazines. Crews admittedly wrote under numerous pseudonyms. Of these pseudonyms, Willard Emory Betis, Trumbull Drachler, Cerise Farallon (Mrs. Trumbull Drachler, maiden name Lena Johnston), and Tobi Macadams have been clearly identified. In the instance of these, and possibly many other pseudonymous names, Crews created a fantasy world of writers to encompass, perhaps, the breadth of his literary ambitions.

Crews’ publishing activities began in earnest after his move from Texas to the Taos area. He started the Este Es Press in 1946, which remained in operation until 1966. The little magazines with which he was involved from 1940 to 1966 include The Deer and Dachshund, The Flying Fish, Motive, The Naked Ear, Poetry Taos, Suck-Egg Mule: A Recalcitrant Beast, Taos: A Deluxe Magazine of the Arts, and Vers Libre. Together with Scott Greer, he was co-editor of Crescendo: A Laboratory for Young America, and worked with Jay Waite on Gale. Crews published not only his own chapbooks and magazines but also those of his friends and colleagues, including the Zambian poet Mason Jordan Mason, among others. In conjunction with this printing activity, Crews operated the Motive Book Shop which became a focal point for the dissemination and advocacy of avant-garde poetry, important little magazines and literary reviews, as well as so-called pornographic materials. The material that Crews sold ranged from literary classics such as the works of D. H. Lawrence and Henry Miller, to hard-to-obtain domestic and foreign avant-garde journals, and nudist magazines. Crews was also a friend as well as an advocate of Henry Miller and continued to sell Miller’s works after they were banned in the United States.


Judson Crews Checklist:

Section A: Books
Section B: Contributions to Books and Anthologies
Section C: Contributions to Periodicals
Section D: Books Edited and Published
Section E: Periodicals Edited and Published


A Select and limited sampling…

Mason Jordan Mason
THE YARDARM OF MURPHEY’S KITE
crews_theyardarmRanches of Taos: Motive Press, 1956
First edition, 4to., [48] pp. Introduction by Chris Bjerknes, “Mason Jordan Mason: An Appreciation”. White, plastic comb binding with decorated board covers. Photographs cut from magazines on both sides of covers, with title and author name letterpress printed in blue on front. Additional magazine images throughout. The images appear to come from nudist, girly, travel, and other magazines. Each copy presumably is unique. [Some have suggested that Mason Jordan Mason is a pseudonym for Judson Crews who admitedly used several pseudonyms. See biographical sketch.] 

Judson Crews, editor 
POETRY TAOS, Number One.
crews_poetrytaosRanches of Taos: n.p., 1957
First edition, 4to., [64] pp. White, plastic comb binding with decorated board covers. Photographs cut from magazines on both sides of covers, with title and author name letterpress printed in blue on front. Numerous similar leaves in text. The images appear to come from nudist, girly, travel, and other magazines. Each copy presumably is unique. Introduction by Judson Crews. Contributors include: Wolcott Ely, Gaston Criell, William Carlos Williams, Mason Jordan Mason, Robert Creeley, Robert Burdette, Max Fenstein, Hyacinthe Hill, Joseph Foster, Cerise Farallon, Judson Crews, Donn Cantonwine, Murry Moore, Wendell B. Anderson. 


Further research and reading:

Biographical information


References consulted:

Anderson, Wendell. THE HEART’S PRECISION (Carson: Dumont Press, 1994)

Taylor, Kent  and Alan Horvath.  LOOKING FOR D.A. LEVY (RANDOM SIGHTINGS): THE D.A. LEVY BIBLIOGRAPHY, Volume 1 and 2 (Kirpan Press, 2006, 2008)

THE WORMWOOD REVIEW, Issue No. 19 (Storrs: Wormwood Review Press, 1965)

Charles Bukowski: Miscellaneous Prose

>> return to CHARLES BUKOWSKI main page >>

SECTION E:
This index includes book and periodical appearances of letters, commentary, introductions, reviews, etc. in  the 1960’s: from Bukowski’s first book appearance to roughly the time that his work started being published in collected volumes by John Martin’s Black Sparrow Press; the period of time covered by Sanford Dorbin’s Bibliography.


1. NOMAD, No. 5/6, edited by Donald Factor and Anthony Linick
mags_nomad056Culver City, Winter-Spring I960
“Manifesto: A Call For Our Own Critics” [commentary]
(Dorbin D11)



2. THE OUTSIDER, No. 1, edited by Jon Edgar & Gypsy Lou Webb
mags_outsider01New Orleans: Loujon Press, Fall 1961
“Contributor’s Note” [commentary]
(Dorbin D17)




101. BLACK CAT REVIEW, No. 2, edited by Neeli Cherry
mags_blackcat01San Bernardino: The Cherry Press, March 1963
“Yes, Cherry…” [letter],  “Dear Neeli…] letter
(not in Dorbin)

 

 

119. RENAISSANCE, Vol. 1, No. 4, edited by John Bryan
San Francisco: Renaissance Publications, Winter, 1962
“Peace, Baby, Is Hard Sell” [letter]
(Dorbin D18)

 

 

3. LITERARY TIMES, Vol. 2, No. 4, edited by Jay Robert Nash
Chi­cago: Literary Times, March 1963
“Charles Bukowski Speaks Out” [interview]
(Dorbin D19)

4. THE OUTSIDER, Vol. 1, No. 3, edited by Jon Edgar & Gypsy Lou Webb
mags_outsider03
New Orleans: Loujon Press, Spring 1963
“Dear Jon & Gypsy…”[letter], [letter], [letter] “Letters to The Editors from: Charles Bukowski”
(Dorbin D20-22)



5. MAINSTREAM, Vol. 16, No. 6, edited by R.R. Cuscaden
mags_mainstream1606New York City, June 1963
“Little Magazines In America” [commentary]
(Dorbin D23)




6. LITERARY TIMES, Vol. 3, No. 4, edited by Jay Robert Nash
Chi­cago: Literary Times, May 1964
“Examining My Peers” [commentary]
(Dorbin D24)

6. LITERARY TIMES, Vol. 4, No. 2, edited by Jay Robert Nash
Chi­cago: Literary Times, December 1964
“Here’s What I Say” [interview]
(Dorbin D25)

7. MR. CLEAN AND OTHER POEMS by John William Corrington
San Francisco: Amber House Press, 1964
“Introduction”
(Dorbin D28)

8. FERMENT, No. 6, edited by Zoe Climenhaga
Canton: Transient Press, June 1965
“Lightning in a Dry Summer” [review of Corrington’s ANATOMY OF LOVE…]
(Dorbin D30)

9. KAURI, No. 10, edited by Will Inman
New York: n.p., September-October 1965
“L.A. sept. 1965 hello Will Inman:…” [letter]
(Dorbin D31)

10. INTERMISSION, Vol. 1, No. 20, edited by Gene Cole
Chicago: Hull House Theatre, October 1965
“Dear Mr. Cole” [letter]
(Dorbin D32)

11. MY FACE IN WAX by Jory Sherman
Chicago: Windfall Press, 1965
“Introduction”
(Dorbin D33)

12. STEPPENWOLF, No. 1, edited by Susan Fromberg Schaeffer
Winter 1965-66
“Another Burial of a Once-Talent” [review of Corrington]
(Dorbin D34)

13. EARTH, No. 2, edited by Steve Richmond
Santa Monica: Earth Books, 1966
“In Defense of Poetry, a Certain Type of Life, a Certain Type of Blood-Filled Creature Who Will Someday Die” [commentary]
(Dorbin D35)

14. EL CORNO EMPLUMADO, No. 17, edited by Margaret Randall
Mexico City: El Corno Emplumado, January 1966
“Have been meaning to write…” [letter]
(Dorbin D36)

15. INTREPID, No. 8, edited by Allen de Loach
Buffalo: Intrepid Press, June 1967
“Letter from Charles Bukowski” [letter]
(Dorbin D55)

J

Jack Spicer’s J ran for eight issues: Nos. 1–5 were edited by Spicer in North Beach where contributions were left in a box marked “J” in The Place, a bar on Grant Avenue in San Francisco; Nos. 6 and 7 (an Apparition of the late J) were edited by George Stanley in San Francisco and New York City respectively while no. 8 was edited by Harold Dull in Rome. Spicer believed that poetry was for poets and the magazine had a small circulation but cast a long shadow. Contributors included: Robin Blaser, Richard Brautigan, Bruce Boyd, Kay Johnson, Robert Duncan, Joe Dunn, Ron Loewinsohn, Joanne Kyger, Helen Adam, and others. Covers (sometimes hand-embellished) were by Fran Herndon (Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5), Russell FitzGerald (No. 3), and George Stanley (Nos. 6, 7).


J, No. 1, edited by Jack Spicer
mags_j01San Francisco: J, 1959
Corner-stapled sheets in printed cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 38 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover by Fran Herndon. Contributors: James Alexander, Ebbe Borregaard, Robin Blaser, Jack Spicer, Joe Dunn, Richard Brautigan, Kay Johnson, Robert Duncan.

J, No. 2, edited by Jack Spicer
San Francisco: J, 1959
Corner-stapled sheets in printed cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 36 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover by Fran Herndon. Contributors: George Stanley, Fran HerndonJess Collins, Robert Duncan, Stan Persky.

J, No. 3, edited by Jack Spicer
San Francisco: J, 1959
Corner-stapled sheets in printed and hand-painted cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 38 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover by Russell FitzGerald. Contributors: Bruce Boyd, Ron Loewinsohn, George Stanley, Damon Beard, Jack Spicer.

J, No. 4, edited by Jack Spicer
mags_j04San Francisco: J, 1959
Corner-stapled sheets in printed and hand-painted cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 36 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover by Fran Herndon. Contributors:
Robert Duncan, Richard Brautigan, Joanne Kyger, Donald Allen, John Ryan, George Stanley,
Jack Spicer.

J, No. 5, edited by Jack Spicer
mags_j05San Francisco: J, 1959
Corner-stapled sheets in printed and hand-painted cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 34 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover by Fran Herndon. Contributors:
Larry Eigner, Jess CollinsRichard Brautigan,  Kay Johnson, Ron Loewinsohn, George Stanley,  Robert Duncan, Richard Duerden, Jack Spicer.

J, No. 6, edited by George Stanley
San Francisco: J, 1959
Corner-stapled sheets in printed cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 38 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover by George Stanley. Contributors: Helen Adam, Paul Goodman, Joanne Kyger, Ron Loewinsohn.



J, No. 7, edited by George Stanley
New York: J, 1960
Corner-stapled sheets in printed cover, 8.5″ x 11″, 32 pages, mimeograph printed. Cover by George Stanley. Contributors: Ebbe Borregaard, Stan Persky. Published as “An Apparition of the Late J”.

J, No. 8, 1961, edited by Harold Dull
Rome: J, 1961
Contributors: Harold Dull, Stan Persky.


online excerpt from A Secret Location on the Lower East Side (Granary Books, 1998):

“In many ways the most beautiful of all the mimeo magazines, J had an eight-issue run. The first five issues were edited from North Beach bars by Jack Spicer with Fran Herndon as art editor. Spicer, who embodied the spirit of poetry in the Bay area, collected pieces for his magazine from a box marked “J” in The Place, a bar at 1546 Grant Avenue in San Francisco. A refugee from Los Angeles with two degrees from Berkeley, he had been a student of Josephine Miles there in the mid-1940s. They became close friends, and Spicer participated in the Friday afternoon poetry readings in Wheeler Hall during the late 1940s as well as the readings organized with Rocke-feller money by Ruth Witt-Diamant at the new Poetry Center at San Francisco State. Into the cauldron of poetic politics surrounding Miles, Kenneth Rexroth, Robert Duncan, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and others, Spicer introduced his freest of spirits, sometimes more Caliban than Ariel. Spicer lived for words (even making his living as a research assistant on a lexicographical project at Berkeley). He could be found most evenings in one of the North Beach bars or coffeehouses leading the discussion on poetry, poetics, myth, linguistics, and other mysteries. Like Blake and Yeats (with the help of Mrs. Yeats), Spicer attempted to clear his mind and open himself to “dictation” from other sources, which he devotedly pursued. Spicer also believed wholeheartedly in the necessity of human beings’ helping each other through communication, which he confronted in the editorship of J, a little newsletter of the poetic spirit. Donald Allen acted as J’s distributor in New York (“New York Contributions are not forbidden. But quotaed”), selling copies for Spicer to the Wilentz brothers of the Eighth Street Book Shop. In an early letter to Spicer, Allen eagerly wondered “what your editorial policy may be. Seduction by print.””


Further Reading:

Mimeo Mimeo on J